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Russell Henderson 1924 Musician and Pioneering Pan Artist, Led the first ever carnival parade on the streets of Notting Hill in 1965

69 Tavistock Road, London, United Kingdom

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Edwardes Square 1811-1820 Partly built by a Frenchman, falsely rumoured to be an agent of Napoleon, derived its name from William Edwardes, 2nd Lord Kensington who then owned the land which was part of the Holland House Estate. An Act of Parliament was passed in 1819 for the maintenance of this late Georgian square

The Temple, S.Edwardes Square, Kensington, London, United Kingdom

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King Henry VIII 1491-1547 Close to this site stood the King's Manor House. Part of its boundary wall adjoins Cheyne Studio

23 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, SW3, London, United Kingdom

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Crosby Hall originally stood in Bishopsgate in the City of London and was transferred to this site under threat of demolition in 1910. It formed part of Crosby Place built in th 15th century for Sir John Crosby, a wealthy wool merchant, and after him was occupied by King Richard III. It later passed to Sir Thomas More on whose estate in Chelsea it has come to rest.

Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, SW3, London, United Kingdom

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The Trafalgar Way. Kensington. On Monday 21st October 1805 the Royal Navy decisively defeated a combined French and Spanish fleet off Cape Trafalgar on the south west coast of Spain. This victory permanently removed the threat of invasion of England by the armies of Napoleon Bonaparte. The first official dispatches with the momentous news of the victory,and the death in action of Vice Admiral Lord Nelson,were carried on board H.M. Schooner PICKLE by her captain Lieutenant John Richards Lapenotiere. Lapenotiere landed at Falmouth on Monday 4th November 1805 and set out "express by post-chaise" for London, following what is now known as The Trafalgar Way. He took some 37 hours to cover the 271 mile journey, changing horses 21 times, one of these being very late on 5th November at Hounslow. His orders were to lose no time in reaching the Admiralty so, as the horses were not yet spent, he made what speed he could through Kensington in a dense fog towards his final destination. Over the following four weeks other important messages arrived from the fleet with further details of the victory and anxiously awaited information on casualties. All the dispatches were landed at Falmouth and their couriers took the same route through Kensington where horses and hospitality were available from the inns to all travellers on what is now The Trafalgar Way.

Holland Park, Kensington High Street, London, United Kingdom

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King Henry VIII’s Manor House stood here until 1753 when it was demolished after the death of its last occupant, Sir Hans Sloane. Nos. 19 to 26 Cheyne Walk were built on its site in 1759-65. The old manor house garden still lies beyond the end wall of Cheyne Mews and contains some mulberry trees said to have been planted by Queen Elizabeth I.

23 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, SW3, London, United Kingdom

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