Antioch Cemetery. This burial ground has served the community of Antioch since the late 19th century. In December 1880, W.H. and Mattie l. Grazier, early area settlers, deeded the land to Brown County for educational and cemetery purposes. Residents built a combination church and school building nearby, and this site became a focal point for community gatherings. The school eventually merged with another local district before becoming part of the Blanket school system. The earliest marked graves in Antioch Cemetery, both dating to 1881, are those of Eugene Bettis and an unnamed individual whose footstone bears the initials J.A.R. The northwest corner of the cemetery includes gravesites, possibly earlier, marked only by fieldstones and believed to date from the Grazier family ownership. A number of important Antioch pioneers are among those interred here, including William Andrew Turner, a Civil War veteran from Florida who received his land grant here; Civil War veteran Jesse Richard Bettis, who participated in the battles of Bull Run and Fredericksburg, and donor of additional land for the cemetery; and the Rev. Joseph Frederick Parsons, a native of Baden-baden, Germany. Veterans of later military conflicts, as well as other community leaders, are also buried here. In 1982, county commissioners deeded this property to the Antioch Cemetery Association for perpetual care of the historic burial ground. Today, the cemetery remains as a visible reminder of the early pioneers of the area who, through challenges and hardships, forged a sense of unity, strengthening the Antioch community. #17423

?, Blanket, TX, United States

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Swanson Cemetery. #17427

?, , TX, United States

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McCarty Cemetery. In 1860, Orange McCarty, Sr. (1813-1897) and his wife, Mary Arrington (1820-1881), purchased 2200 acres in the Antonio Solis survey that included this site. Their move here from Mississippi was delayed by the outbreak of the Civil War; two McCarty sons died in action fighting for the South. Join by the Arrington and McCall families, the remaining McCartys finally arrived here in 1866 and built a log cabin overlooking Jack Creek. This acre of land was set aside for a cemetery. The earliest marked grave indicates it was in use by 1873. The McCarty Cemetery Association maintains this resting place for these Angelina County Pioneers. #17428

?, , TX, United States

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The Battle of Red River. In the opening battle of the U.S. Army's 1874 Indian campaign against the Southern Plains Indian Tribes, a force of 744 soldiers under Col. Nerlson A. Miles fought a 5-hour running battle with the Cheyenne, Comanche and Kiowa 10 mi. E. of this location. The army had been pursuing the bands for several days. The battle marked the first use of the Gatling Gun by the army west of the Mississippi River. Though the army destroyed several Indian villages, they failed to capture any of the Indiaans or force them back to reservations in Indian Territory (Oklahoma). Known today as the Red River War, the campaign against the Indians resulted in their ultimate removal from the Texas panhandle. #17440

?, Wayside, TX, United States

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Renfro Cemetery #1. John Folkner Renfro, Sr. (1797-1859) and wife, Rebecca Harrison Hicks (1808-1869), moved to Texas in 1839 by wagon from Missouri. In 1840, they settled in this area, known as Renfro Prairie, where they raised ten children and were leaders in the local Methodist church. The family prospered and were helpful to new settlers adjusting to the East Texas life. At least seven members of the family of Moses Warren Spivey (1829-1904), who lived nearby on Bear Creek, share this Renfro burial ground with Berry, Davis, Kirby, Payne and Renfro families. This pioneer cemetery is honored and cared for by the Spivey-Renfro Cemetery Association. #17441

?, , TX, United States

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Maple Cemetery. In 1934, in the midst of drought and the Great Depression, landowner Maple Wilson donated four acres for a cemetery for the small community that bore his name. It was used briefly up until World War II. Today, the identities of only three burials are known: infant Jay T. Sanderson (d. 1934); James Gentry (1885-1936), struck by lightning, leaving a wife and five children; and Minnie Elizabeth Daricek (1897-1935), who died quietly while nursing her eleventh child. Reportedly, three to five infants of Mexcian descent are also interred here. This burial ground is a reminder of the hard times face by Bailey County families in the 1930s. #17443

?, , TX, United States

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Elgin Cemetery. Texas Cemetery Medallion #17444

?, Elgin, TX, United States

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Pleasanton City Cemetery. Texas cemetery medallion #17445

?, Pleasanton, TX, United States

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Old Travis Cemetery. Texas cemetery medallion #17446

?, , TX, United States

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Little River-Wilson Valley Cemetery. Texas cemetery medallion #17447

?, , TX, United States

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Old Salado Graveyard. This burial ground was likely in use about the time a U.S. Post Office was established in Salado Springs in 1852. In 1854 Col. Elijah Sterling C. Robertson purchased a large tract of land north and south o the springs that included the cemetery. It is generally accepted that the original 2.5 acre graveyard was part of 100 acres that he donated in 1850 for the creation of Salado College and the town of Salado. Additional land was acquired through purchase and donation over the years and a permanent endowment fund exists for the care and maintenance of this resting place for generations of Salado's citizens. #17448

