United States / Crockett, TX

all or unphotographed
Five Courthouses of Houston County. On June 12, 1837, President Sam Houston authorized the formation of Houston County, the first newly created county in the Republic of Texas. Andrew W. Gossett (1812-1890) donated land, which included this square, for the townsite. He and his father, Elijah, both veterans of the Battle of San Jacinto, named the county for Sam Houston, and the county seat for David Crockett, a former Tennessee friend. The first county courthouse, a log structure which served as a fortress during Indian attacks, was in use at this location by 1838. A brick building, which replaced the first courthouse in 1851, was destroyed by a fire of mysterious origin in 1865. County business was conducted in the L.E. Downes building on the southwest corner of the square until a two-story frame structure was finished in 1869. A jail addition burned in 1871 while it was under construction. The third courthouse and jail burned in 1882. The fourth courthouse, completed at this site in 1883, was razed in 1938. While this three-story structure was under construction, county business was conducted in the Crockett Hotel. In 1975 the third-floor jail was moved to a separate building and the fifth Houston County courthouse was remodeled. (1979) #11132

Courthouse Square, Crockett, TX, United States

Subjects
Albert Holley House. In 1857 Albert Holley (b. 1828), his mother and two brothers, migrated to Houston County from Alabama. While the others journeyed to Texas by boat, he brought the family's supplies overland by wagon with 137 slaves. By 1860 he and his wife Julia (Russell) (1840-97) had begun homesteading this land. After serving in the Civil War, where he was a prisoner of war, Albert continued to farm here. In 1867 he constructed a new home for his family at this site. He died in 1907, but his land remained in the ownership of Holley family members until 1976. #11213

?, Crockett, TX, United States

First Baptist Church of Crockett. A Baptist church, led by pioneer James T. Heplin, was meeting in Crockett as early as 1846. A second Baptist congregation was formally organized in 1850. Named Mt. Zion Baptist Church of Crockett, the congregation built a sanctuary on El Camino Real, now known as East Houston Avenue. A frame structure, completed about 1874 and known as Crockett Baptist Church at North 7th Street and East Houston, served the congregation until 1910. In that year the church, renamed First Baptist Church of Crockett, began construction of a new brick sanctuary. While it was under construction, worship services were held in the county courthouse. The new church building was completed by 1912. On December 26, 1946, the sanctuary was destroyed by fire. Rather than rebuild on the same site, the congregation elected to relocate. Services were held in the high school until 1949, when a new church building was completed at East Goliad Street and South 8th Street. An education building, fellowship hall, and other facilities were later added to the church property. First Baptist Church has served its community for over a century and has been an important part of Crockett history. #7924

801 East Goliad, Crockett, TX, United States

Frank Mulder Gossett. (Aug. 25, 1892 -- Sept. 22, 1974) Houston County native Frank M. Gossett was the grandson of Andrew E. Gossett, Sr., donor of the Crockett townsite. A prominent local historian, Frank Gossett was a founder in 1922 of the Sons of the Republic of Texas, a group that later honored him as a Knight of San Jacinto. He was also a founder and and officer of the San Jacinto Memorial Association, which raised funds for the monument and museum at the San Jacinto battlefield. #11189

East Pease Street, Crockett, TX, United States

Subjects
Armistead Albert Aldrich. Author --" History of Houston County, Texas" (April 10, 1858 -- Aug. 22, 1945) Born in Crockett, son of Oliver Cromwell and Eliza (Masters) Aldrich. Educated at University of Virginia, he was admitted to the bar in 1883. Elected City Alderman, 1890; County Judge, 1892; State Representative, 1900. Served as Presidential Elector, 1936. He was on the Board of Trustees of Austin College for 30 years. Married Miss Willie Arledge; They brought up six children. He was active in historical preservation until his death. #7014

