Open Plaques
United States

Bryan, TX

See unphotographed plaques

Nophotosqr

Alexander Cemetery. There was a schoolhouse near this site in 1854 when, according to tradition, the first interment was made here. That early grave, for a child by the name of Whitley, had no marker and has been lost. This land was part of a one-league headright grant made on Oct. 15, 1832, by Mexico to George W. Singleton, who had come to Texas with the "Old 300" settlers of Stephen F. Austin. Two of Singleton's heirs, living in Washington County, on Oct. 2, 1856, deeded ten acres from the grant for the use and benefit of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. The Alexander Church building was then erected near the school, and burials were continued in the area. The earliest identifiable grave is that of one of the original trustees of the property, James Walker (1817-74). William Lawrence, another of the first trustees, was also buried here, in 1879. The Alexander Cemetery Association was formed in 1941, with A.J. McCallum as President and L.T. Wilson, Secretary-Treasurer. Joe B. Walker, Wilson's successor, has served the association for 27 years. The association installed the chain link fence and water supply system. There are about 300 marked graves, and the cemetery is still open to burials. #8659

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8659 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Alexander Methodist Chapel. Organized in 1854 by Robert Alexander, Circuit Rider. First church built of hand-hewn logs in 1856 by early settlers, George Fullerton, Hugh Henry, Jim Walker, John Walker, E.W. Thompson and others. Ten acres of church land donated by Eliz Boatwright and John Singleton was deeded to the following trustees: James Walker, William Lawrence, John B. Wallace, William Glass and Harvey Mitchell. Second church was built in 1908 - W.D. Gardner, Pastor. Third church was built in 1939 - Willard Smith, Pastor. #8660

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8660 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Allen Academy. This school originated as Madison Academy, founded in 1886 in Madisonville by John Hodges Allen (1854-1920), an educator from Mississippi. When his brother Rivers O. Allen (1865-1925) joined him in 1896, the institution became Allen Academy, a private boarding school for boys. During the summer of 1899, the Allens moved the school to Bryan. In the early years of the 20th Century, enrollment steadily increased. The campus was enlarged and new buildings erected to accommodate the students. During World War I, military training was introduced. In 1925 John Allen's son Nat Burtis Allen (1892-1946) became director of the school. During his tenure, the academy continued to grow and gained national recognition. When he died in 1946, the campus contained over 300 acres, including a farm and dairy. His son Nat Burtis Allen, Jr. (1919-1973) guided the institution until 1973 and led in establishing broader curriculum. Allen Academy is the oldest accredited, non-sectarian preparatory school for boys operating in Texas. Its graduates include leaders in government and business. Today the institution is coeducational and offers a broad range of scholastic programs for boarding and day students. (1997) #8661

3201 FM 158, Bryan, TX, United States
#8661 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Astin-Porter Home. Built for Onah (Ward) Astin (d. 1944), the wife of cotton planter James H. Astin (d. 1897), this house was designed by the Waco firm of Howard Messer and S. Wemyss Smith. Construction began in 1901 and was completed two years later. The exterior of the Classical Revival residence features a two-story gallery with Corinthian columns. Holland Porter, a planter, purchased the home in 1946, and additions were made to the structure during his ownership. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1980 #8663

600 E. 29th St., Bryan, TX, United States
#8663 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Black Education in Bryan. On March 30, 1885, the City of Bryan purchased seven lots in this area as a site for a public school to provide separate but equal and impartial instruction for black children of the community, as prescribed by the Texas State Constitution of 1876. The "Bryan Public School for Colored" was the first educational institution established for blacks in Brazos County. When school opened in the fall of 1885, its principal was A.H. Colwell, who later became a prominent leader of black Republicans, and was named as a presidential elector from Texas in 1896. The original faculty included Mrs. Anne Alberson, Misses Mamie Burrows and Beatrice Calhoun, Mrs. Ada Scott Hall, and Mrs. Lenora Green, a classmate of Dr. William E.B. Dubois. The first school building of this site was a two-story frame structure, furnished with planks supported by kegs for seating. After the school burned in 1914, a brick edifice was constructed. In 1930, when the Kemp Junior-Senior High School was built across town, this facility became Washington Elementary School. After its destruction by fire in Sept. 1971, Washington Elementary was not rebuilt and the black students were integrated into the Bryan Public School System. Washington Park occupies most of the original site. #8664