?, Salado, TX, United States

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McCulloch Cemetery. Samuel McCulloch, Jr. (1810-1893), wounded at the Battle of Goliad October 9, 1835, was one of the first casualties in the Texas Revolution. This site is part of land he received in 1850 as a bounty for his service. The oldest marked grave is that of his father who died in 1855. It became known as Medina Baptist Cemetery after he deeded 1.5 acres to the church in 1861. In 1866 the congrgegation relocated and the site became a community cemetery. Buried here are area pioneers, Civil War veterans, noted potter Louis Meyer, and many early citizens of Bexar County. This burial ground is also known as Mann's Crossing Cemetery. #17451

8500 block of Old Pearsall Road, San Antonio, TX, United States

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Wetmore Community Cemetery. Texas cemetery medallion #17452

?, , TX, United States

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Scrutchfield Cemetery. Located on two acres of the M. Boren survey of 1846, this cemetery was deeded to Bosque County for public burials by Lowry Hampton Scrutchfield in 1883. Family records indicate that Minni, the infant daughter of Daniel and Carloyn Mabray Henderson, was the first to be buried on this site. The earliest legible tombstone is that of six-month-old Alpheus C. Potts, who was born and died in 1885. Lowry H. Scrutchfield (1824-1900), his wife Nancy Proffit Scrutchfield (1835-1903) and his mother Nancy Pool Scrutchfield Roberts (1800-1839) are all interred here. The graves of Nancy Scrutchfield Roberts and A.J. Lewis, another early settler were re-interred here in the late 20th century. More than 50 identifiable graves, marked and unmarked, grace this cemetery. #17453

?, , TX, United States

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Hudgins Cemetery. Established circa 1853 #17454

?, , TX, United States

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Alexander Methodist Church. Organized in 1854 in Tabor com. By Robert Alexander, Circuit Rider. First church built of hand-hewn logs in 1856 by early settlers, George Fullerton, Hugh Henry, Jim Walker, John Walker, E. W. Thompson and others. Ten acres for church land and cemetery donated by Eliz Boatright and John Singleton was deeded to the following trustees: James Walker, William Lawrence, John B. Wallace, William Glass and Harvey Mitchelle. Second church was built of lumber in 1908-- W.D. Gardner, Pastor Thurd (present) church was built in 1939-- Willard Smith, Pastor. #17455

?, , TX, United States

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Eureka Cemetery. Texas cemetery medallion #17456

?, , TX, United States

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Zephyr Cemetery. Texas cemetery medallion #17457

?, , TX, United States

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Caldwell Masonic Cemetery. Texas Cemetery medallion #17458

?, Caldwell, TX, United States

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Oaklawn Cemetery. #17459

?, , TX, United States

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Oatmeal Cemetery. Texas cemetery medallion #17460

?, Oatmeal, TX, United States

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Johnson Perry Cemetery. Texas cemetery medallion #17461

?, Lytton Springs, TX, United States

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Lytton Springs Cemetery. Texas cemetery medallion #17462

?, Lytton Springs, TX, United States

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The Old Weaver Cemetery. Texas cemetary medallion #17463

?, , TX, United States

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Zepeda Cemetery. Texas cemetery medallion #17464

?, Ranchito, TX, United States

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Kildare Cemetery. As the Kildare area was being settled, the need for a cemetery was met by the donation of land from the Moor family, local plantation owners. The earliest dated burial is that of Risdon Moor (1803-1868), but older burials likely exist. John T. Moore donated another acre in 1937 and an association formed in 1982 has continued to expand and improve the site. Since 1980, the Kildare Memorial Day Ceremony annually honors its veterans. The community has a long history of actively caring for this site that remains as a chronicle of the pioneers and families that made this plantation and timber area of Cass County their home. Historic Texas Cemetery- 1999 #17465

?, Kildare, TX, United States

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Laws Chapel Cemetery. Originally a family cemetery, this burial ground began upon the death of Henry G. Law (1813-1854), son of George and Martha McDonald Law, who died shortly after the family moved here from Georgia. The site eventually became a community cemetery and another son, Richard R. Law, donated 6 acres to the Laws Chapel Church and Cemetery in 1869. The graveyard later was shared with nearby Piney Grove Baptist Church after it was established in 1887. Expanded by 1.5 acres in 1941, the cemetery continues to serve the community and remains a chronicle of the pioneers, veterans, and families of Cass County. #17466

?, Atlanta, TX, United States

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Pine Crest Cemetery. Located on the highest elevation of Atlanta, the first two acres of this site were formally deed to the city for cemetery use by Preston Rose Scott in 1887. The earliest marked grave, that of Esthre Fitts, dated August 7, 1878, indicates its earlier use as a burial ground. The oldest grave in a segregated area once separated by a fence, now removed, is that of R.A. Williams (d. 1880). A four-acre gift by the H.G. Goree Estate in 1934, and a land acquisition in 1984, have allowed for the growth of this cemetery where the descendants of those who developed the Atlanta area continue to honor their veterans and loved ones. Historic Texas cemetery-2001 #17467

