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Poor Clare Convent. This building was a convent of the Sisters of Poor Clare from 1862 to 1993. It was designed by architect Charles Hansom, who is also credited with the adjacent Holy Cross Church. The convent was originally founded to serve the educational needs of the town, a purpose that continues to this day. In the 19th century the nuns developed a lace making industry in Kenmare which specialised in fine needlepoint. Kenmare Lace achieved an international reputation and was sought after by the Royalty of Europe. Samples are on exhibition in the National Museum (Dublin), the Victoria and Albert Museum (London), the National Gallery (Washington) and in Kenmare Heritage Centre. The Convent was the home of Sister Mary Francis Cusack from 1862 until 1881. Known as "The Nun of Kenmare" her political activities and writings excited much controversy in the late nineteenth century Ireland, Britain and America. The Kenmare Sisters of Poor Clare moved to a new premises in 1993.

, Kenmare, Ireland

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Lansdowne Arms Hotel. This hotel was built as an inn in the 1790's and was named after the Lansdowne Family, the landlords of the estate and founders of Kenmare. In the nineteenth century the hotel benefitted from the growth of the Bantry-Killarney tourist route and was a stopping-off point for cars on organized excursions. The proprietor displayed Kenmare lace and encouraged tourists to visit the convent and school where the lace was made. E.J. (Jack) Moeran, the English classical composer whose music was inspired by the people and landscape of Kerry, frequently stayed here. He died in Kenmare on December 1st, 1950.

Main Street, Kenmare, Ireland

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Main Street. Main street was formerly named William Street in honour of the 1st Marquis of Lansdowne, William Petty-Fitzmaurice, who was raised in Lixnaw, County Kerry. He inherited the Lansdowne estates at Kenmare in 1761 and became Prime Minister of England twenty years later. The Marquis designed the plans upon which Kenmare developed in the 1770s. Main Street was renamed when the new nationalist ethos of the town asserted itself at the turn of the 20th century. The streetscape contains some fine examples of 18th and 19th century buildings.

Main Street, Kenmare, Ireland

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Rose Cottage. Rose Cottage (Tigín na Rôs) and the house adjacent to it formed the temporary home of Abbess Mary O'Hagan and six nuns from the Poor Clare Convent who arrived in Kenmare from Newry, Co. Down, in 1861 to found a new convent. Abbess O'Hagan was the sister of Thomas O'Hagan, who became Ireland's first Catholic Lord Chancellor. Her biography was published by Sister Mary Francis Cusack (the 'Nun of Kenmare') in 1877.

, Kenmare, Ireland

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Kenmare Stone Circle. This is the biggest stone circle in the south-west of Ireland, where about 100 examples occur. Stone circles were built during the Bronze age (2,200-500 BC) for ritual and ceremonial purposes. Some studies have indicated that they were orientated on certain solar and lunar events, such as the position of the sun on the horizon on a solstice. The Kenmare example may be orientated on the setting sun. In the centre of the circle is a type of burial monument known as a Boulder Burial. These are rarely found outside of south-western Ireland.

Market Street, Kenmare, Ireland

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