East Pease Street, Crockett, TX, United States

James Elbert Downes. (October 31, 1845 -- January 25, 1917) A native of Houston County, James Elbert Downes was the son of area pioneers. He served in the Civil War and was later active in the local Confederate veterans association. He was married to Elizabeth Brown in 1871 and they were the parents of three sons. A prominent local business and civic leader, Downes devoted much of his time to the Methodist Church. The home he built for his family on 7th Street in a noted landmark. #10985

E. Pease Street, Crockett, TX, United States

William Elbert "Buck" Mayes. (July 14, 1837 -- August 27, 1915) Alabama native William Elbert "Buck" Mayes, son of The Rev. Isaac C. Mayes and Lucinda Fuller, came to Texas in 1856. He married Sarah (Dickerson) Clark in 1858. After serving in the Civil War Mayes returned to Houston County and became a successful lumber and mercantile businessman. Mayes' various commercial enterprises, which included one of the area's earliest banking operations, played a vital role in Houston County's post-Civil War development. #7920

East Pease Ave., Crockett, TX, United States

Congressman Nat Patton. (Feb. 26, 1881 -- July 27, 1957) Native of Houston County, Nat Patton was known for his custom of addressing both friends and strangers as "cousin". After teaching school for a number of years, he opened a law office in Crockett. He served as county judge, state representative, and state senator before winning election to the U.S. Congress from the 7th district. His colorful congressional career spanned a decade, 1935-1945. A longtime mason, Patton married Mattie Taylor and had four children. #11226

US Hwy 287 & SH 19, Crockett, TX, United States

John Gordon Beasley. (July 3, 1888 -- April 5, 1959) A leading figure in 20th-century Crockett history, John Gordon "Big Jack" Beasley, Sr., was involved in a number of local businesses, including the Davy Crockett Federal Savings and Loan, which he helped organize in 1928. Beasley served as mayor of Crockett (1936-1940) during the city's centennial celebration. Accomplishments of his administration included paved and lighted streets for the city and Davy Crockett Memorial Building and Park. #11231

US Hwy 287 & SH 19, Crockett, TX, United States

Greater St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church. A small group from Bethel Missionary Baptist Church in Crockett withdrew in 1884 to create their own congregation. The St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church was organized under the leadership of the Reverend Raefield Cotton and six deacons. The group secured land two and a half miles south of the courthouse square and erected a small frame building, naming it St. Paul Baptist Church in 1898. As the congregation increased, members came from surrounding areas. In 1906 the church moved into a new facility two blocks from the courthouse. They erected a larger structure in the early 1920s. Because the church served a large area surrounding Crockett, the name was changed to Greater St. Paul Baptist Church in 1924. The congregation remains active with programs of worship and service. (1999) #12082

307 S. 2nd St., Crockett, TX, United States

Andrew Edwards Gossett. (1812-1890) Noted public official and soldier in Republic of Texas. Moved here from Tennessee in 1833 with wife Rhoda (Mulder); received large land grant from Mexico. Helped defend frontier in restless post-revolutionary period by serving in Texas Army. In 1836 he donated land for a townsite, naming it for his long-time family friend Day Crockett -- soon to be a martyr at the Battle of the Alamo. Gossett later served as peace officer and county judge. By first wife he had nine children. By second wife, Mary Margaret (Murchison), he had two. #11196

Beasley Memorial Drive, Crockett, TX, United States

Subjects
All Saints Episcopal Church. Bishop G.W. Freeman began work of this faith in Crockett, April 19, 1850. All Saints was founded Oct. 1, 1864, by Bishop Alexander Gregg. Special ministry brought many slaves into the parish. A church was built on lot given by A.T. Monroe, nephew of fifth U.S. President, but by 1867, the church building had been lost (possibly in a fire) and local economy was in ruins as result of Civil War. With layreaders and part-time or visiting priests, worship was held in homes for many years. Reactivated in 1947, All Saints built a second church in 1958. #7603

?, Crockett, TX, United States

A. T. Monroe House. House built by A. T. Monroe, nephew of U.S. president who issued the Monroe Doctrine. Structure is hand-hewn Louisiana heart oak over brick inner walls. Noted as center of social activities. Since 1911 in the family of prominent attorney George W. Crook. #11210