?, Atlanta, TX, United States

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Cresson School Approximately ten years after settlers began moving to this area, Hood County was formed from part of Johnson County in 1866. Cresson was platted in the late 1880s, and surveyor Madison Jones later deeded land at this site for school purposes. Cresson, like many of the rural communities surrounding it, started its school programs in one-room schoolhouses. Cresson's was located just west of this site and was torn down in 1890 when a two-story frame structure was erected here. This schoolhouse was used until 1918, when it was replaced by a larger, red brick building that burned years later in October 1930. Students attended classes at local churches while the school district worked to build a new schoolhouse. The M.l. Wallace & Co. architectural firm from Dallas served as designer, and county school superintendent Victor B. Penuel chose the appearance for the new school building. The yellow-brick, mission revival schoolhouse was completed in 1931, with an auditorium and four large classrooms. Design elements include cartouches and decorative elements in window surrounds. Fund-raisers held during subsequent years added a kitchen and indoor restroom facilities. In July 1965, a severe storm damaged several buildings in Cresson, and lightning struck the school. The central parapet on the main façade, designed to resemble the curved parapet of the Alamo in San Antonio, was damaged and later replaced. After Cresson consolidated with Granbury schools in 1967, the school building sat abandoned; a community group organized in the late 1970s to work for its restoration. Today, the school serves as a community center and as a link to Cresson's early educational programs. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2003

116 North Crook Street, Cresson, TX, United States

Dalworthington Gardens The city of Dalworthington Gardens began as a result of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Depression-era policies. Roosevelt supported the "back-to-the-land" movement, encouraging urban workers to live on and cultivate rural property. Roosevelt signed the National Industrial Recovery Act into law in 1933; it authorized the establishment of a subsistence homestead program. While visiting the Arlington area, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt saw this area as a possible site for the Homestead Project. In December 1933, a corporation was formed for a state charter and titled Dalworthington Gardens, Inc. (Combining the names of nearby Dallas, Fort Worth, and Arlington). Early the next year, the Federal Government bought property south of Arkansas Lane near Arlington. By June, Civil Works Administration workers arrived to clear the area for 80 development sites. Only people from the Dallas or Fort Worth areas would qualify to live in Dalworthington Gardens. By May 1935, most of the construction was complete. However, applicants that moved into the homes had to deal with many issues, including lack of gas, faulty water and sewage piping, and unfenced property. Residents, however, worked together to build a tight-knit community. They soon established a community house that became a center of activity. In 1949, residents petitioned to have the colony incorporated into a town. Today, though surrounded by Arlington and Pantego in the thriving Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, Dalworthington Gardens remains the only subsistence homestead project existing as an autonomous community in Texas. 2010 Marker is property of the State of Texas

2600 Roosevelt Dr., Dalworthington Gardens, TX, United States

Turnersville Cemetery This burial ground served residents of the rural community of Turnersville (originally Buchanan Springs). Settled before the Civil War, Turnersville boasted a cotton gin, stores, a school, and three churches by the 1880s. The interred here include many of these past residents, with ranchers, farmers, merchants, physicians, teachers, ministers, and military veterans among them. Cemetery features include interior fencing, curbing, and grave slabs. A cemetery association formed by 1900, but disbanded in the 1930s. The Turnersville Cemetery Association reorganized in 1953, and still continues to care for the burial ground. Today, the cemetery is one of the few remaining vestiges of the Turnersville community. Historic Texas Cemetery - 2010 Marker is Property of the State of Texas

8060 FM 182, Turnersville, TX, United States

Dr. Jack Shackelford (March 20, 1790 - January 22, 1857) Physician and military commander, Jack Shackelford, was born in Richmond, Virginia. He earned an M.D. degree and in 1811, moved to Winnsboro, South Carolina, where he opened his first practice and met Maria Youngue, whom he married. Shackelford enlisted in the Army during the War of 1812, where he served on Andrew Jackson's staff and was wounded at Charleston. After the war, he moved his family to Alabama, where he continued to practice medicine, owned a cotton plantation and served in the State Senate. In 1835, Shackelford raised a company of nearly 70 volunteers (approximately half of the male population of Courtland, AL), his eldest son, Fortunatus, and two nephews, to join in the Texas War for Independence. The group, which became known as the Red Rovers, came under command of Col. James Fannin. During the battle of Coleto, Dr. Shackelford's orders saved numerous lives. Unfortunately, most of the survivors were executed on March 27, 1836; Dr. Shackelford was spared because of his medical training. He cared for Mexican soldiers in Goliad and then in San Antonio. After the battle of San Jacinto, he and Dr. Joseph Barnard escaped; they returned to Goliad to secure burial for the massacre victims, and then to Velasco, where Shackelford obtained an honorable discharge. Dr. Shackelford returned to Alabama after the war. Following Maria's death in 1842, he married Martha Chardevoyne. Although he never became a resident, Dr. Shackelford maintained close ties to friends and former military comrades living in Texas. His notes about Col. Fannin and the events of Coleto and Goliad remain important accounts. In 1858, Shackelford County was established and named in honor of the contributions and sacrifices he made for the Texas cause. (2010) Marker is the property of the State of Texas

