http://www.birmingham.gov.uk/cs/Satellite?c=Page&childpagename=Schools%2FPageLayout&cid=1223092746703&pagename=BCC%2FCommon%2FWrapper%2FWrapper

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John Betts Building The Betts family moved to Birmingham from Sheffield in 1769 and set up as precious metal refiners. They ran the business from a house on the site opposite, now occupied by the Assay Office car park. The company continued as bullion dealers and refiners for some 200 years. In 1970 John Betts bought the building which bears this plaque from another old company, Sheffield Smelting, and the name "John Betts & Son Ltd" was put up on the distinctive cartouche on the wall facing Charlotte Street. The company has gone through various changes but the name Betts is still associated with metal sales in the Quarter, though not from this address.

61 Charlotte Street / 55 St Paul's Square, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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Birmingham Assay Office. Since the 14th century in Britain articles of silver and gold have had to be tested at an assay office for metal purity standard and there hallmarked to protect the customer from fraud. Until the 1750s Birmingham's silversmiths and jewellers had to send their goods to London or Chester assay offices, which was inconvenient and expensive. Matthew Boulton campaigned for Birmingham to have its own Assay Office. In 1773 the first Birmingham Assay Office was opened on New Street. At first only silver was hallmarked not until 1824 could gold be marked with the Birmingham anchor mark. The Assay office has been in the present building since 1878.

Corner of Charlotte Street and Newhall Street, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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St Paul's Club and St Paul's Square. St Paul's Club is Birmingham's oldest luncheon club which has been in existence since 1859 and moved to this site in 1894. Its members still elect a weekly chairman, vice chairman and house chairman who preside over the dining room and carve the joints. Birmingham's remaining 18th century residential square was fully industrialised by the early 1950s but the remaining elegant houses have been carefully restored and adapted to other uses. Until world war II, local children without gardens played together in the churchyard, which they nicknamed "Titty-Bottle Park" because it was here that they were put in charge of their baby brothers and sisters.

Junction of Caroline Street and St. Paul's Square, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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The Argent Centre The Argent Centre is built on the site where Washington Irving conceived the Rip Van Winkle story. Designed by J.G. Bland for a gold pen manufacturer in 1863 employing 250 people. Florentine window tracing and multi coloured brick fascias make this Grade II listed building and excellent example of Italianate and polychromatic architecture popular in the 19th century. Directors had steam removed from the boilers for a Turkish bath and could also fence, play billiards, chess or recline on luxurious couches which lined their rooms. The premises were converted into small business units by Midland Industrial Assocation in 1988.

The Argent Centre, Legge Lane, Jewellery Quarter, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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Museum of the Jewellery Quarter This working museum, which opened in February 1992, is a branch of Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery. It incorporates the former Smith & Pepper jewellery works. The company was founded by Charles Smith and his uncle Edwin Pepper in 1899, and specialised in gold bracelets and other jewellery until it closed down in 1981. When the company closed, all the tools, machinery and papers were left behind. Now the building and its contents together with the former premises of butterfly wing jewellery specialists T.L. Mott Ltd., has been turned into a museum to tell the story of jewellery and the Birmingham Jewellery Quarter.

Museum of the Jewellery Quarter, Vyse Street, Jewellery Quarter, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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Jewellery Business Centre Plaque missing (stolen), but backing still there. Not seen any record on the web of what the wording is

Jewellery Business Centre - 93-107 Spencer Street, Jewellery Quarter, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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Pickering & Mayell Ltd Reliance Works Plaque missing (stolen) but backing still there

42 Caroline Street, Jewellery Quarter, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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