United States / Decatur, TX

all or unphotographed
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New Salem Freewill Baptist Church. #17119

4455 South FM 51, Decatur, TX, United States

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Old Campsite of Jesse and Frank James. Famous western frontier outlaws, who had many Texas hideouts along a line from the Rio Grande to the Red River. The camps - extending into Missouri, their home state - were used for hiding stolen horses until posses could be thrown off the trail. The campsites were sometimes known to scattered settlers, who feared or befriended the bandits. Also, friendly with the James brothers (and also operating sometimes in Texas) were fellow Missouri outlaws, Cole Younger and "Bandit Queen" Belle Starr. This was an era of widespread lawlessness in Texas. Billy the Kid roamed into West Texas. The Daltons, John Wesley Hardin, Cullen Baker, Bill Longley, Sam Bass and many others found it easy to kill and rob and then hid in wild areas where they were beyond the reach of local officers, and food was plentiful. After reconstruction ended in 1874, Texas Rangers were reorganized, to restore respect for the law. Given special powers, in 1889-90 they arrested 579 wanted men (including 76 alleged murders). Jesse James and some other notorious badmen by then were dead. Frank, reformed, worked as a salesman in Dallas, Paris, and other Texas towns. #3700

US 380, E of Decatur, Decatur, TX, United States

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Cattle Trail Crossing Near this site ran one of the many “feeder” branches of the famous Chisholm Trail, best-known of all the cattle trails that once linked the vast grasslands of Texas with the meat-hungry markets of the North. The original trial, which stretched from the North Canadian to the Arkansas River, was blazed in 1865 by Jesse Chisholm, a half-Scottish and half-Cherokee trader. The 220-mile route, soon taken up by drovers, was extended north and south. Branches all the way from the Rio Grande gradually snaked up to join the main trail at the Red River. Although unpredictable Texas weather and hostile Indians sometimes prevented the drovers from keeping to the main route, certain points were fixed. One of the these was the Trinity River ford at Fort Worth, just south of here, where cattle might have to wait for weeks to cross if the river had recently flooded. In 1895, the fenced range, railroad, and quarantines against the fever tick had reduced to a trickle the flood of cattle leaving Texas on the hoof; but by this time, the trail had helped restore the economy of Texas (wrecked by the Civil War) and it had left a legacy in folksong and legend of cowboy days on the untamed Texas frontier.

U.S. Route 380 at Decatur/Denton County line, Decatur, TX, United States

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El Castile (Old Waggoner Home). #4

1000 E. Main St., Decatur, TX, United States

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Jesse and Frank James famous western frontier outlaws, who had many Texas hideouts along a line from the Rio Grande to the Red River. The camps--extending into Missouri, their home state--were used for hiding stolen horses until posses could be thrown off the trail. The campsites were sometimes known to be scattered settlers, who feared or befriended the bandits. Also friendly with the James Brothers (and also operating sometimes in Texas) were fellow Missouri outlaws, Cole Younger and “Bandit Queen” Belle Starr. This was an era of widespread lawlessness in Texas. Billy the Kid roamed into West Texas. The Daltons, John Wesley Hardin, Cullen Baker, Bill Longley, Sam Bass, and many others found it easy to kill and rob and then hide in wild areas where they were beyond the reach of local officers, and food was plentiful. After Reconstruction ended in 1874, Texas Rangers were reorganized to restore respect for the law. Given special powers, in 1889-90 they arrested 579 wanted men (including 76 alleged murderers). Jesse James and some other notorious badmen by then were dead. Frank, reformed, worked as a salesman in Dallas, Paris, and other Texas towns.

U.S. Route 380 & Decatur County Road 2311, Decatur, TX, United States

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Wise County Courthouse. Texas Historical Building Medallion #5874

?, Decatur, TX, United States

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Battle of the Knobs. On November 10, 1837, a company of eighteen Republic of Texas soldiers led by Lt. A. B. Benthuysen engaged in a battle with approximately 150 Indians near this site. Ten Texas soldiers were killed in the battle, and the Indian casualties were estimated at fifty. The Texans killed were Alexander Bostwick, Jesse Blair, James Christian, Joseph Cooper, J. Josslin, A. H. Miles, William Nicholson, Wesley Nicholson, William Sanders, and Lewis F. Sheuster. The geologic feature known as the Knobs serves as a memorial to the soldiers who were left on the battlefield. #333

Old Decatur Rd., N of Decatur, Decatur, TX, United States

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Chisholm Trail. Application for historical marker enclosed. #835

Courthouse Square, Decatur, TX, United States

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Decatur Baptist College, world's first institution to be planned (in 1898) as a junior college. This hall was built in 1892, for an earlier school.

