United States / Gonzales, TX

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King Cemetery. #17207

Hwy 90A, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Reese Family Home (DEMOLISHED). #14824

518 St. Francis St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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Eggleston House. -- #1405

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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African American Education. Education for American Negro citizens of Gonzales began in the 1870s at the home of Myrtle Moses Mathis. More formalized instruction took place in the 1890s when the school occupied a 2-story community building. A brick schoolhouse was erected about 1914 on land donated by W.M. Fly and Josephine K. Peck. It was named George Edwards High School in 1922 and served 300 students and 8 teachers by 1940. Edwards High School was closed in 1964 as schools were desegregated in compliance with the federal Civil Rights Act. The school was sold in the 1970s. (1997) #91

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Old Eighteen. On this site, September 29, 1835 began the strategy of the 18 Texans who by advising with alcalde Andrew Ponton, held for two days 150 Mexican Dragoons sent to demand the Gonzales cannon, allowing colonists time to mass recruits for the Battle of Gonzales. Captain Albert Martin, Almond Cottle, Jacob C. Darst, Ezekiel Williams, Winslow Turner, Simeon Bateman, Wm. W. Arrington, Joseph D. Clements, Gravis Fulcher, Almaron Dickerson, George W. Davis, Benjamin Fuqua, John Sowell, Valentine Bennet, James B. Hinds, Charles Mason, Thomas R. Miller, Thomas Jackson. #13

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Jesse Kencheloe Davis. A San Jacinto veteran, born in Alabama, January 11,1802. Died December 28, 1869. His wife Eliza Davis born in Alabama, May 12, 1819. Died January 11, 1875. #1181

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Andrew Ponton. In memory of Andrew Ponton, Alcalde Author of the historic letter written on Sept. 26, 1835, in reply to Mexico's demand for the colonists' cannon at Gonzales. One of the defenders of Gonzales, October 2, 1835. #164

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Andrew Zumwalt. A San Jacinto veteran, born September 1, 1817; died November 1, 1886. #165

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Dikes Family Cemetery. Established about 1850 by Miles G. Dikes (1804-1872). An original member of DeWitt Colony, Dikes emigrated from Georgia in 1829. In 1839 , married Eady Hodges (1810-1868). First known burial, in 1859, was Dikes' son, Lovic. Cemetery contains 20 marked graves; other are unmarked. Still in use by descendants. #1224

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Bennet Valentine. From 1835 to his death in 1843 he fought to gain and maintain Texas Independence. #371

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Brown House. N/A #532

834 Mitchell St, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Mathew Caldwell. #624

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Campsite Marking Start of San Jacinto Campaign. On March 11, 1836, Sam Houston, leader of Texas Revolutionary Forces, arrived here to organize the second volunteer army. On March 13, he heard of the massacre of Alamo defenders and that the Mexican army was advancing toward Gonzales. He ordered the town burned so that the enemy might find no food or shelter upon their arrival. He then marched east, establishing his next camp at "Sam Houston Oak" (10 miles east). After several weeks of maneuvering his forces into an advantageous position, he led them to victory at San Jacinto on April 21. #690

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Central Square. James Kerr in 1825 was appointed to select and survey a capital for the Mexican land grant colony of Green DeWitt. Kerr named this Gonzales, for Don Rafael Gonzales, then governor of Coahuila and Texas. A 49-block square composed the inner town. This was Central Square. #795

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Charles Mason. Star and Wreath A volunteer soldier who fought for Texas Independence at Gonzales and San Jacinto. Erected by the State of Texas, 1962 #819

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Charles T. Rather House. #821

828 St. Louis St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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1834 Homesite of Capt. and Mrs. Almaron Dickinson. #1221

226 St. James St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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Edward Dickinson. Star and Wreath A citizen soldier and volunteer in the San Jacinto Campaign, 1836. #1222

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Gonzales City Cemetery. By tradition, remains of early settlers buried at first in Cemetery Square, inner town of Gonzales, rest here in a common grave. Others buried here include key men in Texas Revolution, Dr. George W. Barnett, Maj. Valentine Barnett ( quartermaster ), and Matthew Caldwell. #2216

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Gonzales College. #2217

820 St. Louis St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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Gonzales County Jail. #2218

414 St. Lawrence St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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Dr. Thomas Polk. Star and Wreath Born February 7, 1792, he served Texas and the men who fought for her independence at the Siege of Bexar and the San Jacinto Campaign 1835-36. Died February 2, 1872. Erected by the State of Texas, 1962 #1281

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Site of Confederate Fort. Surveyed 1864 by Lt. Col. Albert M. Lea. Built to fortify Gonzales against attack by Federal gun boats. Constructed from stones of male building of Gonzales College. Marker placed by Texas Society, Children of the American Revolution, 1961. #1025

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Gonzales Courthouse. #2219

414 St. Joseph St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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Gonzales Memorial Museum and Amphitheatre. -- #2220

414 Smith St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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First Methodist Church of Gonzales. #1756

