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Park Royal station Listed building of National Significance Architect: Landers & Welsh, 1936 This impressive building situated on Western Avenue, one of the arterial roads built in the 1930s, replaced an earlier station further to the west that had opened in 1905. It was designed, especially the imposing tower with the illuminated roundels, to be a landmark showing the importance of the Underground in the new suburban landscape. Although influenced by the work of the Underground’s architect, Charles Holden, the station is unique. The main elements of the design - the staircases, the circular ticket hall ‘drum’, and the tower - are carefully integrated with the parade of shops and adjoining flats that form part of the design.

Western Avenue, London, United Kingdom

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Sudbury Town station Listed building of National Significance Architect: Adams, Holden & Pearson Partners, 1932 The original station opened on 28 June 1903 on the Metropolitan District Railway extension from Ealing Common to South Harrow. It was rebuilt in preparation of the transfer of services to the Piccadilly line on 4 July 1932. Sudbury Town seen as one of the seminal works of the architect Charles Holden and as such it set many of the elements for the other Underground stations he was to design in the 1930s. It saw the move away from the use of Portland stone, as had been seen on his previous designs for stations such as Ealing Common, towards a more European idiom based on unadorned concrete and brick that was a real change in British architecture of the day. It is viewed by many many as being one of Britain’s best buildings of the time. The main structure consists of a red Buckinghamshire brisk ‘box’, flanked by single storey extension and all topped by concrete flat roof. Each facade is punctuated by a large vertical window that allows natural daylight to flood in and at night, be illuminated - making the building, as intended, a beacon in suburbia. The design also integrates the overbridge and other buildings. The ticket hall still retains much of the original decor including the timber passimeter and, on the platforms, the original designs for concrete fencing and lampposts are still used. Some of the signs on the station make use of the rare, serrifed variation of the traditional Underground Johnstone typeface.

Station Approach, London, United Kingdom

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Sudbury Hill station Listed as a building of National Significance Architect: Adams, Holden & Pearson Partners, 1932 The original station opened on 28 June 1903 on the Metropolitan District Railway extension from Ealing Common to South Harrow. It was rebuilt in preparation of the transfer of services to the Piccadilly line on 4 July 1932. This new extension was, together with the existing tracks back to Acton Town, the first experimental section of the Underground’s surface lines to be electrified and operated electric instead of steam trains. Sudbury Hill was to see the full development of the format and style Charles Holden had designed as Sudbury Town station in 1931, which he was to use for the majority of Underground stations during the 1930s. The main structure consists of a red brick ‘box’, topped with a flat concrete roof. The high ticket hall is illuminated by a large vertical window within each facade and an Underground roundel, with original graphics, is inset into the glazing above the entrance. The design of the rest of the building deliberately integrates the overbridge, staircases to platforms and the waiting room accommodation into the overall architectural idiom. The station still remains much of the original decor with the use of timber and bronze finishes for seats, poster frames and telephone booths. However, the original passimeter (ticket booth) has since been replaced by a modern ticketing system.

Greenford Road, London, United Kingdom

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Uxbridge Station Listed as a building of National Significance Architect: Leonard H. Bucknell and Charles Holden, 1938 The Metropolitan Railway first opened a station at Uxbridge on 4th July 1904 on Belmont Road, a short distance to the north of the existing station. On 1 March 1910 an extension of the District line from South Harrow to connect wth the Metropolitan Railway at Rayners Lane was opened, enabling District line trains to serve station between Rayners Lane and Uxbridge. The original Belmont Road station had two platforms and after the introduction of shared operation each line had one platform each. District line services to Uxbridge were replaced by Piccadilly line trains in October 1933. On 4 December 1938 a new station was opened on a new alignment. The station designed by Bucknell and Holden features a red brick curved facade with paired sculptures over the entrance representing stylised wheels with leaf springs. The forecourt of the new station was originally laid out to provide a turning circle for trolleybuses, which prefaced trams in 1936. A tall concrete canopy, similar to the one at Cockfosters, arches over the tracks with a a row of clerestory windows above the platforms. The stained glass panels at the booking hall end of the platforms were produced by the artist Ervin Bossanyi, and depict the crown and three seaxes. On a red background are the arms of the county of Middlesex. The chained swan on a black and red background is associated with Buckinghamshire. The centre shield is possibly the arms of the local Bassett family (a downward pointing red triangle on a gold background was borrowed from the Bassett arms for use on the arms of Uxbridge Urban District Council in 1948). The station was Grade II listed on 12 January 1983.

High Street, Uxbridge, United Kingdom

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Remembrance of the civilians and London Transport staff who were killed at this station during the Blitz on the night of 14 October 1940

Balham High Road, London, United Kingdom

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Lancaster Gate platforms Architect Harry Bell Measures , 1900 These platforms were the last substantial examples of the original Central London Railway design dating from the opening of this section of the line in 1900. In keeping with this original design, London Underground has used plain white tiles during the modernisation of this station in 2006. The original tiles can still be seen at high level on both platforms, above the track.

Lancaster Gate, Bayswater Road, London, United Kingdom

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