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Pump House. The Pump House is one of the oldest buildings in Brighton. The actual date of the current property is uncertain, but a stone fireplace (still present in the bar) bears the initials of one Miss Elliot who bought the building in 1766. The cellars date from mediaeval England and still retain the original flint foundations. In the early 19th century, there was no promenade, with the beach further inland. The original Pump House was a wooden hut which housed a hand-operated pump, situated on a jetty between Market and East Streets. This was used to pump sea water ashore to nearby hostelries for people to sample as it was believed to have health-giving properties.

46 Market Street, Brighton, United Kingdom

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The Mudlark. The Mudlark was established in the mid 1700's and was named after the people who made a living by collecting items they could sell from the mud on the River Thames. Behind The Mudlark is the Borough Market, on Borough High Street, which is the successor to the one that originally adjoined the end of London Bridge. It was first mentioned in 1276 and is said to be the oldest fruit and vegetable market in London. The present buildings were designed in 1851 with additions added in the 1860's an it has been used as a film set for Bridget Jones's Diary, Lock Stock & Two Smoking Barrels and Harry Potter, Prisoner Of Azkaban.

Montague Close, London, United Kingdom

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William Nicholson (1824-1909) Distiller, politican, cricket player, benefactor This alehouse is part of the Nicholson's heritage collection. They're all different, yet they all owe something to the man who founded them. William Nicholson was a Victorian all-rounder - a businessman, MP and sporting hero. He played first-class cricket, ran the family's distilling business, and financed Lord's Cricket Ground and its famous pavilion. In 1873, William revitalised a collection of characterful alehouses, each one and architectural delight with a strong sense of place and individuality. William added craftsmanship - marble, tiling, vibrant leaded windows - and his larger-than-life personality

25 Greek Street, London, United Kingdom

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De Hems was built in 1890 and originally called 'The Macclesfield'. In the same year a retired Dutch sea captain called De Hem purchased the pub and reinvented it as an oyster bar. He covered the interior walls of the building with them. All 300,00 shells that had been collected were later transferred to the restaurant upstairs, which became known as the shell room. During World War II the pub became a rendezvous point for the Dutch resistance. The name of the pub was officially changed from 'The Macclesfield' to 'De Hems' in 1959 in recognitiion of it's long Dutch connection

11 Macclesfield St, London, United Kingdom

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De Hems Since 1688, a public house has stood on the area now occupied by, De Hems. In 1890, De Hems was given its name from one of its former owners, a Dutch Seaman De Hem. At first, De Hems operated as an oyster bar serving oysters and stout, there was little waste from the oysters, as over 300,000 oyster shells were used to decorate the walls! The Dutch community have long been linked with De Hems, and even used the upstairs bar as a meeting place for the Dutch Resisitance during WWI (sic). Since the 1980's De Hems has had a number of refurbishments, always staying true to it's Dutch roots. Selling over quarter of a millioin pints of Oranjeboom bier each year, along with Genever and other Dutch specialities, De Hems will continue to stay true to it's origins!

11 Macclesfield St, London, United Kingdom

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