Rutherglen Heritage Trail

The plaques in Rutherglen Heritage Trail were originally put in place by Glasgow City Council. Since 1996, the town of Rutherglen is no longer within Glasgow city's administrative boundaries, now falling within the boundaries of South Lanarkshire Council.
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The Churchyard is first mentioned in records dating from 1262, until the Reformation and for sometime thereafter. As well as for burials, it was used as a meeting place for business transactions. When the new cemetery in Mill Street was opened in 1881 the churchyard was officially closed. Burials, however, continued to take place therein until the mid 1950s.

Old Parish Church, Main Street, G73 1JP, Rutherglen, United Kingdom

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Steeple or Bell Tower. The Steeple or Bell Tower was added to the 12th Century church c 1500, the east gable of which has survived. In 1635 a new bell, the work of Michael Burgerhuys of Middleburg, Holland, was presented to the parish church by the citizens of Rutherglen. By 1655, this bell was used by both town and church when the town council ordered it to be rung at 5am and 10pm daily.

Old Parish Church graveyard, Main Street, G73 1JP, Rutherglen, United Kingdom

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The Tolbooth and Mercat Cross. The Tolbooth built in 1767 stood until 1900 in front of the later public library. Prior to 1862 the town council met in the Tolbooth which, until 1877, also housed the police office and jail. The original Mercat Cross stood in Main Street in front of the Tolbooth until 1777. On May 28th 1679, three days before the Battle of Drumclog the Covenanters affixed their Declaration of Rutherglen to the cross. The present cross erected in 1926 is a replica of the original.

Main Street, G73 2JJ, Rutherglen, United Kingdom

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The Kirk Port was built in 1663 in a Renaissance style to replace the earlier entrance at the west end of the churchyard. Building costs were part funded by fines levied for the profanation of the Sabbath. The sundial was added in 1679. The two stone shelters within the gate date from 1761. They were used by the elders as they collected the offerings of the congregation passing into the church.

Rutherglen Old Parish Church churchyard, Main Street, G73 1JP, Rutherglen, United Kingdom

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The Town Hall opened in 1862 and was designed in the "Scottish Baronial" style by the painter and architect Charles Wilson (1810 - 1863) to replace the Toolbooth as the town council's meeting place. It was extended in 1876-77 to a design by Robert Dagleish (1839 - 1898) to accommodate the police office, jail and a new council chamber.

139 Main Street, G73 2JJ, Rutherglen, United Kingdom

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Old Parish Church the first recorded church on the site was built c 1180. The Parliament held at Rutherglen by the Guardians of Scotland on May 10th 1300 may have met in this church. After the Reformation only the nave remained and was in use as the parish church until 1794. From 1794 until 1900 a new church served the parish. This was replaced by the present church designed by the architect J J Burnet, which opened in 1902.

Old Parish Church, Main Street, G73 1JP, Rutherglen, United Kingdom

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In commemoration of the generosity of William James Chrystal Esq. of Auchendennan and Shawfield Works, this tablet is erected by the Corporation of Rutherglen on the site of the properties - now demolished - extending from Main Street to King Street, acquired by him and presented to the Burgh in the year 1899 to effect the widening of Queen Street and provide an access to the church

Main Street, G73 2JJ, Rutherglen, United Kingdom

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Rutherglen Castle stood near here. It was built c. 1264, possibly replacing an earlier structure. Captured during the War of Independence by pro-English forces, it was repossessed by 1313 by Edward Bruce. After the Battle of Langside, May 13th 1568 it was burnt down. One tower was rebuilt and became the seat of the Hamiltons of Elistoun, Lairds of Shawfield. The last remains of the castle had been quarried away by 1770.

20 Castle Street, G73 1DY, Rutherglen, United Kingdom

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