707 East Houston, Crockett, TX, United States

Collin Aldrich, San Jacinto Veteran, First Chief Justice of Houston County, 1837-1841 born May 2 1801 died in 1842

Highway 21, Crockett, TX, United States

Subjects
Site of the Crockett Hotel. James H. Collard, a surveyor, opened a general store on this site in 1837. Four years later he sold the business to Thomas Collins (1800-1869). Members of the Collins family ran the store until 1890 when William Berry (b.1856) constructed the Pickwick Hotel. Two brothers, F.A. and J.H. Smith, bought the building in 1921. It was reopened as the Davy Crockett Hotel in 1927. During construction of a new courthouse (1938-39), it housed county offices. The Crockett Hotel Co. purchased the business in 1939. Ray and Alta Cornelius served as managers until a fire destroyed it in 1972. (1980) #11089

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Subjects
New Energy Cemetery. Established with the burial of a traveler on the land of Mary (Polly) Rice, this cemetery dates to the Civil War era. The first grave that bears an inscribed tombstone, that of Walter Ashmore, is dated 1870. Over the years members of the Duren and Hill families have deeded acreage for the burial ground. It has served residents of New Energy and surrounding settlements and has been associated with a school and a union church. Descendants of many of the area's pioneers continue to use the cemetery. #7050

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Grounds Cemetery. George (1803-1860) and Catherine (Rice) Grounds (1810-1880) settled in this area about 1829. Their arrival coincided with that of Catherine's brother, Joseph R. Rice, Sr., who settled his family about 5 miles southwest of this site in 1828. This cemetery was established in 1860 with the burial of George Grounds. By 1883 the graveyard had been legally set aside. It contains mostly Grounds family members and is representative of historic family cemeteries in East Texas. George Grounds' original red sandstone grave marker was replaced with a granite headstone in 1993. #7059

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Nunn, Colonel D.A.. #15643

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Subjects
Miller-Spinks-Mayes Property. This corner of the town square was developed as a law office after state legislator and Houston County judge S.A. Miller (1805-1893) purchased it in 1840. In 1891, Rudd Crawford Spinks (1856-1938) bought the site and built a two-story brick building for his jewelry store with living quarters on the second floor. W.E. "Buck" Mayes, a Crockett merchant, banker and landowner, bought the building, now substantially altered from its original appearance, in 1895. The property remains an important site in Crockett's commercial history. #11227

West Houston & North 4th Streets, Crockett, TX, United States

Site of Wheeler Springs School. Site of Wheeler Springs School The Wheeler Springs community was shaped in part by its school, which began on land donated in 1905 by French Taylor. The Houston County school board designated it Common School District No. 76 in 1906. Millie Denby and Lula (Denby) Dailey were the first teachers. A house moved to the site in 1930 served as a canning kitchen and cafeteria, and a 1932 log cabin provided space for meetings and quilting groups. In 1948, students began attending an area high school; Mose Dailey was their first bus driver. The county razed the 1925 schoolhouse in 1959, following consolidation, but the other buildings served the community for many years. (2002) #12804

13.6 mi. NNW of courthouse in Crockett, via US 287/SH 219, FM 229, and CR 2080, Crockett, TX, United States

Kings Highway. #15391

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Cedar Point Church and Cemetery. Formal organization of the Cedar Point Church occurred in July 1885, shortly after a church building was constructed at this site. Led by Presbyterian circuit preachers, the congregation placed emphasis on Christian education, music, and revivals until a declining membership led to dissolution about 1946. Within a few years of its organization, the Cedar Point Church began the adjacent cemetery in which the first marked grave, that of Sam Houston Rice, dates to 1891. A cemetery association, formed after the church disbanded, has maintained the grounds over the years. #11083

12 miles northeast fo Crockett on SH 21, then 5 miles south on FM 1733, then on dirt road .75 mile, Crockett, TX, United States

