United States / Midland, TX

all or unphotographed
Midland County's First Water Well. #15111

?, Midland, TX, United States

Army Flying School, Site of Old. #14231

?, Midland, TX, United States

Dorsey Home. Z. Taylor Brown, builder. Ornate trim, art glass window. Two fireplaces, oak mantels. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1965 #1256

213 N Weatherford St., Midland, TX, United States

Midland's First House. Of concrete blocks, 1908. Western Ranch style. Home of Raymond and Edith Lawrence. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1965. #3369

1017 N Loraine St., Midland, TX, United States

First Post Office in Midland. When first Post Office opened here Jan. 4, 1884, with Charles H. Welch as postmaster, settlers proposed to name the town Midway, because it was halfway between Ft. Worth and El Paso. Finding that another post office in Texas had that name, they chose Midland instead. Site of the first post office was 108 East Missouri, location of main loading dock of the current facility. Postal headquarters moved four times before returning to the original site upon completion of the new federal building (1974). Midland Post Office now serves a region of 32,000 square miles. #1812

100 E Wall St., Midland, TX, United States

John Valentine Pliska. Mechanical genius who made and flew first locally-owned aircraft. Born in Austria, Pliska came with parents to Texas, and after 1903 followed blacksmith trade in Midland. He built (1912) and flew at intervals up to 15 minutes an aeroplane of his own invention. (plane now in museum at Midland-Odessa air terminal.) Pliska was a master Smith. Gen. John J. Pershing had U. S. Army horses shod here during border trouble prior to World War I. Branding irons for a large west Texas area were also made here. Pliska married Louis Hundle. They had seven children. #2815

Texas & Baird St., Midland, TX, United States

Marcy Trail. Plotted in 1849 by a U. S. Army surveying expedition under Capt. Randolph B. Marcy. Guided by Manuel, a Comanche Indian, Marcy crossed the dreaded staked plains of West Texas, proving their feasibility for travel, and opening a new and shorter road west. Marcy's trail from Dona Ana, N. M., to Fort Smith, Ark., became a major road to the California gold fields. Later the overland stage followed it for about 125 miles and in 1881, Texas and Pacific Railroad built along part of the route. #3206

IH 20, E of Midland 5mi., Midland, TX, United States

Midland County. First known as the junction of many trails and site of the last Comanche raid into Texas. In 1881 the Texas and Pacific Railroad was built; equi-distant between El Paso and Fort Worth, this became known as Midland. First settler was a sheepman in 1882. Cattlemen came with Herefords in 1888. Water wells and windmills lured small farmers. Became headquarters for 1928 Permian Basin oil discovery. In 1945 its first well came in. The "Midland Man", oldest skeletal remains in North America (18,500 B.C.), was found in 1954. #3363

Wall and Colorado St., Courthouse Square, Midland, TX, United States

Midland Man. Oldest human remains in new world. Found 1953 on ranch near here by pipeline welder Keith Glasscock. Fossilized skull, rib and hand bones had been exposed by weather conditions. Tests indicated these were bones of a woman who lived as long ago as 9000-9500 B. C.; nearby were bones of extinct species of horse, camel, mammoth, peccary, wolf, sloth; with weapons, tools and signs of ancient campfires. Drs. Fred Wendorf and Alex D. Kreiger, archaeologists; Claude C. Albritton, geologist; T. D. Stewart, physician and anthropologist, made studies of the discovery. #3367

Wall & Colorado St., Courthouse square, Midland, TX, United States

Midland & Northwestern Railroad. Standard gauge 66-mile line built by David Fasken, Sr., to carry cattle, ranch supplies, passengers. Operated 1916 to 1920 -- critical era of World War I and world starvation aftermath. Linked towns of Fasken, Florey, and Seminole with Texas & Pacific Railway at Midland. At first, operated with locomotive borrowed from T. & P. Train had to stop for pasture gates to be opened. Crew shot coyotes and rattlesnakes. In a breakdown, the passengers were fed, sheltered at Fasken. Work crew slept on the prairie. Floored out in 1920, M. & N. R. was abandoned. Roadbed still is visible. #3360