426 St. Paul St., Gonzales, TX, United States

James hodges historical marker
James Hodges, Sr.. James Hodges, Sr., came to Gonzales in April 1835. Soon after his arrival he purchased four leagues (17,721 acres) of land at the forks of the San Marcos and Guadalupe Rivers for $3,000 in silver. On September 26, 1835, in a election held under the auspices of the Gonzales Committee of Public Safety, Hodges was elected one of six delegates to the Consultation of 1835. Convened in San Felipe de Austin on November 3, delegates to the Consultation created a provisional government and organized an army under the command of Sam Houston. Returning to Gonzales after the Consultation, Hodges provided supplies for the Texas army in 1836. He and his family left the area during the runaway scrape, but later returned to Gonzales County. In 1838 Hodges served on the County's Board of Land Commissioners. Twice married, James Hodges was the father of eight children. He and his family continued to live on their land on the San Marcos and Guadalupe rivers. After his death on December 24, 1846, Hodges was buried on the family farm in a plot which became known as the Hodges Family Cemetery (about one mile southeast). #2725

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Ebenezer Cemetery. Found in the 1850s during Texas' early statehood, this burial ground served the Ebenezer community and southern Gonzales County. Ebenezer Church, built by Baptists and later serving a Methodist congregation, was located near the cemetery entrance and probably housed a school. The church closed in the early 1900s, but the cemetery remains as an important reminder of Ebenezer settlement. Maintained by descendants of pioneer families, the cemetery contains graves of government officials, military veterans, and pioneer settlers. #1375

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Eli Mitchell. Star and Wreath He fought at Gonzales and furnished supplies to the Texas army, 1835. Delegate to the 1833 Convention. Erected by the State of Texas, 1962 #1448

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Episcopal Church of the Messiah. #1491

711 St. Louis St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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John Fauth House. #1578

521 St. Peter St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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First Baptist Church of Gonzales. #1634

422 St. Paul St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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Fleming T. Wells. Star and Wreath Born in Orange County; purser in the Texas Navy. Secretary to Captain Jeremiah Brown of the Invincible, died June 2, 1844. Erected by the State of texas, 1962 #1913

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Fort Waul. Named for Confederate General Thomas N. Waul, Fort Waul was built to defend inland Texas from possible Federal advances up the Guadalupe River from the Gulf of Mexico, as well as to provide protection for military supply trains. Construction of the earthen fortification was overseen by Col. Albert Miller Lea, Confederate army engineer. Begun in late 1863, the fort was partly built by slave labor and measured approximately 250 by 750 feet. Surviving records do not indicate whether the fort was ever actually completed. #2025

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Gonzales Cannon Dispute, Site of. #15284

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Chenault House (DEMOLISHED). #15304

324 St. Paul St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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Gonzales Cannon Burial Site. Three days later it was mounted on ox-cart wheels, loaded with chains and scrap iron, and fired at the Mexican army, the first shot of the revolution. This location was known as George W. Davis Peach Orchard #2215

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Gonzales Cannon. On this site September 29, 1835, the Mexican government troops demanded the return of the Gonzales cannon. After two days delay, awaiting recruits, the colonists answered, "come and take it." #2214

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Holmes Hospital. #2513

1118 St. Louis St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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Indian Fort, Site of. An Indian raid July 2, 1826, left one Gonzales settler dead, another shot, homes plundered. Settlers fled to Burnham Station on the Colorado, or moved to Lavaca River. In 1827 DeWitt's Colonist were ordered back here. On this lot they built a fort for security. #2634

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Kerr's Creek. Commissioned to found a capital for colony of Green DeWitt, ex-Missouri state senator James Kerr settled here. He and six other men built homes on this stream--known ever since as Kerr's Creek. After a destructive Indian raid in 1826, the settlement was abandoned. #2930

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Kerr's Settlement. -- #2931

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Augustus H. Jones. Star and Wreath He fought for Texas Independence at Goliad and at the Storming of Bexar, 1835. Erected by the State of texas, 1962 #2847

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Kennard House. Built 1895 by James B. and Anna Jones Kennard. Of "Queen Anne" style, house remained until 1963 in Kennard family. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1967 Incise on base: Restored 1965-67 by Mr. and Mrs. Julius A. Bauch #2924

621 St. Louis, Gonzales, TX, United States

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David L. Kokernot. Star and Wreath A soldier, officer, scout and courier in the Texas War for Independence, 1835-36. Erected by the State of Texas, 1962 #2973

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Military Plaza. To comply with wishes of governor of Coahuila and Texas, the 1825 plans for Gonzales followed usual plans for Spanish towns. Surveyed by James Kerr, agent for colony's contractor, Green DeWitt, and Kerr's assistant, Byrd Lockhart. This was named Military Plaza. #3373

400 St. Louis St., Gonzales, TX, United States

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Mitchel Putnam. Star and Wreath Veteran, Texas War for Independence. Wounded at San Jacinto, 1836. Erected by the State of Texas, 1962 #3420

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Plaza. Gonzales town tract of 4 square leagues had 49 squares in inner city -- 7 of these squares for public use. This one was for municipal building, but became plaza. Now called Texas Heroes Square, in honor of all Gonzales men who fought in the Texas Revolution. #4045

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Route of Gen. Sam Houston to San Jacinto. Stricken with news of the fall of the Alamo and threatened by a massive Mexican army, Sam Houston gathered the nucleus of a Texan army here, issued orders to burn this town (to hinder the Mexicans) and marched east, March 13, 1836. He won Victory at San Jacinto, April 21. #4367

?, Gonzales, TX, United States

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Sam Houston Oak. 1/8 mile north is Sam Houston Oak where General Sam Houston established his headquarters camp March 13, 1836, after burning the town of Gonzales. Under this oak his small army was joined by many volunteers from the eastern settlements, who went with him to San Jacinto. #4503

?, Gonzales, TX, United States