Randolph Community. Settled 1838, by Cyrus Halbert Randolph (1817-1889) on the San Felipe de Austin-Nacogdoches mail route. Randolph was a member of Snively expedition; county Justice of the Peace, Coroner, Chief Justice, and Sheriff; state legislator and Treasurer. School was opened about 1850 and post office established June 30, 1858. Had 2 stores, blacksmith shop, saloon and barber shop in 1860, when it tried to wrest the county seat from Crockett, after which Randolph slowly began to decline in population. Demise of the settlement was marked by the closing of the post office September 29, 1881. #7036

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Crockett. Founded 1837. Named for David Crockett, who had visited here on way to the Alamo, 1836. Old fortified log courthouse was often the refuge for settlers during Indian wars. During Civil War had camp of instruction. Telegraph and stagecoach station for South. Forestry, farming and livestock center. #7037

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Subjects
Colonel David Alexander Parker. (Oct. 1, 1836 -- Aug. 13, 1911) Mayor of Crockett, 1859. In Civil War (1861-65) led Co. I, 4th Texas Calvary. Member Constitutional Convention of 1875. #7049

East Pease Street, Crockett, TX, United States

Vicory Barker Tunstall. (October 21, 1876 -- February 8, 1953) Born west of Crockett. A noted musician. Houston County District Clerk, 1918-22. A barber by trade. In boyhood, studied violin. At 16, began teaching. At 20, opened Tunstall Music House. Traveled East Texas 50 years with band that included his ten children. Founded World's Championship Fiddler's Festival, 1937. At 1951 state fair was proclaimed the Champion Fiddler of Texas. Married (1st), Emma Virginia English; (2nd) Mrs. Lillie Shanks. #7601

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Augustus "Gus" LeGory. (Oct. 10, 1840 -- Dec. 4, 1930) In 1955 Augustus "Gus" LeGory came to Texas from Mississippi. After serving in the Civil War, he returned to the area and worked with a Trinity River steamboat company. He later developed his own overland and river freight hauling enterprise and in 1870 opened a Crockett saloon. A community promoter, LeGory engaged in banking, coal production, and agriculture. He married Eliza Wortham in 1875 and they had six children. #7923

East Pease Ave., Crockett, TX, United States

Stagecoach Inn. Built as a home by Joseph D. Rice, Sr., who came to Texas in 1828. In 1838 it was designated as a stopping place for the stage coach from Nacogdoches to Crockett. #8809

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Spence-Chamberlain House. This house was built by teacher and lawyer John Spence and his wife Adele, also a teacher, about 1870. John died in 1879, and in 1891 Adele sold the house to druggist B. Frank Chamberlain and his wife Una. Sometime prior to 1920 the Chamberlains attached a kitchen to the house and added bay windows. The house exhibits a foursquare configuration with symmetrical windows and center dormer on a pyramidal roof. It remained in the Chamberlain family until 1978. #8810

717 E. Houston Ave., Crockett, TX, United States

Hall's Bluff. Maryland native Joshua James Hall migrated to Texas and purchased a land grant in 1839 on the east side of the Trinity River. Hall and his son, James Madison Hall, established a port and ferry on the Trinity River as a shipping point for Houston County settlers. The Community of Hall's Bluff developed around the ferry in the mid-19th century, and included a general store, post office, churches and a school. Unreliable shipping due to weather-related problems and the arrival of the railroad in the 1870s, caused the port to decline and eventually most residents moved away. #9465

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Nelson Box. -- #11205

Beeson-Box Cemetery; 3 miles south of Crockett on SH 19, Crockett, TX, United States

Reverend Thomas Box. -- #11206

Beeson-Box Cemetery; 3 miles south of Crockett on SH 19, Crockett, TX, United States

John A. Box. -- #11204

Beeson-Box Cemetery; 3 miles south of Crockett on SH 19, Crockett, TX, United States

