United States / Pampa, TX

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Gray County. #15289

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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Gray County 50th Year Anniversary. Lest We Forget; Gray County; 50th Year Anniversary; 1902-1952; Dedicated to our early day pioneers, through whose efforts Gray County was established. And who contributed so much to our 50 years of progress. #2261

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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Gray County. Formed from Young and Bexar Territories; Created August 21, 1876; Organized May 27, 1902; Named in Honor of Peter W. Gray 1819-1874; Member of the First Legislature of Texas; Member of the Confederate Congress; Appointed to the Texas Supreme Bench in 1874; County Seat, Lefors, 1902; Pampa, Since 1928 #2259

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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Pampa. In 1888 a telegraph station on the Southern Kansas Railroad developed here, and was named Glasgow. Renamed Sutton a year later, a post office was established in 1892 and the town was named Pampa by George Tyng (d. 1906), manager of the White Deer Land Company. Surveyor A. H. Doucette (1884-1964) laid out the town in 1902. The first school opened in 1903 and the first church was organized in 1906. J. N. Duncan (1858-1941) became Pampa's first mayor in 1912. Following a 1920s oil boom, the county seat was moved here from Lefors in 1928. #3922

1 Albert Square, Pampa, TX, United States

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Pampa City Hall. Construction of this and other major downtown buildings in Pampa came as a result of the Texas Panhandle Oil Boom of the late 1920s and early 1930s. Designed by architect William R. Kaufman to complement the Gray County Courthouse, which he also designed, the City Hall was completed in December 1930. The beaux arts style building features triumphal arch entrances with classical detailing and pilaster elements around the perimeter. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1987 #3923

1 Albert Square, Pampa, TX, United States

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Pioneer Cottage. Built in 1903, one year after county was organized, by settlers Wiley Vincent and wife Katie. This small early Texas cabin has 2 rooms. In 1907, huge prairie fire missed it by only 600 yards. The cabin was bought in 1920 by E. S. Carr, Pampa mayor, 1917-1918 and 1938-1940. He gave it as a wedding present to daughter Edna and her husband Clifford Vincent, a son of the builders. In 1963, the Cliff Vincents gave the cabin for use as a museum to the Pampa Genealogical and Historical Society. It has been furnished with period pieces and restored to original appearance. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1970. #4027

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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Rescue of Two White Girls by Lt. Frank Baldwin. Ten miles southwest of here Lieutenant Frank D. Baldwin commanding two companies of United States troops attacked a large band of Cheyenne Indians and rescued two white girl captives, November 8, 1874. #4250

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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White Deer Land Building. #5782

116 S. Cuyler St., Pampa, TX, United States

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Red River Expedition of 1852. In 1852, U.S. Army Captain and explorer of the Southwest Randolph B. Marcy and George B. McClellan, later Democratic candidate for President against Abraham Lincoln, led Company D, 5th Infantry into the Texas Panhandle to locate the headwaters of the Red River. Their findings had great impact on the determination of Texas' border with the State of Oklahoma. Until the 1852 journey, it was not known that there are two large branches of the Red River that intersect the 100th meridian, which forms the eastern boundary of the Texas Panhandle. On June 16th, the company discovered the headwaters of the North Fork (approx. 1 mi. SE). On July 1st, they found the source of the southern, or Prairie Dog Town, fork in Palo Duro Canyon. Marcy's report to Congress is one of the earliest known written records of Gray County. Since several early treaties had used the Red River as a boundary and since there was an extensive area of land between the two branches, the question arose as to which fork was in the minds of the contracting parties when the boundary was first defined. Marcy testified before a Congressional Committee that the South Fork should be the boundary, and an 1896 Supreme Court decision confirmed his findings. (1984) #4217

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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George B. McClellan. West Point graduate George B. McClellan (1826-1885) was a U.S. Army engineer and a member of an expedition led by Randolph B. Marcy that explored the Texas Panhandle in 1852. McClellan Creek was named for him, and nearly a century later Lake McClellan was named in his honor. He was vice president and chief engineer of the Illinois Central Railroad and served as a Union general during the Civil War. He designed the McClellan saddle used by the U.S. Army. He ran for president in 1864 against Abraham Lincoln and served as governor of New Jersey from 1878-1881. (1996) #2149

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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Indian Battlefield. In this vicinity Lieutenant Frank D. Baldwin, commanding two companies of United States troops, attacked a large band of Indians and rescued two white girl captives, November 8, 1874. #2629

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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Gray County Courthouse. A fine example of a beaux arts courthouse with Georgian ornamentation, this structure was erected after the county seat was moved from Lefors in 1928. The edifice was designed by W. R. Kaufman & Son of Amarillo and built by Harland L. Case & Co. of Pampa. It was dedicated on April 19, 1930. Built upon a foundation of Indiana limestone, the steel frame and many windows give a modern look to the traditional beaux arts style. Kaufman designed Pampa's city hall and fire station in a similar style. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1997 #11902

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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Vittorio Emanuel von Brunow, M. D.. (October 27, 1862 - May 7, 1941) Born in North Carolina, Vittorio von Brunow moved to east Prussia with his family in 1864 and as a young man was educated in Vienna and Warsaw. He returned to the United States in 1892 to pursue his interests in research and technology, arriving in Texas in 1900 and in Pampa three years later. Von Brunow erected a frame house on this site from which he operated a drugstore and post and telephone offices in addition to his medical practice. As the area's first doctor, he often traveled many miles over dirt roads to care for his patients. Von Brunow also was active in community affairs and civic organizations for many years. (1998) #11903