Trinity St., Decatur, TX, United States

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Episcopal Mission of the Ascension. Oldest original church building in Decatur. Consecrated by great missionary Bishop, the Rt. Reverend A. C. Garrett. Erected facing Main Street (2 blocks west of square) in 1889. Known as "The Little Church with the Crosses", by 1912 it had deteriorated, but was restored and moved, facing Walnut Street. In 1940 building was sold, used as mattress factory, but rescued same year and moved here, with sanctuary placed symbolically to east, toward Jerusalem. #1492

S. Church and Hale St., Decatur, TX, United States

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Flat Rock Cemetery. Settled in 1850s by Moses Ball and other pioneers. Tradition says first burial here was an Indian; the second, a small girl who died while her family was migrating through the area. Oldest tombstones are dated 1878. There are many unmarked graves. Community, named for some flat stones that formed a landmark, had a Cumberland Presbyterian Church as early as 1883. Burial ground near church was deeded from his land grant on August 28, 1890, by ex-Texas Ranger George W. Stevens (1831-93) for cemetery. After 1914, population dwindled and the church was closed. #1905

Old Decatur Highway, Decatur, TX, United States

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Gose Trees. Remnant of bois d'arc hedge which encircled the log cabin of Stephen M. Gose (1824-77), early justice of the peace, blacksmith, and leader of Methodist church, who came to Texas from Missouri in 1859. The spiny trees, planted 1861, served as a barrier against prowling Indians.

402 W. Walnut, Decatur, TX, United States

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S. W. Tilghman House. Born in Gibson County, Tennessee, S. W. Tilghman (1846-1913) came in 1870 by wagon train to Wise County. In 1872 he married a Decatur native, Eliza Bland Miller (1856-1931), and became father of a daughter and three sons. A master builder, he erected this house in 1882 for his own family. Many of the city's finer houses of the late 19th and early 20th centuries were built by Tilghman and his son Robert. This Victorian residence has remained in ownership by descendants of the builder. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1974. #4404

309 E Shoemaker, Decatur, TX, United States

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Sam Woody's Cabin. Tennessee pioneer Sam Woody (1826-1920) migrated to Texas in the 1840s. He brought his family to Wise County in 1854. This cabin, located near Deep Creek, was the first dwelling in the area. After Woody cut the logs, friends and relatives helped him erect the cabin in one day. Indians came here to trade buffalo robes and moccasins for corn. The house was frequently crowded with guests, for frontier travelers were never turned away. Woody guarded pioneer settlements as part of a Ranger unit and served in the Confederate army during the Civil War (1861-1865). Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1970. #4509

CR 4227, South of Decatur, Decatur, TX, United States

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Dr. William Renshaw Born in Illinois, William Renshaw studied medicine and set up practice in Sparta, Tennessee. His wife Sarah received from the Mexican government a grant of land in Texas, where her father Samuel Worthington lost his life in a colonization attempt in 1828. Dr. Renshaw traveled to Texas in 1853 to locate this headright, which encompassed many acres of Wise County north of this marker site. Dr. Renshaw returned to Sparta and served two terms in the Tennessee legislature before moving his family to Texas in 1859. The first doctor to settle permanently in Wise County, Dr. Renshaw was often away from home for long periods, with a practice extending from Denton to Jacksboro. The Renshaws organized one of the county’s earliest schools, taught by J. D. White, for their own and neighbor children. After the Civil War, the family moved to Decatur, where Dr. Renshaw and his son Lute opened a drugstore. They were devout Baptists and supported Decatur Baptist College. Dr. Renshaw died in 1887 and was buried at Oak Lawn Cemetery in Decatur. As his 10 children married, each received a portion of the Worthington survey. Two family members still own part of the property. A number of descendants became doctors.