W.V. McConnell Building. Crockett native William Van McConnell (1855-1919) built this victorian commercial structure soon after he purchased the site in 1891 from Maj. J.C. Wooters, a former mayor of the city. Known for his wit and his Irish stories, McConnell opened a mercantile store here which developed into a business that lasted until 1973. A landmark on the square for many years, the McConnell Building now serves as a reminder of Crockett's early growth. #11238

113 4th Street, Crockett, TX, United States

Glover School. Established in 1881, the Glover School served residents of the rural Glover Community, Under the direction of teacher James Breeze, a one-room schoolhouse was built on A.E. Sloan's land, now the site of the Old Glover Cemetery. A consolidated school district was formed in 1836 and the third schoolhouse was built at this site soon after. Destroyed by fire in 1938, it was rebuilt the next year. The school merged with the Kennard District in 1967, but community identity and pride provided by the early school are reflected in biennial reunions of ex-students and teachers. #10962

SH 21 about 17.7 miles northeast of Crockett, Crockett, TX, United States

W. E. Mayes Property. Alabama native William Elbert "Buck" Mayes (1836-1915) came to this area in 1856. After serving in the Civil War, he returned home to Houston County and became a successful businessman with interests in banking, real estate, construction and retail sales. By April 1893, he owned the three commercial structures at this site (509-513 E. Goliad). The buildings became an important part of Crockett's business community, providing space for such operations as a newpaper and theater. The site now serves as a reminder of Mayes' many contributions to the growth of the city. #10964

509-513 E. Goliad, Crockett, TX, United States

Wheeler Springs Community. Settlement in this area began in 1835, when Joshua J. Hall (1790-1871) established a community south of here along the Trinity River. After the Civil War, Hall family slaves and other freed African Americans settled here. In 1885 the community was named for springs located on land donated by French Taylor (1842-1937) for church purposes. A Baptist sanctuary and schoolhouse (1905) were built near the springs. In the 1920s a new school building was erected and a cannery began operations. The school closed in 1959 but the church and various civic organizations remain active. #10966

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Whitehead Cemetery. The Henry Whitehead family came to Texas from Mississippi during the 1850s and settled in Houston County about 1862. A confederate veteran, Henry Whitehead (1821-1877) established this family cemetery on his land with the burial of first wife, Mary Ann "Polly" (Priest), in 1870. Only one of their seven children, Aaron, is buried here. The descendants of Aaron (1854-1927) and Elizabeth (1859-1928) Whitehead have continued to use and maintain the family burial ground. The site covers more than two acres and contains over sixty graves. #10967

?, Crockett, TX, United States

George G. Alford. (June 17, 1793 -- April 1, 1847) New York native George G. Alford, an officer in the War of 1812, came to Texas from Missouri in 1836. During the Texas Revolution he served as Gen. Sam Houston's quartermaster general. Captured by Mexican forces after the was while on a supply trip for the Republic of Texas, he was released by Mexican forces through intervention by the U.S. President, Andrew Jackson. Alford later owned a Houston County plantation and served as justice of the peace and county judge. #10969

East Pease Street, Crockett, TX, United States

Harry Frederick Moore. (December 15, 1854 -- April 20, 1926) Harry F. Moore began his banking career in Ohio, where he married Anna Laura May in 1885. They moved to Galveston in 1890, then to Crockett in 1891. He assisted in organizing the First National Bank, and in 1904 became president. Serving for 22 years, he set an example for his successors, including two of his sons. He organized banks in nearby towns and was a prominent member of the community, an active church member, and a mason. #11015

?, Crockett, TX, United States

A. E. Gossett Home. House of typical southern plan, with separate kitchen in back yard, Built 1835 by A. E. Gossett, owner of large land grant from Mexico. An early 1836 visitor was former Tennessee neighbor, Col. David Crockett, on his way to the Alamo, and camping with his company for a night at the spring nearby.

