35610971094 975bdfbd6a m
Railway Heritage Feature Underground Map of London (circa 1931) The map was manufactured by The Chromographic Enamel Company in Wolverhampton, reputed to have been established in around 1885, and who were one of the largest manufacturers of enamel signs during the heyday of such advertising signs. The map was originally located at the ‘Grade 2 Listed’ Ealing Common station and probably dates from the reconstruction of the station that was completed in 1932. It shows the various different railway companies of that time before they were eventually amalgamated into the London Passenger Transport Board in 1933, following a series of buyouts and merge that made the Underground Group the largest component of the new ‘London Transport’. The map was recently rediscovered and is displayed here as part of LU’s heritage.

55 Broadway, London, United Kingdom

Subjects
36277489732 1240803710 m
Railway Heritage Feature Richmond Station sign (c1935-38) This vitreous enamel sign stood, for many years, outside Richmond Richmond mainline station. Photographic evidence shows it in place by the late 1930s and it appears to have been removed during the 1970s. The date of manufacture can certainly be better understood given the overall design and various styles of lettering and logos it shows. During the 1930s, when the new London Transport (formed in 1933) experimented with various designs of signs, most used his pale yellow background with the maroon border. The arrow at the base of the sign was known as a ‘Mexican arrow’ and this example, with three flights on the arrow, dates it to post 1933, as prior to that date it would have had four flights. The sign also uses colour blocks as background to the text and this was increasingly used as a device by the Underground during this period. The design of some signs was further standardised when, in 1938, LT issued the first ‘Standard Signs Manual’. Richmond was owned and primarily served by the Southern Railway who, during this period developed their own ‘house style’ that included this “sunshine” style of lined out lettering. The underground logo, using the company’s Johnston typeface, has the distinctive white bands (or “ribbons”) above and below the letters. Then, as now, Richmond was served by the district line. The “LMS” lettering refers to the London Midland & Scottish Railway, another of the ‘big four’ railway companies that had been formed in 1923, and ran the North London Railway services between Richmond and Broad Street. This service is now provided by London Overground The sign is a fascinating reminder of an earlier period of ‘co-ordination’ of elements of London's transport service that finally came to fruition with the formation of TfL. LU acquired the sign in 2008 from a private collector, who had salvaged the sign when it was removed, and is displayed here as part of LU’s heritage.

55 Broadway, London, United Kingdom

Subjects
36398552326 a0c9a13563 m
Railway Heritage Feature Directional sign from Blackfriars tube station, (c1930) This vitreous enamel sign was situated inside the entrance to the original Blackfriars station and was salvaged during the building work in c1975. The station was heavily redeveloped during that period, resulting in the demolition of the original c1870 highly ornate facade. The sign is typical of those designed for use on the Underground during the late 1920s and early 1930s when much thought was given to the standardisation of sign design and typefaces used. The sign displays the ones heavy timber frames used – In the early 1930s Charles Holden developed a slimmer bronze frame for signs used on new and reconstructed stations. It appears that many older stations that received new signs at this time continued to have the timber framed versions. The pale yellow background was also commonly used – along with the use of the purposely designed Johnston black lettering that works so well in this situation being both legible and authoritative. The style of the arrow, the flight of which appears to pierce the ring of the roundel, is also indicative of the sign’s age. This device, commonly known as ‘Mexican arrow’, was used on signs from the mid-1920s until the 1960s as a unique graphic tool and also added familiarity to the brand London Transport. The use of four flights to the arrow dates it to the years either side of 1930. By c1932 it was used with three flights and later decades saw the number gradually drop to two, then one and finally none. The site was donated by Mr. A H Rolph

55 Broadway, London, United Kingdom

Subjects
5025945153 66948e205a m
Beneath this roadway runs the world's first underground passenger railway. It was opened for public traffic by the Metropolitan Railway Company on 10 January 1863

Baker Street Station, Marylebone Road, London, United Kingdom

Subjects
Beck plaque
In memory of Harry Beck the originator of the distinctive London Underground map who lived near here and used the station regularly. The map is used by millions daily and has become recognised as a classic world-wide

Finchley Central Tube Station, London, United Kingdom

Subjects
Balham tube plaque 080120
In memory of the 64 people killed at this station by a wartime bomb 14th October 1940

Balham Tube Station, London, United Kingdom

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
In tribute to Frank Pick 1878-1941 a scholar of this school. He served his fellow-men, made transport an art and sought beauty and good design in all things.

St Peter's School, York, United Kingdom

Subjects