U.S. Route 380 & Decatur County Road 2311, Decatur, TX, United States

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Butterfield Overland Stage Line. Through Decatur passed the Butterfield Overland mail line connecting St. Louis and San Francisco with semi-weekly stage and mail service, 1858-1861. The length of the route, 2,795 miles and the superior service maintained made this a pioneer enterprise of the first magnitude. #13755

?, Decatur, TX, United States

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Wise County Messenger. Started by William Forster in 1880, the "Messenger" was published in Paradise (10 miles southwest) and Alvord (11 miles northwest) before a permanent move to Decatur in 1885. Early editions included poems, love stories, and lists of strayed animals and mail at the dead letter office. N. W. and H. A. Halcomb became the owners in 1894. Two of their staff members, Marvin Smith and R. E. "Dick" Collins, bought the paper in 1907. A correspondent during the Spanish-American War, Collins worked on the staff for 40 years. Mergers with Decatur papers include the "Post" (1890), "News" (1935), and "News Review" (1940). (1981) #5875

115 S Trinity St., Decatur, TX, United States

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Wise County Reunion. The Confederate veterans of Wise County are said to have held occasional reunions in the 1860s-1870s. Old settlers invited both the Confederate veterans and Wise County pioneers to an 1881 reunion at Cold Springs. This was on July 12, the anniversary of Captain George Stevens' victory over hostile Indians in 1874. About 5,000 people attended the 1881 reunion. The "Wise County Messenger" reported a successful day -"only the music being a failure". Events included speeches and picnicking. The reunion began to occupy the present site in 1896. By 1900 it extended to three days - honoring old settlers on the first, the veterans on the second, and daughters and sons of Confederates on the third. Sometimes 12,000 would attend, parading from courthouse to camp ground. Programs included candidates' speeches, rodeos, and sham battles. Evenings were devoted to visiting. In 1909, the grounds were leased for 25 years. Later, campsites were leased and improved by participants. The Wise County Old Settlers Association, formed in 1904, sponsored a 1907 Pioneer History by C. D. Cates. Extended to a week, with visiting in daytime and stated events in the evenings, this reunion is now the oldest recurring public event in the county. (1976) #5876

SH 51, Decatur, TX, United States

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St. John Missionary Baptist Church. #17136

904 N. FM 51, Decatur, TX, United States

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Dr. William Renshaw. Born in Illinois, William Renshaw studied medicine and set up practice in Sparta, Tennessee. His wife Sarah received from the Mexican government a grant of land in Texas, where her father Samuel Worthington lost his life in a colonization attempt in 1828. Dr. Renshaw traveled to Texas in 1853 to locate this headright, which encompassed many acres of Wise County north of this marker site. Dr. Renshaw returned to Sparta and served two terms in the Tennessee Legislature before moving his family to Texas in 1859. The first doctor to settle permanently in Wise County, Dr. Renshaw was often away from home for long periods, with a practice extending from Denton to Jacksboro. The Renshaws organized one of the county's earliest schools, taught by J. D. White, for their own and neighbor children. After the Civil War, the family moved to Decatur, where Dr. Renshaw and his son Lute opened a drugstore. They were devout Baptists and supported Decatur Baptist College. Dr. Renshaw died in 1887 and was buried at Oak Lawn Cemetery in Decatur. As his 10 children married, each received a portion of the Worthington survey. Two family members still own part of the property. A number of descendants became doctors. (1977) #1282

US 380, E. of Decatur, Decatur, TX, United States

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Cattle Trail Crossing. Near this site ran one of the many "feeder" branches of the famous Chisholm Trail, best-known of all the cattle trails that once linked the vast grasslands of Texas with the meat-hungry markets of the north. The original trail, which stretched from the North Canadian to the Arkansas River, was blazed in 1865 by Jesse Chisholm, a half-Scottish and half-Cherokee trader. The 220-mile route, soon taken up by drovers, was extended north and south. Branches all the way from the Rio Grande gradually snaked up to join the main trail at the Red River. Although unpredictable Texas weather and hostile Indians sometimes prevented the drovers from keeping to the main route, certain points were fixed. One of these was the Trinity River ford at Fort Worth, just south of here, where cattle might have to wait for weeks to cross if the river had recently flooded. In 1895, the fenced range, railroad, and quarantines against the fever tick had reduced to a trickle the flood of cattle leaving Texas on the hoof; but by this time, the trail had helped restore the economy of Texas (wrecked by the Civil War) and it had left a legacy in folksong and legend of cowboy days on the untamed Texas frontier. #766