SH 158 and FM 1788, Midland, TX, United States

Midland Christian College. A 2-year, coeducational college that functioned 1910-1921. H. R. Garrett was first president. Students rode horse-drawn bus to campus; Edith yearbook, "The Sandstorm". Some 250 attended in 1917. Financial stress forced closure. The 3-story gray brick building was later razed. #3362

Kentucky & Mann St., Midland, TX, United States

Greenwood Baptist Church. #15144

?, Midland, TX, United States

Site of Early Water Well. County's first well; dug by hand, 1884, it supplied the entire town. Formerly water had been shipped by rail from Monahans (50 miles W). Well--6 feet wide, 50 feet deep--was equipped with a hand pump and a bucket rest (under spout). It also furnished water for town cattle trough. #4777

100 E. Wall St., Midland, TX, United States

W. F. Scarborough Home,. 1908. Ranch style architecture characteristic of west Texas cattle men. Later enlarged. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1965. #5665

802 S Main St., Midland, TX, United States

Anglin, Captain W. B.. #14674

?, Midland, TX, United States

Scharbauer Hotel (destroyed). #14436

?, Midland, TX, United States

Lawrence Home. #14438

?, Midland, TX, United States

Midland Man (Woman). #14622

?, Midland, TX, United States

Midland County. First known as the junction of many trails and site of the last Comanche raid into Texas. In 1881 the Texas and Pacific Railroad was built ; equi-distant between El Paso and Fort Worth, this became known as Midland. First settler was a sheepman in 1882. Water wells and windmills lured small farmers. Became headquarters for 1928 Permian Basin oil discovery. In 1945 its first well came in . The "Midland Man", oldest skeletal remains in North America (18,500 B. C.), was found in 1954. #3364

US 80 and FM 1788, Midland, TX, United States

Midland County. N/A #3365

US 80, .5 mi. E of Midland, Midland, TX, United States

First Post Office in Midland. #14713

?, Midland, TX, United States

First Christian Church of Midland. Chartered in 1890, the First Christian Church of Midland was organized by sixteen members who met in private homes until 1892. Tradition of service to the church and community began when charter member S. E. Townsend pledged $300 toward the first of two downtown church buildings. The church grew steadily; by 1950 the congregation had erected a large building on the northwestern edge of Midland, making additions as needed. In 1990, the congregation celebrated its 100th anniversary and continues to serve the community with a variety of outreach programs and religious activities. (1997) #12153

1301 W. Louisiana, Midland, TX, United States

Burton-Lingo Company (RAZED). #14812

?, Midland, TX, United States

Midland County's First Producing Oil Well. The discovery of oil in the Permian Basin during the 1920s helped sustain the area economy during the Great Depression, and many oil and gas companies established headquarters in Midland. Not until the 1940s, though, did Midland County begin seeing its own productive oil wells. Geologist H.L. Beckman worked with the Rowan Drilling Company to stake out Humble Oil and Refining Company's No. 1 Mrs. O.P. Buchanan Well at this site. They spudded the well on September 14, 1944 and completed in on November 6, 1945 at a total depth of 12,574 feet. The well produced 332 barrels of oil in 29 hours and became Midland County's first producing oil well. It was plugged on August 1, 1947. (2005) #13403

SH 158, Midland, TX, United States

First Baptist Church of Midland. The First Baptist Church of Midland began serving the city shortly after Midland's founding in 1885. That year, Baptists from Pecos, Big Spring and Midland agreed to hire the Rev. S.B. Callaway to serve the three congregations. Under his leadership, a group organized this church in 1886, erecting a building shortly afterwards. Over the years, the church expanded and moved twice to accommodate growing membership. During the years following World War II, church growth mirrored Midland's impressive city development due to the region's expanding petroleum industry. Through all this time, the church has been a spiritual and community leader, a position it continues to hold today. (2006) #13657

