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Beeville, TX

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Evergreen Cemetery. Block 1, Beeville original townsite, donated 1859 by Anne Burke. First owned by G.W. McClanahan, land was bought 1862 by county for "Public Burying Ground". In 1872, H.W. Wilson donated northeast strip, land was added on the northwest, and Court gave consent for a fence. Cemetery was restored in 1970. (1970) #1512

?, Beeville, TX, United States
#1512 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Beeville on the Poesta. Long before Mexico granted land (1834) on Poesta Creek to the first settlers, Anne Burke and James Heffernan, savage Indians roamed this valley at will. Their colony, although successful at first, soon met disaster. In 1836 James Heffernan, his brother John, and John Ryan, who had planned to join Texas patriots at Goliad, were planting a crop in a field at this site when they were massacred by Comanches. Also killed was James' family, in his picket house upcreek. Bee County was organized in 1858 and named for Col. Barnard E. Bee, a Republic of Texas statesman. Soon after, choice of a county seat came into hot dispute. A site seven miles east, on Medio Creek, was chosen for "Beeville". But ten months later, voters made the 150-acre donation of Anne Burke "O'Carroll permanent county seat, on the banks on the Poesta. The new town, first called "Maryville" for Mary Heffernan (relative of those killed in 1836) was soon renamed Beeville. In its first decade, it had two stores, one saloon, and a blacksmith shop. First courthouse was built for $750 on west side of present square, 1860. First railroad came through, 1866, and a larger courthouse was soon built. After it burned, the present one was erected in 1913. (1967) #354

?, Beeville, TX, United States
#354 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Cadiz Baptist Church. This congregation, orginally known as Lapara Baptist Church, was organized on Aug. 12, 1877, by 32 charter members. Services were held under a brush arbor and in a schoolhouse before a sanctuary was erected on Lapara Creek. The building was moved here in 1920, and the church was renamed for the Cadiz settlement. The facility later was enlarged to accommodate the growing church. In 1960 the congregation won the Rural Church of the Year award. In recent years the church has aided disaster victims and supported ministerial students and Christian crusades. (1983) #619

?, Beeville, TX, United States
#619 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Camp-Ezell House. A settler's "box" home built of Florida longleaf pine from house razed by Robert A. Ezell in Old St. Mary's. One of the structure's three chimneys served as a flue for two cooking units: kitchen stove and dining room fireplace. Ezell (1845-1936), a stonemason, built at this creek site in 1892. His wife Sara Jane, daughter of influential legislator L.B. Camp, was born at Mission San Jose, San Antonio. Six Ezell sons formed a popular orchestra, 1895 to 1904. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1971 #683

1313 W. Flournoy, Beeville, TX, United States
#683 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Captain A.C. Jones. One of builders of Southwest. Born in Nacogdoches County, son of very early settlers. Became a cattleman; served as sheriff of Goliad County in 1858-1860. In Civil War cavalry of Col. John S. "Rip" Ford for 4 years. Fought at Palmito Hill, war's last battle, 34 days after the surrender of Gen. Robt E. Lee. In 1886, raised $75,000 to build SA and AP railroad from San Antonio to Beeville. Aided in getting GH and SA to extend line form Victoria here in 1890. Was county treasurer, banker and the president and general manager of Beeville Oil Mill. (1965) #707

?, Beeville, TX, United States
#707 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Cook Home. Built by John Cook, who was born 1846 in Texas-bound wagon train; at 17 was in Civil War; in 1866 married Frances Miller. Lived in rock house, near this site. With son, R.J., contributed much to area cattle industry, with fine registered Herefords. House, erected 1897 of select long-leaf pine, placed to catch Gulf breezes. Each room opens on a porch. Has 4 fireplaces, with mantels of mahogany, maple, oak. Architecture is Victorian. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1966 #1050

1001 W. Cook, Beeville, TX, United States
#1050 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Early Trails in Bee County. From pack trails and wagon roads that marked this area at least 300 years, have developed such modern roads as U.S. Highway 181. The old trails of Indians, wild cattle and mustang horses formed highways for 17th, 18th and 19th century expeditions coming from Mexico to claim sovereignty for Spain over land of Texas. When pioneers established land grants in this section, they also found Indian trails useful, placing towns along them. Beeville, the county seat, was situated at the natural intersection of San Patricio-Helena Road with Goliad-Laredo Road. About 20 miles south, the Matamoros-Goliad road ("Camino Real" to old-timbers) was probably the most historic road in this area. In the years 1861-1865 the "cotton road"--called "lifeline of the southern Confederacy"--crossed Bee County. A later route of great value was a cattle trail that channeled thousands of Longhorns from the Rio Grande to the Red River and up the Dodge City Trail or the Chisholm Trail to northern markets. In this area were also La Para (or Grapevine) Road; the Indianola-Papalote Road; and a road to now vanished St. Mary's, a port on Copano Bay, off the Gulf of Mexico. (1968) #1359

