United States / Brackettville, TX

all or unphotographed
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Old Guard House. -- #3738

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Robert E. Lee Building. -- #4295

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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8 Medallions on Officers' Row Quarters. -- #17

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Brackettville, 1688. #264

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Catholic Church. -- #761

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Commanding Officer's Quarters. Fort Clark was established as a U.S. Army garrison in June 1852. Nine structures designed by U.S. Army engineers were built in 1873-1874 to house the fort's officers. This house served the fort's commanding officers, including Col. Ranald S. Mackenzie and Gen. Jonathan M. Wainwright. Architectural features include a central entry, wood-frame porch, six-over-six windows, second floor dormers, and four large chimneys with sculpted caps. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1963 #1001

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Dolores Townsite. Only settlement founded in John Charles Beales' ill-fated Rio Grande colony of 1834-1836. Beales (1804-1878) -- empresario of 70,000,000 acres in present Southern and Western Texas and New Mexico -- was Texas' largest known land king. In 1833 he and a partner brought 59 settlers here to colonize a town to be named for Beales' Mexican wife. Indian raids and drouth soon took their toll, but the death blow came in 1836. As the group fled the Mexican Army during the Texas Revolution, Comanches killed all but 7 of one party. This ended the town's existence. (1970) #1243

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Fort Clark Guardhouse. Established in 1852, Fort Clark was manned by varying troop strengths over the years. This guardhouse was built in the 1870s during a period of fort expansion. A new stockade was built in 1942 to relieve overcrowding, and the guardhouse became headquarters for the military police. Built of limestone blocks, the building reflects an adoption of military design to local materials and climate, and retains its 1930s appearance. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1962 #1976

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Las Moras Masonic Lodge Building. -- #3040

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Montalvo House. Yldefonso Montalvo (1855-1941), also known by the name Obed Woods, built this dwelling about 1887. He used cedar pickets, caliche plaster, and other materials available in the area. Originally the kitchen and several outbuildings stood nearby. The educated son of an English mother and Mexican father, Montalvo was a rancher and an employee of Fort Clark and a local mercantile store. He and his wife Guadalupe (Reschman) (1868-1953) and their nine children lived here. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1979 #3440

103 E. Thomas Street, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Seminole Indian Scouts' Cemetery. (Founded on Fort Clark Reservation, Sept. 1, 1872) Burial site of heroic U.S. Army men, families, and heirs. These Seminoles came mainly from Florida about 1850; lived in northern Mexico or Texas; joined Lt. (later a general) John L. Bullis and Col. Ranald S. Mackenzie in ridding Texas of hostile Indians, 1870s. (1971) Incise on plate on back of marker: The following are among the many scouts buried here: John Bowlegs, Elijah Daniels, Pompey Factor, Renty Grayson, John Jefferson, Billy July, Sampson July, George Kibbit, Issac Payne, Pompey Perryman, Joseph Phillips, Billie Wilson, Issac Wilson, Kelina Wilson. #4638

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Partrick Building. In 1885 Dr. William Partrick commissioned adjoining commercial spaces at this site, operating a drug store in the single story and a dry goods store and hotel in the two-story section. Later outbuildings included a beer vault, windmill, elevated tank and bake oven. Dr. Partrick sold the property to R. Stratton & Co. in 1913. The Partrick Building exhibits the skill of local stonemasons in rough-cut ashlar limestone blocks and finished limestone lintels and windowsills. By the 1950s, a suspended wooden awning replaced the original metal balcony and a stabilizing concrete veneer at the base addressed recurring flood damage. #15039

114 North Street, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Staff Officers' Quarters. The U.S. Army built nine stone officers' quarters at Fort Clark beginning in 1873. The need soon arose for additional housing for senior staff officers, and this building was constructed in 1888. Built in a T-plan, the two-story stone duplex features a full width front porch and is a good example of military standard housing adapted to the materials and climate of the region. Among the house's residents was General George S. Patton. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1990 #5086

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Fort Clark. A strategic installation in the U.S. Army's line of forts along the military road stretching from San Antonio to El Paso, Fort Clark was established in June 1852. Located near natural springs and Las Moras Creek, its site was considered a point of primary importance to the defense of frontier settlements and control of the U.S. Mexico border. Many infantry regiments and almost all cavalry regiments were at one time based at Fort Clark, as well as companies of Texas Rangers and Confederate troops during the Civil War. The Army's Seminole-Negro Indian Scouts also were assigned to Fort Clark, and with black troops of the 10th Cavalry and 24th and 25th infantry played a decisive role in the Indian campaigns of the 1870s. Prominent military leaders who served here include Col. Ranald S. Mackenzie, Gen. Wesley Merritt, Gen. William R. Shafter, Gen. John L. Bullis, Gen. Zenas R. Bliss, Gen. Jonathan M. Wainwright, and Gen. George S. Patton, Jr. Fort Clark remained a horse-cavalry post for the U.S. Army through World War II and finally was inactivated in 1946. The fort property, including many native stone buildings constructed by civilian craftsmen in the 1870s, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. (1994) #1975