2104 W Louisiana, Midland, TX, United States

Midland County's First Bank. #14181

?, Midland, TX, United States

First Methodist Church (RAZED). #14886

?, Midland, TX, United States

Texas Petroleum in World War II. #15180

?, Midland, TX, United States

Bush, George W., Childhood Home. #15411

?, Midland, TX, United States

Subjects
Fairview Cemetery. #15613

?, Midland, TX, United States

Subjects
Brown-Dorsey House. Z. Taylor and Sara Brown moved their family to Midland in 1884. A rancher and merchant, Brown had this house built in 1899. Featuring carved wood details, an art glass window, and three fireplaces connected to a single chimney, the house is believed to be the oldest dwelling in Midland. Following the deaths of Sara Brown in 1922 and Z. Taylor in 1930, the house was inherited by their daughter Sara Brown Dorsey. It remained in the family until 1969. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1965 #12152

213 N. Weatherford, Midland, TX, United States

Petroleum Building. T. S. Hogan, a Montana attorney, rancher and oilman, came to the Permian Basin in 1925, where he became active in the oil business. He was convinced Midland was situated in the center of the petroleum basin and that it would become the leading city of the region. In 1927 he announced the construction of this building, which would serve as a center for the area oil companies. Designed by the prominent Fort Worth architect Wyatt C. Hedrick, it was completed in 1929. A formal dedication was held on July 4 of that year. Many believed that Hogan's enterprise signaled Midland's future as a major oil production center. The projections, unfortunately, were premature. Only months after the building was completed, the stock market crash occurred that resulted in the Great Depression of the 1930s. With the discovery of oil in East Texas, the price soon dropped to 15$ a barrel. Many companies closed their Midland offices and it was not until 1935 that they began to return to the Permian Basin. When Midland eventually became a leading center of oil production as Hogan had earlier envisioned, the petroleum building played a significant role in the town's development. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1982. #4002

214 W Texas, Midland, TX, United States

George W. Bush Childhood Home. George Herbert Walker Bush and wife Barbara (Pierce) came to Texas in 1948, moving to Midland with son George Walker Bush in 1950. They bought this home in 1951 and while here faced the loss of daughter Robin and celebrated the birth of two sons. The years spent here were vital for young George, who attended Sam Houston Elementary, made lifelong friends and played baseball. The family moved to a larger home in 1955 and then to Houston. This c. 1939 Traditional style house reflects transition from Tudor to Ranch detailing. Unique in history, it was home to two Presidents -- George H.W. and George W. Bush; two Governors -- George W. Bush (TX) and Jeb Bush (FL); and First Lady Barbara Bush. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2004 #13058

1412 W Ohio Ave, Midland, TX, United States

Subjects
Fairview Cemetery. In use by May 31, 1885, 10-acre southeast corner of this tract was accepted as gift of Midland Town Co., by commissioners of newly organized Midland County in their first meeting on Aug. 10, 1885. Veterans of the Mexican War and Civil War are among the pioneers who are buried here. #1551

Nobles and W Pecos St., Midland, TX, United States

Staked Plains. First newspaper published in Midland County. Printed in 1885 in frame building once on this site. Copies were hand-set and hand printed at rate of 5 per hour on old-style press. County court proceedings were printed at .75 cent per square inch. J. C. Rathbun was editor and publisher. (1970) #14

219 W Main St., Midland, TX, United States

Former Site of Midland National Bank. Organized in Odessa on August 22, 1902, as Odessa National Bank, this institution began with an initial capital of $25,000. In June 1903 the shareholders voted to move the bank to Midland and rename it Midland National Bank. Bank offices were set up at this site in the Llano hotel. Built in 1890, the two-story wooden hotel building was a gathering place for ranchers and businessmen. The bank occupied the lower floor of the hotel until 1909, when the structure, along with others in the downtown area, was destroyed by fire. The hotel was rebuilt on the same site, and the bank continued to lease office space. By 1927 the principal business of the bank had shifted from agriculture to the emerging oil industry. A new three-story bank building was erected at the corner of Texas and Big Spring streets in 1953, and a nine-story tower was added in 1957. Midland National and the Bank of the Southwest merged in 1968. In 1976 the bank moved to a new fourteen-story structure at 500 W. Texas. The name of the bank was changed to First City National Bank of Midland in 1983. #1952