?, Beeville, TX, United States
#1359 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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First Baptist Church of Beeville. This church was organized in 1869 as the Beeville Baptist Church. Its first sanctuary was built near Poesta Creek in 1871. The congregation grew quickly, emerging as the largest among the 39 members of the regional Blanco Baptist Association by 1876. The congregation changed its name to First Baptist Church of Beeville about 1887. Through the efforts of the Rev. J.M. Sallee and his family, the church began tradition of extensive foreign missionary work about 1900. The congregation built its fourth sanctuary at this site in 1957. (1993) #1615

600 N. St. Mary's St., Beeville, TX, United States
#1615 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Thompson Building (First Brick Building on Square). Victorian architecture. Built 1892 by grocer J.C. Thompson (1836-1905) of brick from Calavaros Kiln near Elmendorf. Upstairs in 1892 was law office of Lon C. Hill, who later founded Harlingen. Afterward on second floor was "Beeville Light Guard" Armory. Acquired in 1910 by Eureka Telephone Company, was communications headquarters (1912-20) for Southwestern Telegraph & Telephone Company, and then for Southwestern Bell until 1957. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1971 #1692

108 W. Corpus Christi, Beeville, TX, United States
#1692 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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First Methodist Church of Beeville. In 1861, three years after Bee County was organized, the Rev. Berry Merchant of Corpus Christi assisted Beeville Methodists in establishing the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Between 1862 and 1870, circuit-riding preachers ministered to the congregation, and worship services were often held in Bee County's original courthouse, a small wood-frame structure. The congregation erected its first sancturary, a wood-frame building, in the early 1870s at the corner of Bowie and Monroe streets. In 1904, the congregation relocated to this site and built a Gothic structure with stained glass windows. It was replaced with a newer and larger worship facility in 1955. The congregation was part of the Corpus Christi Methodist District almost continually until 1891, when Beeville itself became a district headquarters. A district parsonage was maintained until 1927, when the city again was absorbed into the Corpus Christi District. Denominational mergers caused the congregation to change its name to the First Methodist Church in 1939 and to the First United Methodist Church in 1968. It continues to play an active role in the religious life of this community. (1991) #1747

106 E. Cleveland St., Beeville, TX, United States
#1747 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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First National Bank of Beeville. Beeville, the county seat of the Bee County since 1860, did not have a secure bank until 1890, when the First National Bank of Beeville opened for business. Prior to that year, the town's only banking facility was A.C. Jones' general store, where some area residents stored money under a loose floorboard behind the counter. The increases in population and trade volume brought by the arrival of the San Antonio & Aransas Pass and the Gulf, Western Texas & Pacific Railways in the late 1880s made the establishment of a bank necessary. In December of 1889 thirty investors met and organized the First National Bank of Beeville and elected A.C. Jones, Louis B. Randall, B.W. Klipstein, J.H. O'Connor, Viggo Kohler, J.C. Wood and J.R. Hoxie to the first board of directors. The First National Bank of Beeville operated on the courthouse square until 1894, when it relocated to the vicinty of the railroad depot. Functioning at that site for 66 years, the bank moved in 1960 and again in 1984 to be near major auto routes. It is one of the few banks in South Texas to have been independent and locally owned and operated for one hundred years. (1992) #1790

1400 E. Houston St., Beeville, TX, United States
#1790 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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George Home. Built in 1890 by Will H. and Julia George of materials from early house on land inherited from her father, Maj. J.H. Wood (Texas Cattle Empire Builder) who came from New York to join Texas War for Independence. Remodeled in 1900, house is raised cottage architecture andhas elegantly detailed interior woodwork. Many social and cultural functions were held here at turn of century. Present owner is Mrs. Mary M. Welder, a wood descendant. #2155

801 N. Adams, Beeville, TX, United States
#2155 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Jim Little Homestead. On 59 Ranch, granted to Little in1873, grazed earlier by his cattle. Home built about 1870, of cypress and heart pine that came by steamer from Florida to St. Mary's, then by ox-cart to site. Kiln on ranch made lime for early-type cement. Good water well, country store, made this a campsite for such travelers as Mexican horse traders. A stage stop on San Antonio-Brownsville road until railroad came into area, 1886. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1966 #2754