389 S 2nd St, Albany, TX, United States

Booker T. Washington School Serving the African-American students of Arlington, Booker T. Washington School was a vital institution in the city. It had its roots in Arlington’s first black school, which was in place by the 1890s. The school served the growing African-American community known as The Hill, located northwest of the original town boundaries. The Church of God in Christ furnished additional class space as needed. In 1902, the school became part of the newly formed Arlington Independent School District. George Stevens and Gloria Echols were appointed as teachers, with Stevens also serving as principal; both lived in the neighborhood and are noted for their impact in the lives of their young students. The original school building was replaced after a severe 1903 storm. Students attended the school until eighth grade, at which point they went to I.M. Terrell High School in Fort Worth. A new facility opened at 500 Houston Street in 1954, officially named for educator Booker T. Washington. The building had eight classrooms, an administrative office, and a cafeteria; a gymnasium was added later. George Stevens continued to serve as principal of the institution. In 1965, Arlington public schools began full desegregation. Booker T. Washington School closed and became Veda Knox School, a facility for students with special education needs. It was later renamed the Metro Math and Science Academy. Today, Booker T. Washington school is remembered as an iconic institution in The Hill, providing students with skills and education that would help them achieve success in their personal and professional lives. (2010) Marker is Property of the State of Texas

500 Houston St., Arlington, TX, United States

Mineral springs such as nearby Hancock Springs flow into Sulphur Creek, providing Lampasas with waters for recreation and health. The Hancock Springs tract became a fashionable tourist attraction and convention and encampment site in the late 19th century; by the 1880s, Lampasas advertised as “The Saratoga of the South.” In 1911, Dan Culver excavated a large open-air swimming pool in Hancock Park, utilizing spring-fed waters. Charles Baker and L.N. Little bought the property in 1929. Materials from the Texas Baptist Encampment dining hall were used to build the Hostess House south of the pool. The two-story frame building included a reception hall and changing room for the swimming pool, with an open-air dance platform on the second floor. Local bands and nationally known performers made the venue a popular destination. In 1936, the city of Lampasas bought the park, including the Hostess House. During World War II, the U.S. government leased Hancock Park as a recreation area, called Panther Park, for soldiers stationed at Camp Hood (later Fort Hood). In 1947, a gold course opened to the west and improvements to the Hostess House included a limestone veneer. After additional renovations to park facilities in 1948, Texas Governor Beauford Jester and U.S. Congressman Lyndon Johnson attended a rededication ceremony. For many years following, the people of Lampasas continued to swim in the pool and attend dances and proms on the second floor. By the 1990s, the building had fallen into disrepair. The city leased the building to the Oran Milo Roberts chapter of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, which coordinated fundraising to renovate and restore the Hostess House and continue its public use. (2007) Marker is property of the state of Texas

1600 South Highway 281, Lampasas, TX, United States

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Pioneer settlers began establishing homes near Lampasas Springs and Sulphur Creek in the 1850s. During the middle 19th century, stories of the mineral springs and their curative powers began attracting tourists to Lampasas, which was sometimes called the “Saratoga of the South,” in reference to the famed New York spa community. The Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railroad extended its line to Lampasas in 1882, making travel to the area easier, and with the rail came capital investors who quickly built hotels and tourist facilities. In 1882, land at this site was sold from the John and George Hancock family to George L. Porter of Harris County who transferred the property to the Lampasas Springs Company. The company built a bathhouse here, creating changing rooms, facilities for hot and cold baths, and bathing pools for men and women. The company also erected the Grand Park Hotel, which was located northwest of the bathhouse. A mule-drawn streetcar connected the bathhouse with the passenger depot on the other side of town. Sulphur Creek, which is fed by the springs, has flooded several times since construction of the bathhouse, and the roof of the facility was gone by 1920, possibly carried away by floodwaters. However, the limestone walls remained. In 1936, the city purchased the land and used the springs to supply water to the community. The turquoise waters of the pool, now part of a city park, demonstrate Lampasas’ history as a tourist destination. The springs were once the foundation of the economy in Lampasas and are now historical treasures of the community. The city, in an effort to preserve this history, stabilized the remaining bathhouse walls in 2003. (2004)