105 N Main St., Midland, TX, United States

Midland National Bank. Organized on August 22, 1902, in Odessa as Odessa National Bank, this institution began with an initial capital of $25, 000. Less than one year later the bank's shareholders voted to relocate to Midland and the institution became Midland National Bank. The bank set up offices in the Llano hotel building at the corner of Wall and Main Street. Early leadership for the institution was provided by such prominent people as D.W. Brunson, Andrew Fasken, and Ralph Barron. With its business largely dependent upon the cattle industry, the bank served its customers until a prolonged drought caused an economic crisis which led to its reorganization in 1923. By 1927 the oil industry had become the major business of the bank. Throughout the subsequent "boom and bust" years of the oil business, the bank has continued operations. A new three-story bank building was erected in 1953 on the corner of Texas and Big Spring, and a nine-story tower was added four years after. In a continued period of growth, the bank merged with the Bank of the Southwest in 1968. A new fourteen-story building was completed at this site in 1976. In 1983 the bank's name was changed to First City National Bank of Midland. #3368

500 W Texas, Midland, TX, United States

Site of Midland County's First Bank. First National Bank of Midland. Organized June 16, 1890. First officers were A. W. Hilliard, president; W.H. Cowden, vice president; and W. E. Connell, cashier. Its financial stability has saved its customers from ruin in the face of drouth or other disasters over the years. #4832

Main and Wall St., Midland, TX, United States

Site of Old Midland Army Flying School. Old Sloan Field, built 1931, in 1942 became Midland Army Flying School, for bombardier cadets. At one time it was called largest bombardier training center in the world. One of over 25 World War II airfields in Texas, its cadets flew 861,510 hours in Beech "AT-11" aircraft, dropping 1,245,107 bombs. Last class of cadets graduated in Jan. 1945. The field was used as an Army Air Forces instructor school (bombardier) until World War II ended later that year. After military phase-out, 1947, commercial field opened 1950. #4854

FM 217 off FM 1788, at Midland County Airport, Midland, TX, United States

Yucca Theatre. Attracted by Midland's growing economy and the rapid development of the area's petroleum industry, T.S. Hogan announced plans for the construction of this facility in 1927. An oilman and former Montana senator, Hogan saw the need for a multi-purpose theatre to serve the growing population of the permian basin. He commissioned noted Fort Worth architect Wyatt C. Hedrick to design the structure. The result was an elaborate facade with intricate Gothic revival detailing. The interior was designed by H. B. Layman of New York and features characteristics of the Egyptian revival style. The Yucca Theatre opened on December 5, 1929, after two years of construction. The premier included a screening of the Hollywood musical "Rio Rita" and a musical comedy revue by the jubilee players of New York City. The versatility of the building's design made the Yucca Theatre suitable for a variety of activities. Despite the 1930s economic depression, it remained a popular place for traveling vaudeville shows, operas, it serves as a reminder of Midland's early growth as a center of the petroleum industry. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1981. #5935

208 N Colorado St., Midland, TX, United States

W. B. Anglin. A member, Company B, Frontier Battalion of Texas Rangers. Killed near here while trailing Comanche Indian raiding party on July 1, 1879. He was buried on the spot where he fell. A native of Virginia, member of one of its first families, he joined rangers in 1875 at about age 25. Anglin was last man to be killed by Indians in central west Texas. He was known for his bravery, kindness, good humor and unceasing devotion to duty. #5664

Nobles and N Pecos St., Midland, TX, United States

Fairgrounds Road. #15318

?, Midland, TX, United States