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Annesley Hall Victoria University This building, named in honour of Susannah Annesley, mother of John Wesley, was built as a residence for women students and officially opened on October 1, 1903. It was designed by George M. Miller in an eclectic style sometimes referred to as "Jacobethan". The initiative to provide for "the Daughters of Methodism" a home of "high moral tone" in an "atmosphere of refined social culture" was taken by Margaret Burwash (wife of Victoria's chancellor of the day), with the able help of Lillian Massey, Margaret Cox and other prominent Methodist women in the community who were known as the Victoria Women's Residence and Educational Association (forerunner of the modern-day Victoria Women's Association). Their tireless efforts raised funds from individuals, the City of Toronto, and congregations far and wide to buy the site from the University of Toronto, furnish the residence, and later help with its upkeep. The building itself, which originally boasted a gymnasium, infirmary, and dining room in addition to residence facilities, was financed in large part by a gift from the estate of Hart M. Massey (father of Lillian) whose generosity to Victoria also made possible the later construction of Burwash Hall for men. In late August, 1988, the building was closed for a year of major renovation and restoration work during which the dining room and kitchen areas were converted to bedroom space thus enabling more students to experience residence life at Victoria. Alumni and friends contributed $400,000 through the heritage fund to give the venerable old building a new lease on life, and help defray the $4 million cost of the renovations. Annesley Hall was reopened in September 1989 and officially rededicated on October 21 of the same year.

Charles Street West, Toronto, ON, Canada

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Burwash Hall Victoria University Burwash Hall initially consisted of four houses of residence (north, middle, gate and south) for the men students of Victoria College, an adjoining dining hall, and a senior common room for faculty. Completed in 1913, these buildings were designed in the "Collegiate Gothic" style by Sproatt and Rolph, a prominent architectural firm of the period. Burwash Hall was a gift from the estate of Hart Massey who attended Victoria College in its very early years from 1842 to 1845 when the college was located in Cobourg, Ontario. as directed by Massey's executors, the complex was named after the Rev. Nathanael Burwash, STD, LL.D., chancellor and president of Victoria University from 1887 to 1913. In 1931, the same architects supervised the completion of five additional houses (Ryerson, Nelles, Caven, Gandier, and Bowles) for students of divinity at the university's Emmanuel College which had been founded just three years earlier in 1928. These additions were made possible largely through gifts from individuals and pastoral charges in the United Church of Canada. In 1988, after being closed for a year of extensive renovation and restoration work, the Burwash Dining Hall wing was reopened to serve the entire Victoria community including its women residents who had until then taken their meals in separate dining facilities.

Charles Street West, Toronto, ON, Canada