1600 South Highway 281, Lampasas, TX, United States

On September 20, 1898, Robert P. Lowe and his wife purchased the property at this site. The commonly held belief is that the house was built by Robert Lowe, who retired from Mobile and Ohio Railroad in 1894 and settled his family in Weatherford. He built the home sometime between 1897 and 1899 during construction of the building that would house his hardware business. Due to a fire that destroyed the Parker County Courthouse in 1874 early records of the home are non-existent. The earliest Sanborn map is for 1885 that depicts a home at the current location and the 1894 map depicts the same home which strongly suggests that a pre-existing structure was expanded or remodeled in the 1890s. The Wright House represents the Queen Anne style, but with minimal modifications. In 1905, the back porch was enclosed to create a bathroom, closets were added in the bedrooms and the kitchen was remodeled. The original transoms are still in place as is the stained-glass transom panel over the front door. After the death of Robert Lowe in 1920 and his wife Evalina in 1924, the house was eventually sold to Nannie Hauser in 1927. James Claude and Marie Wright purchased the home from Hauser in 1940. James Wright started a business selling street signs to small towns and established National Trade Days to help promote small businesses. The descendants of James Wright occupied the home until 1972. In 2009, the city of Weatherford purchased the home to prevent demolition and convert the space to city offices. This historic home’s architecture and ties to the Lowe and Wright family enhance Weatherford’s historic fabric. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2012 Marker is property of the State of Texas

202 W. Oak St., Weatherford, TX, United States

Ben Wheeler Community Just as Native Americans were attracted to this area because of the climate and resources. Early settlers also utilized these resources. The are was originally named Clough after George W. Clough (1820-1884) who, in 1868, purchased the 640-acre Harvey Randolf Survey. The northwest corner of his land became the majority of the old downtown of Ben Wheeler. Clough established a post office in his home in 1876 and became the first postmaster. The post office was named Ben Wheeler in honor of Kentucky native Benjamin F. Wheeler. Wheeler came to Texas in 1847 and contracted to carry the mail from Tyler to Buffalo and was the first person to carry mail into Van Zandt county. In the early 1880's George Clough applied for permission to move the post office to his store in town and change the name to Georgetown. Permission was granted to move the post office bu the name remained Ben Wheeler since there was already a town named Georgetown. Ancel Clough, heir to George Clough, sold 50 acres in 1885 to Professor James F. Davidson. In 1890, Davidson and J.W. Downs established the Alamo Institute. The first school of higher learning in Van Zandt county. The town grew rapidly from 1885 to 1892 and boasted four general stores, two grocery stores, a drug store, boarding houses, a hotel, three gins and mills, a blacksmith and wood working shop, two churches and the Alamo Institute. Fires in 1893, 1933 and in 1945 destroyed businesses in the downtwon area. Ben Wheeler's growth began to decline in 1929, but stabilized in the 1960's when the area farmers transitioned into ranching and coastal Bermuda haying operations. 175 Years of Texas Independence - 1836 - 2011 Marker is property of The State of Texas

1551 FM 279, Ben Wheeler, TX, United States

Grace First Presbyterian Church Three congregations, the earliest founded in 1859, joined forces in Parker County to create Grace First Presbyterian Church. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church, the oldest of the three congregations, focused on education as an important ministry to this church. The Pioneer School at Veal Station was deeded to the church to improve the education of Parker County's youth. The Texas Female Seminary was established in 1889 by the Presbyterians and flourished until 1911 when it was sold to the Weatherford Sanitarium. The Weatherford Presbyterian Church (later the First Presbyterian Church) was established by the P.C.U.S. in 1874. When the Rev. H. A. Tucker, related to the Northern Branch of Presbyterianism, was mistakenly called by the Weatherford Presbyterian Church, the result was the establishment of the First Presbyterian Church U.S.A. Grace Presbyterian Church, a U.S.A congregation, in 1906 grew out of the Cumberland Congregation. Grace and First informally joined forces in 1927 after prayer and consideration. In 1964 the Weatherford congregations merged to organize as Grace First Presbyterian Church. Members have contributed to the community in numerous ways, including the establishment and continuing support of Manna Storehouse, Inc., the first community-based agency to provide food and clothing for Parker County's needy citizens. Grace First members helped establish the Parker County chapter of Habitat for Humanity and are also active in the work of the Fort Worth Presbyterian Night Shelter. In 1974, Grace First Presbyterian Church celebrated 100 years of worship and service in the Weatherford Community by moving into a new building, and continues to worship and serve the Parker County community to this day. (2012) Marker is property of the State of Texas

606 Mockingbird Ln., Weatherford, TX, United States

Alamo Institute In 1890 Van Zandt county had 81 schools but none for higher learning. In April 1890, Prof. James F. Davidson and J. W. Downs held a community meeting in the Old Clough School House in Ben Wheeler. They presented a plan, adopted unanimously, to establish Alamo Institute if citizens transferred control of Clough School. The institute’s main building was completed in time for the fall semester. By 1894 the campus included a pair of two-story buildings. Courses included history, latin, science, music and voice culture. Alamo Institute closed before 1911. State representative, county and district attorney, and U. S. Congressman Morgan G. Sanders was the most prominent graduate. (2009) Marker is property of The State of Texas