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Fort Clark, U.S.A.. 1852-1946 Founded June, 1852. Guarded California road, rebuffed Indians, outlaws. Named for Maj. J. B. Clark, killed in Mexican War. Companies of infantry, artillery, cavalry stationed here. Clothing issued proved too warm for summer. Buildings were too cold for winter until chimneys were built in 1856. Troops routed Indians to Pecos River mouth, helped expel bandit Cortinas from Brownsville, 1859 Union gave up Clark, 1861, after Texas seceded -- re- occupied it 1866. Used Seminole Scout Company. Indian reservation established near post. Duty here, decade after Civil War, was said to be equivalent to honorable mention. Practically all U.S. Cavalry regiments served here. 5th Cavalry served 1920-41. In World War II, 2nd and 11th Cavalry trained here. Post inactivated Feb. 9, 1946. Erected by the State of Texas 1963 #2079

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Catholic Church. #14206

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Fort Clark Post Theater. Constructed in 1932, this building replaced an earlier Fort Clark Post Hall that served as a church, courtroom, theater, and recreational center. A utilitarian military design of clear span construction, brick walls, and a stucco veneer, the building also exhibits classical style influences in its pilasters, arched windows, and pediment. A popular movie theater until the fort was closed in 1944, it later became a town hall for the Fort Clark Springs community. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1997 #12002

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Filippone Building. Filippone Building Italian stonemasons Giovanni B. Filippone (1845-1917) and Giovanni Cassinelli purchased property here in 1883-85 and in 1885 built the six-sided portion of this limestone block building. Filippone became sole owner in 1887 and operated a general store on the first floor, while his family lived on the second floor. The five-sided, one-story section was added early in the 20th century. Abandoned by the 1940s, the Filippone Building underwent rehabilitation in the 1990s and now stands as an important reminder of Brackettville's commercial heritage. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2001 #12735

El Paso and Brown Streets, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Seminole Scout Camp on Fort Clark. Seminole Scout Camp on Fort Clark Under Spanish rule, Florida was a haven for freed or escaped slaves in the 1700s. Once there, many integrated into the Seminole tribe, intermarrying and adapting to the culture. Florida became a U.S. territory in 1821, and after approximately 30 years of warfare, the majority of the Seminoles were forced to relocate to the Indian Territory (Oklahoma). Tribal leaders Coacoochee (Wild Cat) and John Horse gathered a group of Seminoles in 1850 and left the Indian Territory for Mexico. There, under an agreement with the Mexican government, they Settled and fought against raiding tribes along the Rio Grande. In 1870, the U.S. Army offered the group pay and rations to move to Fort Clark, established in 1852 to protect settlers along the border. The black Seminoles became scouts for the Army, serving under Lt. John L. Bullis and other noted officers during Texas' Indian wars. The Seminole-Negro Indian scouts, as they were known, lived on the fort in a settlement referred to as "the camp." They built homes in the Mexican jacal style, using wattle and daub construction and thatched roofs. The scouts and their families also built dams and irrigation systems along Las Moras Creek for farming. The Seminoles lived on the fort until 1914, when the scouts were disbanded. Some returned to Mexico, many stayed in the Brackettville area and some moved to Oklahoma, where the Seminole nation was granted sovereignty. Still others remained, buried in the scouts' cemetery (1.5 mi. Sw), which was established in 1872. Among those buried there are four scouts who earned Congressional medals of honor: Adam Payne (Paine), Isaac Payne, John Ward and Pompey Factor. (2002) #12933

US 90, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Married Officers' Quarters 8-9. This single-story duplex once served as housing for married officers and their families at Fort Clark. The U.S. Army fort, established in 1852 to defend the western frontier of Texas and the border with Mexico, saw significant growth in the 1870s. To accommodate a regimental size garrison, the Army constructed living quarters such as this particular house. Built by 1875 out of uncoursed, rough-cut limestone, the building features a cross-hipped roof, interior chimneys with double fireplaces and a distinctive U-shape. The fort closed in 1944 and later owners transformed the quarters into a single family home. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2006 #13643

8 Colony Row, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Officers Quarters 2-3 and 4. These two buildings date from 1854-55, soon after the U.S. Army established Fort Clark. The antebellum fort then included officers quarters and barracks for enlisted men, as well as a two-story quartermaster storehouse, powder magazine, hospital, guardhouse and post headquarters around a parade ground. During this period, such notable army officers as John Bell Hood, J.E.B. Stuart, Fitzhugh Lee and James Longstreet served here and likely lived in these quarters. Horizontal logs and vertical posts were notched and interlocked to create these buildings. Limestone chimneys are also historic. The army closed the fort in 1944, by which time the buildings were clad in lath and plaster and wood siding. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2007 #13963

2-3-4 Colony Row, Brackettville, TX, United States

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New Cavalry Barracks. #15811