101 S. Cuyler, Pampa, TX, United States

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Woody Guthrie. American folk musician Woodrow Wilson "Woody" Guthrie (1912-1967) moved to Pampa from his native Oklahoma at age 17. Here he learned to play the guitar and joined with other musicians to perform for area events. Guthrie briefly attended Pampa High School and, from 1930 until 1935, worked as a soda jerk at this site, home of the former Harris Drug Store. He also spent much time reading books in the Pampa city library, preparing him for his most productive years as a poet-lyricist and folk balladeer during the 1940s and early 1950s. He left Pampa for California in 1937 and in 1940 went to New York City, where he was recognized for his writings and performances. He died there in 1967. (2002) #12619

320 S. Cuyler St., Pampa, TX, United States

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Fairview Cemetery. Fairview Cemetery Established 1904 Historic Texas Cemetery - 2004 #13230

1500 N Duncan, Pampa, TX, United States

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First National Bank. #14538

100 North Coyler St., Pampa, TX, United States

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Peter W. Gray. (Front) Star and Wreath County Named for Texas Confederate 1819-1876 Virginia-born, came to Texas 1838. Aided 1839 removal Texas Shawness. Officer in Milam Guards, Texas Republic. Political, cultural leader in Houston, Republic, State, and Confederacy: he was district attorney, judge, Justice Texas Supreme Court, Legislator in Texas and C.S.A. Delegate to Texas Secession Convention that raised troops to seize U.S. forts, provided for Texas frontier defense, and ratified C.S.A. Constitution. (Back) Gray in 1864 became Treasury Agent for the "amputated" C.S.A. Sector West of the Mississippi River. There, in effect, he was Treasury Secretary for a land in chaos. Smuggled currency was scarce. Often it was hijacked. No western press could be found to print notes. Couriers and Pony Express were Gray's "wireless" to the Confederate capital. Ammunition, arms, medicines, factory goods vital to the war effort had to be imported for Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, as well as for Texas. Blockade-runners exported cotton via Havana to Europe. Cattle and cotton went to market in Mexico, as Gray served the gallant Confederacy. A Memorial to Texans Who Served the Confederacy. Erected by the State of Texas 1963 #3997

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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1934 Pampa Post Office Building. #36

120 E. Foster, Pampa, TX, United States

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First Methodist Church of Pampa. Five charter members established the First Methodist Church in 1906, the first denomination organized in Pampa. In 1908 a one-room white church with a steeple was built. This church site was purchased in 1924, and a new sanctuary was completed in 1928. Additional buildings and land were acquired as the congregation grew and renovations to the structures were made. The church provides many educational and worship activities for its members and supports the community with several outreach programs. The First Methodist Church has served the area for more than 90 years. (1996) #1765

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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Site of Pampa Army Air Force Base. In the early 1940s Pampa Mayor Fred Thompson and a delegation from the city's Chamber of Commerce traveled to Washington, D.C. to promote this area as a possible site for a military base. Attracted by the terrain, climactic history, available land and community response, Army officials chose this site for the establishment of an installation to train pilots and support personnel for World War II. Construction of the Pampa Army Air Force Base began in June 1942, under the direction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma office of the Corps of Engineers. Overseeing the initial stages of the operation was Col. Norman B. Olsen. Temporary offices were set up in the Rose Motor Company and Culberson-Smalling buildings in town. Col. Daniel S. Campbell became the commanding officer in September 1942, and within two months the first planes and aviation cadets had arrived. The Pampa Army Air Force Base closed September 30, 1945, after just three years of operation. During that time 6,292 aviation cadets and 3,500 mechanics were trained. The base's safety record was one of the best in the U.S. Training Command during World War II. Despite a brief history, the base had a dramatic impact on the development of the Pampa area. (1982) (1982) #4870

?, Pampa, TX, United States

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Combs-Worley Building. Designed by Amarillo architects W. R. Kaufman & Son, this structure was erected in 1931 to house the offices of the Combs-Worley ranching and oil interests and Pampa professions and businesses. Modern art deco architectural influences appear on the edifice in typical classical rhythm and form. Metal casement windows and storefront details further enhance the building's expression of the 1930s and the new wealth of the oil boom era. The Kaufman's other Pampa projects include the county courthouse (1929), city hall and central fire station (both 1930). All are part of Pampa's "million dollar row." Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1998 #11901

120 W. Kingsmill, Pampa, TX, United States

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Wayside Community. Settlers came to this locality in 1876. The county was organized in 1889. Pioneer school district no. 5 originated by court order in 1890 to serve this area with schools known as Tallahone, Poole, and Wayside, taught usually in homes. In 1914, Frederic Foster of New York gave this 2-acre school site to the county. The district bought materials, and patrons erected this 28 x 36-foot schoolhouse, painting it red. It soon became the focus for the community - site for elections, church services, and other activities, as well as housing the Wayside School. The trustees in 1914 were James A. Poole, J. M. Story, and Earl Talley. Despite enrolment fluctuations caused by drouths, oil booms, and other economic factors, Wayside prided itself on scholastic excellence. Beginning in 1929, high school students were transferred by bus into Pampa, Wayside District paying their tuition. In 1933-1934, all grades were transferred - an arrangement used until 1950, when Wayside consolidated with Pampa. White Deer Land Company, successor to original donor Frederic Foster, then deeded the red schoolhouse for continuing community use to trustees Paul Caylor, R. E. Montgomery, and J. T. Roberts. Current trustees are C. W. Osborne, J. T. Rogers, and Jack Sloan. (1974) #5729

SH 70, N of Pampa, Pampa, TX, United States