County Road 4702, Ben Wheeler, TX, United States

Plainview Cemetery Located in western Denton County, Plainview Cemetery served as a burial ground for early settlers in the area. The Plainview community began around 1878 when the families of Gideon Kimbrough (1833-1923) and William Kimbrough (1824-1912) and their families arrived from Bellville, Tennessee. As the community grew, the need for a school was recognized and a one-room school building was erected. In 1894, a Baptist Sunday school began to meet in the building. The Plainview Baptist Church formed in 1896 and built a church on land donated by C.R. Moreman. In 1898, a plot of land adjoining the church was purchased from the estate of James B. Walker (1848-1898) to be used as a cemetery. Mr. Walker was the first burial in the cemetery. It became the only cemetery for the Plainview community. At least five people from the area were buried in the cemetery prior to 1900. A large increase in burials took place in the early 1900s because of a national influenza epidemic. The cemetery has a variety of marble and cement headstones marked with biblical scripture, masonic markings, woodmen seals and military headstones. Many founding families of the community have gravesites in the cemetery as well as generations of their descendants. Maintained by the Plainview Cemetery Association, the graves provide a record of the settlers of the area, including teachers, preachers and veterans. The Plainview Baptist Church and the cemetery are the only remnants of this once flourishing farming community. Historic Texas Cemetery - 2012 Marker is Property of the State of Texas

12221 FM 1173, Krum, TX, United States

Holland Community Present-day Holland has its origins in three different settlements. Settlers first came here during the 1830s to farm the area’s fertile soil. A community named Mountain Home (0.5 mi SE) formed along Darrs Creek and included a school, church, businesses and a cotton gin. A post office opened in 1870, with James Shaw serving as postmaster. In 1874, James R. “Rube” Holland (1847-1912), a Civil War veteran, came to Bell county from Arkansas. In 1878, he built a steam-powered cotton gin on his property three miles southwest of Mountain Home. The next year, a post office named Holland opened in a store near the gin; Alfred Evans (1810-1896), a former state representative and veteran of the Indian Wars and the U.S.-Mexico War, was appointed postmaster. In 1881, the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad passed through this area. G.M. Dodge (1831-1916), a Civil War veteran and civil engineer, purchased land for this town site, which became known as (New) Mountain Home. Businesses moved from Old Mountain Home to this new town, and in 1882, the Holland Post Office moved here as well. The community adopted the name Holland by the mid-1880s. The new town grew quickly; immigrants, primarily Czechs and Germans, soon came here and helped the farming community become a leading producer of cotton. A rural telephone system was started in 1902 and electricity was connected in 1915. By 1920, Holland had several churches, two banks, two hotels, noted schools, four cotton gins, an opera house and a population of over 1,000 residents. A volunteer fire department officially organized in 1929. Today, Holland persists as an agricultural community rich in heritage and history. (2009) Marker is Property of the State of Texas

205 W Travis, Holland, TX, United States

St. Paul United Methodist Church In 1873, several inhabitants of Freedman's Town, a community of recently freed people just north of the Dallas city limits, met with Methodist Ministers Rev. H. Oliver and Rev. William Bush under a brush arbor to organize the area's first African American Methodist Episcopal Church. Oliver became St. Paul's first pastor. Dallas Postmaster Anthony Norton donated the first church site upon which the congregation built a small frame sanctuary, which was also used as a school for African American children. In partnership with the Perkins School of Theology, the church provided training for African American ministers. Samuel Huston College (later Huston-Tillotson University), organized in 1876, held its first classes at the church. In 1901, the congregation began constructing a new brick-clad sanctuary by digging and finishing a concrete basement, called "Noah's Ark," where services were held during the 26 years it took to complete the sanctuary. Construction proceeded fitfully as material became available. Tradition holds that the façade has five different shades of brown brick because, for many years, parishioners brought bricks for the offering. Finally completed in 1927 under the leadership of Pastor George Deslandes, the sanctuary cost $80,000. The Gothic Revival style was derived from a design by William Sidney Pittman, Dallas' first African American architect. Although around 1950 highway construction began to demolish the North Dallas neighborhoods served by the church, St. Paul endured as a political, cultural and spiritual center under the leadership of Pastor I.B. Loud (1948-1980) and his successors. 2013 Marker is Property of the State of Texas

1816 Routh St, Dallas, TX, United States

Carrollton Black Cemetery Carrollton’s early African-Americans, many of whom were former slaves, helped settle and build the community. By 1871, this portion of forty acres belonging to Scott Boswell, Sr., an African-American farmer, was a community cemetery. In 1915, C.B. Baxley acquired the cemetery and surrounding land. Although the site holds dozens of burials, only three names (Ned Welch, Loving, and Davis) are now visible. Joyce Collins (1960) is believed to be the last burial. No records exist for others buried here; flooding from the Elm Fork of the Trinity River destroyed many grave markers. Once threatened by new development, the site is a precious record of the early history of Carrollton. Historic Texas Cemetery – 2010 Marker is Property of the State of Texas

