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No 1 Lodge This building is known as No. 1 Lodge and is one of a number of entrances into the factory. It was built in 1889 as part of a suite of offices for directors of the then newly formed Cadbury Brothers Limited Company. Prior to this date the business had been run as a partnership between brothers George and Richard Cadbury and their original offices are situated just behind No. 1 Lodge which were built in 1880. The original factory entrance was opposite the railway station (to the right) and called Station Lodge. When railway lines were installed in the factory in 1884 an additional entrance was built, just slightly to the left of this plaque, close to the pavement. This was called the Girl's Lodge and later No. 1 Lodge. It was demolished as part of the construction of the tall building to the left, known as Linden Block which was completed in 1966. The directors were relocated to this new building and the new factory entrance was created through their old offices and this is now called No. 1 Lodge. The whole Bournville site has become known as 'The Factory in a Garden'. The ancient pear tree which grew against Mrs Duffield's Cottage, that once stood near No. 1 Lodge, still remains.

Bournville Lane, Bournville, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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The Recreation Grounds From the top of the ramp ahead, there is a view of the Men's Recreation Grounds, laid out in 1896. The half-timbered pavilion was built by the Firm in 1902 in commemoration of the coronation of King Edward VII. The ground is used throughout the year for cricket, football, hockey and bowls. Many county games have been played upon it, and each summer it plays host to the popular Bournville Festival. The Girls Grounds are situated on the opposite side of Bournville Lane from the pavilion. Surrounded by trees are beautiful landscaped gardens with a pagoda and ornamental lily pond. For many years the two grounds were linked by an attractive wooden bridge over Bournville Lane. This unique setting and the preservation whenever possible of natural features in and around the site, did much during the 1920's and 1930's to help promote the Bournville Works as 'The Factory in a Garden'.

The Recreation Grounds, Cadbury World, Bournville, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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The Bourn Brook From the Bourn Brook comes the name Bournville, 'ville' being added at a time when it was fashionable to consider all confectionery to be French. In the early dats of the business it was referred to as the Bournbrook Trout Stream. Now this quiet backwater of the factory attracts ducks and other species of water fowl. Water from the pool is filtered and used for secondary cooling systems within the factory production areas and power plant. For many years a large site dominated the setting - a storage for the product known as 'crumb' which is milk chocolate at an early stage of manufacture. From this point it was possible to view Cadbury's railway which until the 1960's operated on over five miles of track within the factory site.

The Bourn Brook, Cadbury World, Bournville, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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South Cocoa Block This interesting corner of the Bournville site combine the latest technology with traditional chocolate making skills. 'South Cocoa' was the area in which cocoa beans were once processed and the powder refined and packaged into famous products such as Cadbury's Cocoa Essence. It now houses Cadbury's latest chocolate plant, with machines capable of wrapping 20,000 bars an hour. This sophisicated plant produces chocolate bars of all shapes and sizes including 'Fruit & Nut', 'Whole Nut', and many other favourites using ingrediants from all over the World - rasins from California, nuts from Turkey and cocoa beans from West Africa. The production area on your right is known as the 'Chocolate Block' where 'Bournville' - Cadbury's smooth, sophisticated, dark chocolate - is manufactured.

South Cocoa Block, Cadbury World, Bournville, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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Cadbury No 14 The 20 ton diesel locomotive began its working life in 1957 at the Cadbury factory in Moreton. It was designed to look like the rest of the Cadbury fleet, many of which were steam trains. Its job was to move products, packaging and finished goods around the factory. When in working condition its top speed was 14mph and it could haul 200 tons! In 1978 the train was temporarily relocated to the Llangollen Railway Society, then returned to Moreton before arriving at Bournville in February 2007. Cadbury No 14 was donated to Cadbury by Burton's Foods who now operate from Moreton.

Cadbury World - Trade Street, Bournville, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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Trade Street Like a small town, the factory has its own street names. From the early days at Bournville until the late 1970's the area leading to the Alternative Exhibition building (originally called the Pipe Shop) was known as "Trade Street". Above and to your right, each side of the street was lined with trade workshops, including a large printing and box-making department, all busy providing services necessary to maintain the fabric of the factory and production of the Company's products. At one stage over 55 distinct and diverse trades were employed on the site, such as engineers, builders, carpenters, painters, signwriters, electricians, plumbers, pipe fiters, mould makers, pattern makers, machine fitters, sheet metalworkers, platelayers, millwrights, belt makers, saw doctors, printers, case makers and gardeners.

Cadbury World - Trade Street, Bournville, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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Cadbury World Opened by the Rt Hon John Major MP Prime Minister 12th April 1991

Cadbury World reception - Bournville, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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In this house lived Samuel Pepys Born 1633 Died 1703

Cadbury World - Bull Street, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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White's Chocolate House Opened in 1693 near the Palace of St James. It was one of many Chocolate and Coffee Houses which were established in fashionable parts of London at this time.

Cadbury World - Bull Street, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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Whites Chocolate House in St. James, London Whites was popular with both aristocrats and wealthy city people who would gather daily, drinking chocolate, discussing politics and even gambling. It came to prominence during 1783 when William Pitt joined, turning it into a tory stronghold which survived well into the 19th century.

Cadbury World - Bull Street, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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