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8664 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Town of Boonville. Site of the town of Boonville Established in 1841 as the county seat of Navasota County by John Millican, John H. Jones, J. ?Ferguson, E. Seale, and Mordecai Boon whose name it bears. The name of the county was changed to Brazos in 1842. Boonville flourished until 1866 when Bryan was established on the railroad #8665

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8665 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Brazos County. 1936 text: Created from Robertson and Washington Counties in 1841. First called Navasota, changed 1842 to Brazos after two rivers on county's boundaries. Organized in 1843, with Boonville as county seat; Bryan county seat since 1866. Area originally included in Stephen F. Austin's Second Colony, 1828. Became a part of the Washington municipality, 1837, under the Mexican government. First railroad reached Millican in 1860. A. & M. University opened, 1876. Economy based on agricultural, industrial and educational activities. Replacement text, 2000: Brazos County, part of Stephen F. Austin's colony, was created from Washington County in 1841. It was first named Navasota County, with Boonville as the county seat. In 1842 the name was changed to Brazos County. Through the Civil War, Millican, located at the end of the railroad from Houston, was a major town. When the railroad was continued through the county, Bryan became the county seat in 1866. The Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (Texas A&M) opened in 1876 and College Station grew around it, incorporating in 1938. #8666

300 E. 26th St., Bryan, TX, United States
#8666 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Brazos County Confederate Commissioners Court. Furnished horses, equipment and clothing for county men in the Civil War. Levied war taxes on property, exempting lands or estates of Confederate soldiers. After surveying to determine needs of the families of Brazos soldiers, appropriated funds to care for them. Gave credits for contributions made by citizens to soldiers' dependents. Issued county warrants for 25 (cents), 50 (cents), $1, $2, $3 and $5 that passed as legal tender. Obtained for resale to the citizens scarce powder, lead, gun caps, medicines, shoes, cotton cards cloth, shoe makers' tools. #8667

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8667 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Bryan, William Joel. Native of Missouri. Member of prominent family who were Texas statesmen, planters, developers. Grandson of Moses Austin, who obtained from Mexico charter for American Colony in Texas, but died before making settlement. Nephew of Stephen F. Austin, "Father of Texas", who actually established the colony. Came to Texas with his mother, Emily Austin Bryan Perry, in 1831. During Texas Revolution, fought in Battle of Bexar, 1835. For 71 years was a planter on land near Peach Point, where the bachelor Stephen F. Austin had a room reserved for him in Perry Home. As eldest nephew, inherited family leadership when Stephen F. Austin died in 1836. Backed his brothers' careers, especially in the case of Guy M. Bryan, U.S. Congressman 1858-1860, and for many years a leader in Texas government. During the Civil War, cared for business interests of his 4 sons in the Confederate Army. At his own expense fed Confederate troops stationed near his plantation to defend the Texas coast. Backed construction of Deep Water Harbor at mouth of the Brazos. During building of Houston & Texas Central Railroad, donated site for Bryan, which in 1866 became county seat of Brazos County. #8669

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8669 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Bryan City Cemetery. Established on June 13, 1868, three years after the townsite of Bryan was dedicated. Land for the graveyard--20 acres then on the northern edge of Bryan--was sold to the city for $100 by landowner J.C. Hubert. The first addition of land was made June 15, 1915; the area is now 48 acres. Many prominent early citizens are buried here. The City Cemetery Advisory Board and the Bryan Cemetery Association (organized November 30, 1920) serve in an advisory capacity in the operation of the cemetery. #8670

1111 N. Texas Ave., Bryan, TX, United States
#8670 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Cavitt House. Attorney William R. Cavitt (1849-1924) purchased a city block here in 1875, the year he married Mary Mitchell. Cavitt became Brazos County Attorney in 1878 and about 1880 he and Mary built a brick Italianate residence here. Cavitt later served as a State Legislator and on the Board of Texas A&M University. The Cavitts modified the house in the 1920s to reflect contemporary Colonial Revival influences. The house remained in the Cavitt family until 1978. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1995 #8673

713 E. 30th St., Bryan, TX, United States
#8673 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Edge House. Completed in 1925 for the family of prominent Bryan merchant Eugene Edge (1879-1954) and his wife Cora Zulch (d. 1939), this two-and-one-half story brick house reflects the Georgian Revival style. Defining features include its symmetrical composition, entry portico with Doric columns, stone quoins, gabled dormers, and fanlight transom. After the deaths of Mr. and Mrs. Edge, the house remained in the Edge family until 1978. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1991 #8676