1525 West Belt Line Road, Carrollton, TX, United States

Splitrock (Burns-Klein House) In 1891, Thomas F. Burns bought 3 ¾ acres of the Jones and Sedwick property along the west bank of Shoal Creek. Burns, a Scottish immigrant, married Arbanna J. Nelson in Travis County in 1876. Property records and lumber marked “Sutor & Co.” Date his house to circa 1892. Thomas, Arbanna and six children lived here in 1900. Thomas was listed as a stone cutter and owner of a marble shop. He added an additional acre to his homestead in 1901. Thomas’ son, Frank C. Burns, owned the Capitol City Marble Co. at 211 W. 6th Street. In 1911, Thomas Burns sold the property to Hippolyt Dittlinger, owner of Dittlinger Roller Mills in New Braunfels. His niece, Anita Dittlinger Quinlan, and her husband, James, lived here with their three children from 1912-39. In 1939, the Quinlans moved to Fredericksburg and subdivided land surrounding the house into eight city lots on the east side of Splitrock Avenue (later Wooldridge Drive). In 1945, Anita sold the property to Joe H. Klein, Jr., and his wife, Jayne Linville Klein. The 1 ½-story frame house is a vernacular center passage dwelling, designed with three rooms on each side of the hallway. Stairs provided access to the attic and dormer bedrooms. Originally, the east side of the house, looking toward the city, was the front. When Splitrock Avenue became a designated street in Pemberton Heights, primary access was reversed and the west side became the front. The scenic property on a bluff above the creek includes numerous centuries-old live oak trees, the largest of which is a city of Austin registered tree. The house has remained largely unaltered, even as the city has expanded far beyond its once-rural setting. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2013 Marker is property of the State of Texas

2815 Wooldridge Drive, Austin, TX, United States

Adamsville The first permanent settlers came to this area shortly before Lampasas County organized in 1856. Oliver Hazzard Perry Townsen bought 640 acres from Samuel Horrell, Sr. and his wife Elizabeth in 1868. Townsen grew wheat and established a flour mill, and in 1876 became postmaster of Townsen Mills southeast of this site near the Lampasas River. An 1884 business directory noted that the community included steam flour and saw mills, three churches and a school, a doctor, wagonmaker, and general store. After Townsen died in 1891 in a mill accident, a new post office opened at the Smith and Adams General Store. John T. Adams, first postmaster of Adamsville, and the Rev. McCall Smith were business partners at the store. In the late 1880s, Rev. Smith and 19 charter members met in L. Jasper and Mary Ann Townsen's home to organize Pleasant Valley Cumberland Presbyterian Church, now Adamsville Presbyterian Church. Samuel and Fannie Straley platted Adamsville in 1908. A newspaper article the following year mentioned Adamsville's ice house, Ladies' Missionary Society, Literary Society, and Woodmen of the World Camp. Straley's School (c. 1885) was also the church for Baptist and Presbyterian congregations. County commissioners created Adamsville School District No. 15 in 1908 and trustees built a new schoolhouse; a larger 1922 schoolhouse was destroyed by fire in 1942. Adamsville consolidated with Lampasas Schools in 1964. The Adamsville community building was originally a G.I. vocational school for veterans of World War II. J.W. Mitchell organized the Adamsville volunteer fire department about 1967. Adamsville has evolved from a frontier settlement to an active rural community with ongoing events such as church activities, twice-monthly fiddling jam sessions, and community barbecues to welcome hunters during deer season. 175 Years of Texas Independence * 1836 - 2011 Marker is Property of the State of Texas

16687 US 281, Adamsville, TX, United States

Illinois Bend School Located in the bend of the Red River in northeast Montague County, Illinois Bend received an official title in 1877. By the 1890's, Illinois Bend was a thriving community where cotton farming swelled the population. Many churches and schools were conducted in private homes prior to 1845 when the Masonic Grand Lodge of Texas set aside provisions to aid local lodges in erecting educational buildings. In January 1893, a Masonic building for fraternal, educational and spiritual purposes was erected here. During the week, the lower level was used as a one room school and a church on Sundays. The original name of the school district was Valley Branch School District No. 14 due to the location near the branch which feeds into the Red River. Over time, it became known as Illinois Bend School District No. 14. All age levels were taught in the same room and the first teacher was W.O. Edwards. There was no electricity or plumbing i the school until 1945 so outhouses were erected behind the building. The lower portion of the building was also the social center of the community, hosting reunion, wedding receptions and other group activities. With the onset of WWII, the school closed in 1944. Church services in the lower leel ceased in the 1920s with the establishment of local churches. In 1968, the building was no longer used on a regular basis; however, an Illinois Bend Community Homecoming was held each fall and continues today. The building was refurbished by the Illinois Bend Community Club in 1987 and is a remnant of the community partnerships formed with the help of the Masonic Lodge. Marker is Property of the State of Texas (2014)