?, Beeville, TX, United States
#2754 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Medio Creek. Named by the Spaniards about 1800 because of its midway position between the San Antonio and Nueces Rivers. Rises in Karnes County; empties into Mission River. Crossed by explorers, padres, soldiers, settlers who traveled on three early ox-cart roads that led from Mexico to Mission La Bahia at Goliad. The Cart War of 1857, between Texas and Mexican teamsters on the freight route between San Antonio and Gulf ports, originated along San Patricio Road, southernmost of the three roads. The Mexican cart drivers used mesquite beans as feed for their teams, starting the mesquite brush which thrives along creek. Settlers were attracted here by the tall grass, and many veterans of the Texas Revolution were given bounty lands in the area. First post office in Bee County was established in 1857 at Medio Hill pioneer community, once a down-creek settlement. In 1909, the town of Candlish was founded within 50 feet of here, with a hotel, general store, school. The store closed; Candlish became a ghost town. In 1938-39 on Medio and Blanco creeks, fossil beds yielded 1,000,000-year-old fossils of a new mastodon species (named Buckner's Mastodon), rhinoceros, elephants, alligators, camels and three-toed horses. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1967 Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1967 #3315

?, Beeville, TX, United States
#3315 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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McClanahan House. Oldest business structure in Beeville, erected about 1867 on east side of courthouse square, near Poesta Creek. General store, lodging house, post office. Pioneer western style, with southern porches. Built by G.W. McClanahan, Beeville's first merchant, school teacher, postmaster, county clerk, inn keeper, Sunday School superintendent. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1964 #3840

206 E. Corpus Christi St., Beeville, TX, United States
#3840 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Papalote Creek. A few yards south passes Papalote Creek, crossed by the fierce Karankawa Indians who found kite-shaped pebbles and named it Papalote, which means "kite-shaped" or "wing-shaped". Along its banks came the leaders of the Power and Hewetson colonists, holding Mexican land grants in the 1830's. On its Rata tributary there is evidence the Mexican Army camped on its way to suppress the Texas Revolution. By 1857 the town of Papalote had emerged. It was the center of entertainment for the county, boasting of a circular dance hall built by cowboys trading steer yearlings at $3 a head for lumber. There were rooster fights, ring tournaments and horse races. In 1886, when the railroad came, the town was booming. After the turn of the century, however, Papalote began to die away. A land company sold lots to settlers from as far away as Hawaii. Expecting to grow citurs fruits, they were disillusioned when the first killing frost doomed the project. Threats of Pancho Villa's raids continued as late as 1916, when women and children hid in a brick schoolhouse. In 1948, Main Street was bypassed by U.S. Highway 181. Today there is no post office--only a rural route for the few remaining households. (1965) #3934

?, Beeville, TX, United States
#3934 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Praeger Building. San Antonio businessman Albert Praeger (1864-1930) moved to Beeville in the 1890s to open a hardware store and tin shop. He built this Romanesque Revival structure in 1906 to house his business, which included buggies and wagons as well as barbed wire and tools. In 1925 when Sam Mitchell became store manager, the second floor storage space was converted into apartments. Since the turn of the century, this has been a landmark on the courthouse square. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1981 #4104

110 W. Corpus Christi St., Beeville, TX, United States
#4104 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Rountree Rock House. On land bought 1875 by Joseph Gustave Rountree (1838-80), who planned house before his death. Built 1881 by his young widow, Elizabeth Cornelia, with aid of her father, John Stillwell. The lumber was Florida pine, hauled from Rockport. Stone, quarried as caliche and hardened by the air, came fron nearby Mulas Hills. Structure has withstood major stoms and is still owned by descendants: Adele Rountree, Ann Marie Rountree Anderson and sons. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1971 #4364

?, Beeville, TX, United States
#4364 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Saint Joseph's Catholic Church. The emergence of this church is associated with Catholic services held by itinerant missionaries in the homes of predominantly Irish settlers located along the texas Gulf Coast in the late 1840s. The oldest written record of St. Joseph's Catholic church dates to 1876. The first church structure, built in 1891, became the site of regular services by the Rev. Raymond Monclus in 1893. St. Mary's Academy, opened by the Sisters of Divine Providence here in 1896,was replaced by St.Joseph's Parochial School in 1931. A new church building was erected in 1992 to serve growing membership. (1992) #4457

609 E. Gramman St., Beeville, TX, United States
#4457 of the Texas Historical Marker series
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Saint Philip's Episcopal Church. First Unit, transept, built 1893 on this site purchased in 1890 from heirs of G.W. McClanahan. In 1910, nave added with funds from sale of block of land given to the missionary jusidiction of Western Texas by English born H.W. Wilson, 1888. Early members donated furnishings, bell tower and 1896 inscribed memorial bell. First Protestant parochial school in county was organized here in 1954. Gothic design retained in 1964 renovation. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1967 #4487

?, Beeville, TX, United States
#4487 of the Texas Historical Marker series

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