US 380, E of Decatur, Decatur, TX, United States

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Oak Lawn Cemetery. Oak Lawn Cemetery was officially established in 1878 when William T. Perry deeded property to R. M. Collins, the mayor of Decatur, for a public burial ground for area residents. At that time however, at least one marked grave, that of Eli Lindley (d. 1867), existed, indicating that a private cemetery had first been established here. Other marked graves dating as early as 1857 are believed to have been relocated to this site after the public cemetery's founding. The city of Decatur managed the cemetery between 1878 and 1928. During that time, local residents C. and Caroline Harmon generously donated land to the city on four occasions to enlarge the cemetery property. In 1928, in response to the recent formation of a cemetery association by E. P. Gibson, W. P. Thurmond, and T. J. Dillehay, the city ceased its management of Oak Lawn. Between 1928 and 1986, the cemetery association maintained the burial ground, which was again enlarged in 1947 and 1960. In 1986, after the dissolution of the association, the City of Decatur resumed responsibility for the graveyard. Now consisting of over forty acres of property, Oak Lawn Cemetery is the final resting place of over 3,700 area residents. #3650

Cemetery Road, Decatur, TX, United States

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Old Stone Prison. First stone house in Decatur. Erected by prison labor about 1859. Main house was residence of sheriff or deputy. Basement was used as jail. Meals were sent down a dumb-waiter located outside the east end of the house. County sold property in 1888 to A. H. Whitehead. Used as city water works until 1938. Kept as private residence until 1967 when purchased by Wise County Historical Society as museum. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1968. #3821

201 E. Pecan, Decatur, TX, United States

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Anneville School. Located on 3-acres donated in 1883 by E. M. Curtner, N. E. Young, P. H. and N. C. Neal for a cemetery, school, and church. First school (a 2-story building) was 30 yards west of cemetery. First church was about 300 yards south of the cemetery. About 1913 a new school was erected on original school site. In 1930 the school district consolidated with Boyd District. The structure was then used as a church until it burned, 1959. Anneville, one-mile south, had 2 stores, a post office, gin, gristmill, and other businesses. It was probably named in honor of Mrs. Annie Davis, early settler. #170

CR 4371, SW of Decatur, Decatur, TX, United States

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Oak Grove United Methodist Church. This congregation was organized in 1878 with fourteen charter members by the Reverend Jim Smith and the Reverend E. C. Fullingim. In 1880 the church became part of the Decatur circuit, and the Reverend R. N. Brown served as its first regular pastor. Oak Grove's original sanctuary was constructed ten miles northeast of Decatur but was moved to this site in 1902. The current church building has been in use since 1948. Oak Grove United Methodist, which traditionally held an August revival camp meeting, stands as one of the oldest rural churches in Wise County. #3645

Greenwood Road, N of Decatur, Decatur, TX, United States

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Site of Wise County Poor Farm & Cemetery. Operated 1885-1962 to support and employ dependent or needy citizens and as place for county convicts to work out fines. First superintendent of the 320-acre farm, R. Suffert, managed all land and activities and his wife cooked, washed, and sewed for both inmates and guards. Of inmates buried in the now-leveled cemetery at bend of Center Creek, only names known are Steve Abbey, Sarah McCain, Jim Wilson, Jim M. Goodner, Bill Hodge; Rankin, Owens (surnames); Della, Edna, Ike, and Mariah. In 1969 county sold buildings and 12 acres of farm at auction. (1971) #4916

Old Reunion Road, S. of Decatur, Decatur, TX, United States

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Preskitt Cemetery. The land around this site was deeded to the trustees of the Lee School Community, one of whom was M. W. Preskitt, in April 1885. In August of the following year, the Lee School trustees deeded half that parcel to County Judge W. W. Brady for a burial ground. The earliest marked grave in the cemetery is that of infant Pearl Hobbs, who was born and died in June 1890. The families buried in the cemetery are among the first farm owners and families living in the community in the 1870s and 1880s. Early school trustee James W. Haynes, a Union Army veteran, is interred here, as are many other military veterans. The cemetery was once associated with a Baptist Church, which was torn down about 1930. At the dawn of the 21st century there were 172 known graves, 27 unmarked, on the property. (2000) Text of supplemental plate: Pioneer families represented in the Preskitt Cemetery include Bramlett, Burns, Haynes, Hilton, Little, Pound, Reeves, Taylor and Ware. #12332