123 McClernand Road, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Officers' Club Open Mess. #16424

1 McClernand Rd., Brackettville, TX, United States

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Adjutant's Quarters (Quarters # 20). Erected during the 1873-1875 expansion of Fort Clark to accommodate and support an entire regiment, this structure differs from other quarters on the line in that it is a single dwelling rather than a duplex. The Fifth Regiment of the U. S. Cavalry was garrisoned here from 1921 to 1941 and during that time the regimental adjutant, who performed essential clerical duties for the regimental commander, lived within these walls. The core of this building is a three-room hall and parlor plan composed of adobe, featuring a symmetrical front and stone chimney at each end. Additions were made in 1904 and 1944. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1999 #12001

20 Colony Row, Fort Clark Springs, Brackettville, TX, United States

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U.S. Army Signal Corps Building. U.S. Army Signal Corps Building. This building served as the communications center for Fort Clark from 1932-1944. The Building is of tile brick construction with a veneer of irregular cut field stone. The original footprint was enlarged c. 1940 to accommodate barracks for enlisted soldiers. During World War II mobilization, the 3rd Signal Troop of the 2nd Cavalry Division and the Signal Detachment of the 1855th Service Company shared this building and maintained the post telephone system, Army training film library, post photo lab, and other essential equipment. The Signal Corps detachment were the last troops to leave Fort Clark when it was closed on August 28, 1944. #15094

202 McClain Road, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Kinney County. KINNEY COUNTY FORMED FROM BEXAR COUNTY CREATED JANUARY 28, 1850 RECREATED FEBRUARY 2, 1856 ORGANIZED DECEMBER 3, 1869 NAMED IN HONOR OF HENRY L. KINNEY 1813-1861 FOUNDER OF CORPUS CHRISTI MEMBER OF THE FIRST STATE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION BRACKETTVILLE, COUNTY SEAT A LEADING WOOL AND MOHAIR PRODUCING COUNTY #2895

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Old Guardhouse - Fort Clark. -- #18

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Military Roads in Texas. The routes that moved troops in early Texas often followed old Indian trails, usually were little more than deep wagon ruts. This one, the Chihuahua Road joining Ft. Clark with other southwest posts -- was widely used, 1850-1880. The Comanche War Trail, part of the Chihuahua Road, carried women, children, and horses stolen by Indians from Mexico to the north. The Spanish era opened El Camino Real (the Old San Antonio Road) in 1691 to join Louisiana to Mexico. After 1836, Republic of Texas settlers demanded forts for safety from Indians; a main 1840 supply road followed present Austin-Dallas highway. Central National Road, 1844, linked Trinity and Red Rivers. (Its rules required all trees to be cut 12 inches or less from ground). From 1848 to 1860, surveys by U.S. led to a network of military roads in west central Texas. In 1849, Capt. Randolph B. Marcy blazed a West Texas trail used by California gold hunters. Famed U.S. 2nd Cavalry made Ft. Belknap - San Antonio Road a military artery in 1850s. During Civil War, supplies moved from Mexico to Texas over the cotton road. The Indian campaigns of Capt. R.S. Mackenzie in 1870s opened trails across the staked plains; but by 1881, the railroad had begun to replace Texas' once-famous military routes. (1968) #3377

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Ross Home. -- #4353

?, Brackettville, TX, United States

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Kinney County Courthouse. Kinney County Courthouse Human inhabitation of Kinney County began thousands of years ago. Spanish expeditions through the area began in 1535 and continued throughout subsequent centuries. An attempt at establishing a Franciscan mission in 1775 failed, as did settlement by Dr. John Charles Beales in 1834. Despite the hardships found in the area, Kinney County was carved out of Bexar County in 1850, two years before the U.S. Army opened Fort Clark as a frontier outpost. That same year, in 1852, local inhabitants established the Brackett settlement, named for Oscar B. Brackett who set up a stage stop, freight office and dry goods store to service the stage line from San Antonio to El Paso. Named for early settler and adventurer Henry Lawrence Kinney, Kinney County did not formally organize for 21 years; officials first met in Brackett's home in 1873. Brackettville, as the town had come to be called, was chosen as the county seat. Subsequent meetings were held in the Kartes and Co. building until 1879, when the county's first courthouse was built. The county used the 1879 building, which later housed a post office and Masonic lodge, until 1911. That year, the county first occupied this courthouse, designed by L.L. Thurmon and Co. of Dallas. Falls City Construction Co. of Louisville, Kentucky, served as General Contractor. The Kinney County Courthouse exhibits Beaux Arts Classicism. Detailing seen on the central bell tower is repeated on the octagonal corner towers and columned entryways. Buff brick is accented with D'Hanis red brick banding and corner quoins. The Seth Thomas clock in the bell tower completes the building, which, after some alterations, still demonstrates the massing, style and design selected by the early county commissioners. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2003 #13189

501 N. Ann St, Brackettville, TX, United States