609 S. Ennis, Bryan, TX, United States
#8676 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Eugene Edge Home. This Queen Anne style residence features a two-story wraparound porch with a decorative balustrade. The front porch, with its Doric columns and triangular pediment over the entryway, exhibits elements of the Colonial Revival style of architecture. The home was constructed in 1901-02 by locally prominent builder Charles Jenkins. It served as the residence of Eugene Edge, an early Bryan businessman, until 1918. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1985 #8677

508 E. 30th St., Bryan, TX, United States
#8677 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

First Baptist Church, Bryan, Texas. "Bryan Station, Brazos County, Nov. 21, 1866...I hope a better day is dawning, for last Sabbath a Baptist church was organized here and 16 members united with it," wrote Mrs. Sara Dodson. One block west of this site stood first house of worship, a two-story frame building that once was a tenpin alley and saloon; the first pews were planks laid on kegs. Rev. W.B. Eaves was the first pastor. The present church sanctuary, erected 1927, is seventh house of worship since its founding and third to be erected on this site since 1883. #8678

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8678 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

First Methodist Church of Bryan. Among the circuit riders who preached to early Methodists in this area were The Rev. Robert Alexander, presiding elder of the district, and The Rev. H.V. Philpott, who conducted services in a hall above a saloon. The Rev. H.G. Horton organized this congregation in 1868 and soon raised $500 to build a church on this site, deeded by the Houston & Texas Central Railroad. A brick church, erected in 1902, burned in 1906 and was rebuilt in 1908. During the 1920s, an adjacent residence was bought and remodeled for classrooms and the fellowship hall. A new sanctuary was completed in 1951. #8679

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8679 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

First National Bank of Bryan. The First National Bank of Bryan traces its history to 1862 when its earliest predecessor, a private lending agency, was established by W.H. Flippen and Milton Parker in Millican. In 1867, after the Houston and Texas Central Railroad extended its line north to the new city of Bryan, Flippen bought out Parker's interest, moved to the new community, and merged his lending operation with that of Guy M. Bryan, Jr., son of the town's founder William Joel Bryan. Guy Bryan, along with partners Frank Clarke and J. W. Howell, reorganized this financial enterprise as a private bank in 1873. J. W. Fowlkes joined Clarke, Bryan, and Howell in 1886, and the institution was renamed the First National Bank of Bryan after being granted the eleventh National Bank Charter issued in Texas. The bank was housed in the Fowlkes and Ticby Building in downtown Bryan until 1919, when it moved to new facilities at 108 Main Street. Throughout its history, the First National Bank has supported community development, survived the Great Depression through careful business management and supported many activities during World War II, including an air base in Bryan. The bank moved its main facility to 2807 Texas Avenue in 1976. (1996) #8680

2807 Texas Ave., Bryan, TX, United States
#8680 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

First Presbyterian Church. Organized Nov. 21, 1867, in the Presbytery of Brazos by The Rev. J.H. Hutchinson, this apparently was the second denominational group in Bryan. In 1871, members themselves built their first sanctuary at Washington and 29th Streets. This effort was praised by Synod as "the way to build a church". A new brick structure was erected at the old site in 1906. At present site, first services were held in educational wing, June 1958. Present sanctuary was completed in 1966. In its first century, congregation was served by seventeen ministers. #8681

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8681 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Albert Gallatin. #8683

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8683 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Robert Henry. One of victors in Battle of San Jacinto. Born in Ireland; came to America, 1820, and here to Robertson's Colony, 1832. A staunch Presbyterian, kept true to faith at risk of life. In 1836 War for Texas Independence, he served in 2nd Regt., Infantry, Texas Volunteers. Prominent in public life, he held Justice of Peace Court beneath shade trees. He married Elizabeth Downing, Londonderry, Ire.; had 13 children. Their heirs include noted Texans. #8684

?, Bryan, TX, United States
#8684 of the Texas Historical Marker series
Nophotosqr

Charlie Eric Jenkins. English native Charlie E. Jenkins came to America in 1873 and to Bryan in 1878. One of Bryan's most prolific and talented builders of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, Jenkins' legacy of distinctive structures has been recognized by national and state organizations for their historic and architectural significance. Jenkins is known for his masterful use of natural lighting and for employing many different styles. In addition to his architectural contributions, Jenkins also was active in the city's civic affairs, having served as both Fire Chief and City Building Inspector. #8685

1111 N. Texas Ave., Bryan, TX, United States
#8685 of the Texas Historical Marker series

Data about Bryan, TX as JSON