Railway Heritage Trust

The Railway Heritage Trust provides commemorative plaques at selected locations, where significant works of repair and restoration have been carried out to historic railway premises and structures with the help of grants from the Trust.
A uniform design has been agreed with Network Rail and comprises two plaques

http://www.railwayheritagetrust.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=60&Itemid=62

SER Blackfriars Station This is the entrance to the former Blackfriars Station. Commenced by the Charing Cross Railway Co. on its line from London Bridge to Charing Cross, it was taken over by the South Eastern Railway Co. before opening in January 1864. Closure came five years later when the South Eastern Railway opened its Waterloo Station (now Waterloo East). The glazed brick bridge abutments show evidence of bomb damage from the Blitz of 1940 and a V2 rocket in December 1944. Buildings in the surrounding area were damaged beyond repair, including The Ring boxing arena, formerly the Surrey Chapel, on the site of 197 Blackfriars Road.

Blackfriars Road, London, United Kingdom

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Leamington Spa railway station. This Art Deco station was opened in 1939 by the Great Western Railway to replace the original building of 1852. Restoration of the booking hall carried out by Chiltern Railways with the support of the Friends of Leamington Station, Royal Leamington Spa Town Council and the Railway Heritage Trust, was completed in 2008. This station is listed Grade II.

Old Warwick Road, Leamington Spa, United Kingdom

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The Railway Heritage Trust Conservation Award presented to Chiltern Railways & The Birmingham Alliance for Birmingham Moor Street station by HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO 2004

Moor Street Station, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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Birmingham Moor Street station. This terminal station was opened in 1909 by the Great Western Railway. In 1987 it was closed by British Rail and replaced by a new through station immediately to the north on the re-opened line to Birmingham Snow Hill Station. The original building of 1909 was restored and brought back into use as a key part of the improved new station by The Birmingham Alliance and Chiltern Railways with the support of the Railway Heritage Trust. Re-opened 11th October 2003

Moor Street Station, Birmingham, United Kingdom

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York Zero Post. The centre of York station was the Zero Point for the measurement of ten of the North Eastern Railway's lines, including those to Beverley, Harrogate, Newcastle, Normanton and Scarborough.

York station, York, United Kingdom

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Handyside Bridge This bridge was made famous through the films 'Elizabethan Express', 'The Thirty Nine Steps', and the 'Harry Potter' series. The Mid Hants Railway acknowledges the support of Network Rail and the Railway Heritage Trust in relocating this listed footbridge from its original site in Kings Cross Station

Station Hill, Ropley, United Kingdom

The Railway Heritage Trust Conservation Award Presented To Network Rail For New Bailey Street Bridges, Salford By Rt. Hon. Gwyneth Dunwoody M.P. 2007

New Bailey Street, Salford, United Kingdom

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Chester Station Island Platform 1890. Island Platform East Pavilion externally refurbished in 2010 by Arriva Trains Wales with support from the Lottery Heritage Fund, Railway Heritage Trust and Cheshire West & Chester Council.

Chester Railway Station Island Platform, Chester, United Kingdom

The Railway Heritage Trust Conservation Award Presented To Network Rail For New Bailey Street Bridges, Salford By Rt. Hon. Gwyneth Dunwoody M.P. 2007

New Bailey St, Manchester, United Kingdom

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In memory of Private Ernest Sykes VC 27th (Service) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers (Tyneside Irish Brigade) (4th April 1885-3rd August 1949). Ernest Sykes was born in Mossley and worked as a platelayer for the London & North Western Railway at Micklehurst. He enlisted into the 7th Bn. Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment on 31st August 1914, seeing action at Gallipoli, where he was seriously wounded. Following his recovery, he joined the 27th (S) Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers (Tyneside Irish Brigade), and was posted to France. ON 9th April 1917, attacking near Arras, his battalion was held up in advance of its lines, and suffered heavy casualties from machine gun fire. He went forward under intense fire and recovered four wounded comrades. Returning for a fifth time in mortal danger from sustained gunfire, he remained to bandage those casualties that could not be moved. For his gallant actions he was presented with the Victoria Cross by King George V at Buckingham Palace on 21st July 1917. He returned to the railway after the conflict, and served in the Home Guard during the Second World War,

Mossley railway station, Mossley, United Kingdom

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