, Saint Jo, United States

Negro Fine Arts School Twenty years before the integration of the Georgetown public school district, a progressive music professor and her three students embarked on a program to explore a new musical teaching theory and give African American children a chance to learn music. In the fall of 1946, Southwestern University professor Iola Bowden Chambers and her students began teaching piano lessons to children in the African American community. Through the cooperation of the Georgetown school board, the First Methodist Church of Georgetown and the Christian Student Association of Southwestern University, the Negro Fine Arts School was funded and championed. During the school’s existence, the First Methodist Church, which housed the school, welcomed over 200 students through its doors who participated in the program. The school expanded to provide voice and art lessons, produced a recital at the end of every year, and provided scholarships to its students. The scholarship program provided assistance for every year the recipient was enrolled in college. The school also produced several distinguished alumni who pursued degrees in music and taught other young aspiring musicians. The Negro Fine Arts School not only provided musical avenues and self esteem for its students, but opportunities for other community members to interact with African Americans and to understand the injustice of racial segregation. The Negro Fine Arts School introduced children to the universal language of music and helped pave the way for peaceful school integration that would begin in 1965. (2009)

410 E. University Avenue, Georgetown, TX, United States

Fort Worth Belt Railway Beginning in 1904, the Belt Railway serviced the Fort Worth Stock Yards. The arrival of the railroad in Fort Worth in 1876 moved the cow town from a regional economic player to a national force. The Stockyards Corporation, chartered in 1895, created a belt railway system to handle the movement of livestock and supplies into the yards and finished products out to the national market. As road traffic grew in the mid-1920s, the Belt's role began to diminish. By 1978, the Texas & Pacific and the Missouri Pacific railroads gained full control of the Belt. In 1988, the Fort Worth and Western Railroad purchased what was left of the Belt. The remaining two miles of line are not used as an access route by an excursion train to the National Historic District. Marker is property of the State of Texas (2014)

Exchange Avenue, Fort Worth, TX, United States

Subjects
Beulah A. Harriss Beulah A. Harriss (1889-1977) moved to Denton in 1914 from Nebraska to become the first women’s physical education teacher at North Texas State Normal College, now University of North Texas (UNT). With a degree from the University of Nebraska in physical education, Harriss coached the university’s first women’s athletic teams and instructed every sport except football. She organized the physical education department in 1918, which grew under her direction, and the green jackets club, whose purpose was to support all activities of the college. Harriss was a founder in 1923 of the Texas State Physical Education Association (now Texas Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance), serving as president in 1933. She was also a founder of the Texas Woman’s Athletic Association in 1924. Established in 1928 at UNT, Harriss was one of twelve charter members of the RHO Chapter of Delta Psi Kappa, a national fraternity for the promotion of interests in the field of physical education. She was named honorary national president in 1960. The first recognized Girl Scout in Texas, Harriss started the first troop at the College in Denton in 1917. She helped build the scout lodge at hills and hollows in South Denton in 1923. Harriss and 12 other professors from the college were charter members of the Denton County Teachers Federal Credit Union in 1936, now DACTU. After 46 years at UNT as a teacher and women’s athletics activist, Harriss retired in 1960. She was inducted into the North Texas Athletic Hall of Fame in 1987, 10 years after her death. Harriss devoted her life to the youth and citizens of Denton and is remembered each February 27th on Beulah Harriss day. The Girl Scout little house stood near this site. Marker is Property of the State of Texas (2014)

700 Oakland St., Denton, TX, United States

American Paint Horse Association Spanish conquistadors in the 16th century brought two-toned horses with them, descendants of horses from North Africa and Asia Minor. Over time, these colorful horses became a cherished staple of the western frontier. Throughout the 1800s and early 1900s, these horses were known by a variety of names, including Paint, Pinto, Skewbald and Piebald. In the early 20th century, they were largely excluded from registries in North America. At the Curtwood Motel in Gainesville on February 16, 1962, sixteen dedicated horsemen and horsewomen met to discuss a new association dedicated to colorful stock horses. The group determined a new equine breed registry was needed. Christened the American Paint Stock Horse Association (APSHA), the new organization’s directives were to collect, preserve and record the pedigrees of paint stock horses; publish a stud book; maintain a registry; and regulate the breed’s exhibition, publicity, sales and racing. The first registered American Paint Horse, Bandit’s Pinto, was registered on August 11, 1962. By the end of the year, 250 paint horses were registered and the association counted 150 members. In the 1960s, a second paint horse registry, the American Paint Quarter Horse Association (APQHA), opened its doors. The two associations merged in May 1965; from that point, it was known as the American Paint Horse Association (APHA). The APHA is the world’s second-largest equine breed association, registering more than a million horses in 59 nations and territories since it was founded. APHA preserves the history of the American Paint Horse, creates and maintains programs that increase the value of the breed and enriches members' experiences with their horse. (2013) Marker is Property of the State of Texas

305 I-35, Gainesville, TX, United States