Dorothy Hodgkin OM FRS FRIC
(1910-1994)

Died aged 84

Dorothy Mary Hodgkin OM FRS (12 May 1910 – 29 July 1994), known professionally as Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin or simply Dorothy Hodgkin, was a British biochemist who developed protein crystallography, for which she won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1964. She advanced the technique of X-ray crystallography, a method used to determine the three-dimensional structures of biomolecules. Among her most influential discoveries are the confirmation of the structure of penicillin that Ernst Boris Chain and Edward Abraham had previously surmised, and then the structure of vitamin B12, for which she became the third woman to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. In 1969, after 35 years of work and five years after winning the Nobel Prize, Hodgkin was able to decipher the structure of insulin. X-ray crystallography became a widely used tool and was critical in later determining the structures of many biological molecules where knowledge of structure is critical to an understanding of function. She is regarded as one of the pioneer scientists in the field of X-ray crystallography studies of biomolecules.

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Commemorated on 5 plaques

Dorothy Hodgkin 1910-1994 biochemist and Nobel Laureate who determined the structure of penicillin and vitamin B12 studied at this school 1921-1928

John Leman Grammar School, Beccles, United Kingdom where they studied

This plaque commemorates a life's work for mankind by Dr Dorothy Hodgkin OM FRS 1910-1994 Nobel Prize Winner 1964 Freeman of Beccles 1965 A former pupil of Sir John Leman Grammar School

John Leman Grammar School, Beccles, United Kingdom where they was

Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin OM FRS (1910-1994) led pioneering work in this building from 1956-1972 and elsewhere in Oxford on the structures of antibiotics, vitamins and proteins including penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin, using X-ray diffraction techniques for which she received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1964.

University of Oxford Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford, United Kingdom where they was

The work of Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin at the University of Oxford. In this building from 1956-1972 and at other times elsewhere in the Oxford Science Area, Professor Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (1910-1994) OM FRS Nobel Laueate led pioneering work on the structure of antibiotics, vitamins and proteins, including pencillin, vitamin B12 and insulin, using X-ray diffraction techniques. Many methods for solving crystal structure were developed taking advantage of digital computers from the earliest days. The work provided a basis for much of present day molecular structure driven molecular biology and medicinal chemistry

Dyson Perrins Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom where they was (1956-1972)

Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin OM FRS 1910-1994 Crystallographer Nobel Laureate in Chemistry lived here 1957-1968

94 Woodstock Road, Oxford, United Kingdom where they lived