?, Decatur, TX, United States

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Waggoner Cemetery. Georgia native the Reverend Henry Fullingim, his wife Martha, and their 17 children came to northeast Texas in 1849. Henry Fullingim served the area as a circuit-riding Methodist minister. Their son, Archibald, and their son-in-law, John Hale, came to Wise County in 1853 and were among the area's first settlers. Hale became the first Wise County sheriff in 1856. This cemetery is named for John T. and Sarah Waggoner, on whose land it was established. Martha Fullingim's burial in 1868 is the first recorded here. The Waggoner's deeded the property to Wise County in 1885. #5701

CR 2360, N. of Decatur, Decatur, TX, United States

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Wise County, C.S.A.. County named for Henry A. Wise, U.S. Senator from Virginia who supported Texas annexation, later Governor and C.S.A. general. Wise County was part of District One of 33 brigade districts of Texas established to recruit men for Confederate and state service in 1861. The headquarters at Decatur became a military post with an arsenal of supplies set up in the Old Howell and Allen Store. Although the county voted against secession, men joined a military company so early that neither state nor Confederacy had any plans to take over the troops. During the war four more companies were raised. These men served on the Texas frontier and in fighting to the east. With almost all the male population drawn into service, Decatur became a refugee camp where settlers stayed for protection from Indians. In 1862 a "Peace Party Plot" aimed at revolt against the Texas Confederate government was discovered. Fifty persons were brought to trial in the arsenal. Five were found guilty and hanged. In 1863 Decatur was headquarters for 1st District of state militia. This was the second line of defense for the frontier which backed up the line of old U.S. posts located 105 miles to the west. 70 miles west were the frontier regiment outposts from the Red River to the Rio Grande. These militiamen served to protect this part of the frontier yet were able to work their farms. Late in the war, deserters came through the county. In April 1865, men from Wise and Cooke counties captured nearly 100 on their way to New Mexico. Erected by the State of Texas 1963. #5877

Main Street, Decatur, TX, United States

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First National Bank of Decatur. This financial institution was organized in 1883 by Decatur bankers Dan Waggoner, Henry Greathouse, and other pioneer businessmen. Waggoner's son, W. T. Waggoner (b. 1854), a prominent Texas cattleman and oilman, served as bank president from 1904 until his death in 1934. His sound leadership enabled the bank to survive the Depression and become a leader in developing the Wise County area. Located on Decatur's town square for over eighty years, the First National Bank moved to this site in 1966.

306 W. Main St., Decatur, TX, United States

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Texas Ranger Captain Ira Long. Dedicated and courageous. Born in Indiana; reared in Missouri. Wounded twice in Confederate service during the Civil War. On reorganization of Texas Rangers, 1874, was commissioned first lieutenant; promoted 1875 to captain, Company A, official escort of Major John B. Jones, Commander of Ranger Force. Did outstanding duty against Indians and outlaws, and in quieting such feuds as Mason County War. Served for six years. #5268

CR 4226, S of Decatur, Decatur, TX, United States

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Charles Vernon Terrell. A leading public man in Texas, 1896-1939. Born in Wise County to early (1854) settlers. After two years at Texas A & M, read law and began practice in 1886. Served 1888-92 as Decatur City attorney; 1892-96 as county attorney; 1896-1901 and 1909-13 from Denton-Montague-Wise counties, in Texas Senate. There he sponsored act creating North Texas State University. He was state treasurer of Texas from 1921 to 1924. Appointed in 1924 to the Texas Railroad Commission (chairman 2 terms), he served during landmark years when Texas was catapulted into role of a major world energy supplier. Through regulation of oil and gas shipping, the Railroad Commission became the agency for making production rules. When East Texas in the 1930s began to produce oil in volumes such as the world had never known, and the state invoked martial law to quell strife there, Commissioner Terrell and associates pioneered in conservation without the sacrifice of industrial leadership. After his retirement in 1939, his native county had an oil discovery at Park Springs, in 1942. The Chico field came in with larger yields in 1947. C. V and Etta (May) Terrell were parents of Tully Vernon, John Preston, and Margaret (Mrs. F. . Ward). (1972) #822