?, Crockett, TX, United States

Subjects
Givens Homesite. Solomon George Givens and his wife Lula (Burleson), both born in Houston County in 1871, were the children of former slaves. They were married in Crockett in 1891, and in 1892 they bought 34 acres of land here. Their farm proved a success and in 1893 they built a large 8-room house at this site. The Givenses were noted for their charity and as leaders in the development of a nearby school and Baptist church; Baptism services took place in a tank on their land. For many years their home was the center of an African-American farming community known as "Givens Hill." #10992

?, Crockett, TX, United States

William Kyle McLean. (October 14, 1902 -- September 6, 1971) Descended from the first permanent settlers in this area, William Kyle McLean made significant contributions to the agricultural history of Houston County and East Texas. The recipient of numerous soil conservation awards, McLean earned national recognition for the introduction of coastal bermuda grass to the area, the planting of crimson and white Dutch clovers in his pastures, and the use of bees for clover crop pollination. #11016

?, Crockett, TX, United States

John Edward and Lucy Stepp Nite. John Edward Nite (1805-1849), born in North Carolina, married Lucy Stepp (1807-1865), a native of Georgia, in 1826. Although robbed of $1800 in gold en route to Texas from Tennessee in 1835, they were able to secure 1,506 acres of land along the Trinity River in Houston County by 1838. John served as a Captain of a home guard ranger unit and later as the area's official mail carrier. Together they helped establish a school for their eight children and those of their neighbors. #11017

East Pease Street, Crockett, TX, United States

Downes-Aldrich House. An outstanding example of Eastlake-Victorian architecture, started about 1891, completed in 1893, by J.E. Downes, prominent local businessman. Much of the material in the structure was imported from other states. Downes lived in the house until 1910, and sold it the next year to Armistead Albert Aldrich (1858-1945), distinguished civic leader and historian, who resided here until his death. The Aldrich family still occupies the house. #11095

206 N. 7th, Crockett, TX, United States

The Rev. John C. Woolam. (January 15, 1813 -- January 18, 1894) South Carolina native John C. Woolam lived in Tennessee and served in the Florida Indian Wars before coming to Texas in 1838. After being licensed to preach by the Methodist Church in 1840, he served 34 churches in east and southeast Texas during the next 50 years. He was a Confederate chaplain during the Civil War, and as chaplain of the Texas Veterans Association he delivered the dedicatory prayer at the opening of the state capitol building in 1888. #11063

?, Crockett, TX, United States

William Van McConnell. (April 18, 1855 -- March 17, 1919) A native of Crockett, William V. McConnell was the son of Irish-born blacksmith John McConnell. After helping his father with that trade, McConnell opened a mercantile store on the square and developed there a family business that lasted nearly a century. McConnell was a charter member of the First Christian Church. After the death of his first wife, Jennie McLean (1868-1888), McConnell married her sister Daisy (1875-1935). #11239

East Pease Street, Crockett, TX, United States

Davy Crockett Memorial Park. Davy Crockett Memorial Park dedicated June 12, 1937 City of Crockett, Texas named for Davis Crockett and incorporated by the Republic of Texas Dec. 29, 1837 ------- Houston County named for General Sam Houston created by act of the Republic of Texas June 12, 1837 ------- City officials Mayor J.B. Beasley; Councilmen R.L. Shivers, H.O. McCarty, C.L.. Edminsten, W.E. Keland, B.O. Perdue #11090

Beasley Memorial Drive, Crockett, TX, United States

Subjects
George W. Crook Home. -- #11091

707 E. Houston, Crockett, TX, United States

Early Bank Building. A typical late 19th Century Texas commercial building, with cast iron front and pressed tin ornamentation. Erected for bank development in mercantile store of W.E. Mayes (1837-1915). To aid his customers, Mayes in 1880s took care of cash and credit; in 1891 sold this business to First National Bank of Crockett, which he and H.F. Moore were organizing. This structure, built 1893-94, was sold 1954 to Mary Aldrich, abstractor. #11096

505 E. Goliad, Crockett, TX, United States