Main Street, Decatur, TX, United States

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Randolph Vesey. Respected Negro citizen and homeowner. Champion pioneer fiddler, popular at Forts Belknap, Griffin and Richardson and over county. Once when he was an Indian captive, held in Kansas, Texans sent ponies to ransom him. He is buried in Oak Lawn, Decatur. Born in Georgia. He served during the Civil War as body servant and voluntary battle aide to General W. L. Cabel of the Confederate army. Vesey's courage and loyalty were typical. Hundreds of slaves went to war with masters. Many operated farms and ranches of soldiers away at war, producing cotton and food for the Confederacy. Others did work for hire, with wages supporting the master's family. On patrol duty they protected homes from Indians, bandits, outlaws. During War years, 1861-1865, some 30,000 to 50,000 Negros - free and slaves - aided Confederate armies. They served with the Nitre and Mining Bureau and departments of medicine, engineers, quartermaster general, ordnance and commissary general. They built fortifications on coasts from Brownsville, Texas, to Norfolk, Virginia, and at inland points. Many were army teamsters, wheelwrights, blacksmiths, butchers, shoemakers, cooks, and nurses. Texas and other states later provided land grants and pensions for army. (1965) #4194

State Street, at Courthouse, Decatur, TX, United States

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Randolph (Uncle Ran) Vesey. Born a slave near Savannah, Georgia, Randolph Vesey was body servant to Confederate General William Lewis Cabel during the Civil War. In 1868, while living on the Montague-Wise County line, Vesey was captured by Indians and taken to Kansas. Black scout Brit Johnson ransomed Vesey with horses contributed by friends in Texas. A natural musician, Vesey often played the violin at dances in this area. He married Missouri (Zoe) Light and had two children. Recorded 1979. #4192

Cemetery Road, Decatur, TX, United States

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Decatur First United Methodist Church. Organized in 1862, this congregation is the oldest in Decatur. The Reverend J. R. Bellamy conducted the first services in a vacant store on the south side of the town square. Other churches were not started in the community until after the Civil War. Instrumental leaders in the development of the young church were charter members Stephen M. Gose and his wife Mary. A blacksmith and farmer, Gose had migrated to this area from Missouri. Their home and pump organ were used for many of the early services. The first sanctuary was constructed at this site in 1881. Property for the congregation was deeded by the county government. Built during the pastorate of the Reverend E. D. Dejernet, the edifice was destroyed by fire in the early 1890s. A second church structure for the fellowship was soon built at this location. It served the growing membership until the present brick sanctuary was completed. Constructed under the leadership of the Reverend A. R. Nash, it was dedicated at Easter services in 1914. An educational wing was added in 1940.

104 S. Miller, Decatur, TX, United States

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Texas Tourist Camp Complex. Local businessman E. F. Boydston (1888-1945) purchased this site, a former feed lot, in 1927 for $400. Recognizing a potential business opportunity in offering services to the traveling public, he built a wooden shed and gas station in 1927. Travelers were allowed to build campfires during overnight stays, and by 1931 Boydston added three wooden cabins with garages to the camp complex. The buildings later were faced with rock, and more cabins and garages were added in 1935. The original wooden gas station was covered with petrified wood in 1935 when the highway was widened and remained in operation by the Boydston family until 1988. The Texas Lunchroom, a one-room frame building, was built in 1929. Renamed the Texas Cafe in 1935 and faced with stone to match other buildings in the complex, it was enlarged to provide second-floor living quarters. Popular with local high school and college students, as well as families and the traveling public, it was closed in the 1960s after a highway bypass built west of town diverted traffic from this area. The cafe reopened in 1993. One of the few intact examples of tourist camps built throughout Texas in the mid-20th century, this property is significant for its association with the early development of automobile tourism. #5275

US 81/87 - 900 Block, Decatur, TX, United States

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Rush Creek Community Cemetery. Named for a stream that flowed through the area, the community of Rush Creek contained a school, two churches, and a cemetery. The oldest recorded burial is that of Harry Houston, infant son of John and Mary Houston, who died in 1875. The site contains 110 graves; nearly half are those of children under 20 years of age. Also buried here are veterans of the Civil War and World War I. Rush Creek community declined in the 1930s when families left due to land erosion. Still active, the cemetery is maintained by descendants of those buried here. (1998) #12312

?, Decatur, TX, United States

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