United States / Rocksprings, TX

all or unphotographed
Edwards county, rocksprings, texas historical marker (7953500938)
Edwards County. Formed from Bexar County; created February 1, 1858. Organized September 10, 1883. Named in honor of Haden Edwards 1771-1849. Empresario leader of the Fredonian War in 1827. County seat, Leakey 1883 Rocksprings, since 1890. #1401

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
Camp Fawcett. Opened 1930. named for E.K. Fawcett, President, Southwest Texas council, Boy Scouts of America. That area--Dimmit, Edwards, Kinney, Maverick, Real, Uvalde, Val Verde, and Zavala counties -- merged in 1943 with the Concho Valley Council. Main Hall is named for 1930 camping chairman, V.A. Brown. (1967) Marker to be dedicated October 1, 1967 #662

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
Thurman Cemetery. Joseph and Mary Jane (Dusenbury) Thurman came to this part of Edwards county in 1882. In 1885, Mary Jane was the first to be buried in what became the Thurman Family Cemetery. Grave markers record infant deaths and victims of typhoid and other diseases that plagued the pioneers. Members of the Thurman, Self, Ellis, Donaghe, Parham, Maddux, Quigg, Loden, Fulkerson, Wilkerson, Chapman, Lazerine, Wallace, Bolding, and Remley families are buried in the 29 gravesites. Last used in 1958, the cemetery is maintained by Thurman family descendants. (1985) #5488

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Edwards county, rocksprings, texas historical marker (7914383976)
Edwards County. Atop the Edwards Plateau, extending into the scenic Nueces Valley. Angora goat capital of the world. The economy is based on ranching. Wild game is abundant. Created in 1858 and organized 1883 from old Bexar district. Named for Haden Edwards (1813-1865), an early leader and colonizer in Texas. First county seat was Leakey; present boundaries were created, and county seat was moved on April 13, 1891, to Rocksprings. First courthouse and jail were built that year. After a fire in 1897, the present courthouse was erected; it withstood a destructive tornado that claimed 72 lives in the county in 1927. First officials to serve the county (1891-1893) as it is presently constituted were the following: James M. Hunter, County Judge; W. M. Sanford, County and District Clerk; Ira L. Wheat, Sheriff and Tax Collector; S.A. Hough, County Attorney; W.H. Cowan, County Treasurer County Commissioners: John Eaton, Precinct No. 1; C. H. Kirchner, Precinct No. 2; H. Schweithelm, Precinct No. 3; M. M. Bradford, Precinct No. 4 (1967) #1400

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
Old Carson Store. First stone store in town; built 1920-21 by G. M. Carson, merchant. His 1904 general store (on this site) was for years only establishment in county selling caskets. Present store withstood 1927 tornado that killed 72 here; is still owned by the Carson family. (1968) #3702

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Rocksprings telephone company, rocksprings, texas historical marker (7906458768)
Rocksprings Telephone Company. (Southwest Texas Telephone Company) Local businessman Street Gilmer and D. H. Comparette of Kerrville built a long distance telephone line from Rocksprings to Kerrville in 1898. They installed the town's first telephone in Newton & Smart's store. The phone was later moved to Gilmer's Drug Store; this marked the beginning of the Rocksprings Telephone Company. Telephone customers in the early 20th century used crank-handled magneto wall phones to contact telephone operators. As many as seventeen parties shared each phone line. A 1927 tornado impaired many of the Rocksprings lines and devastated the town. Telephone company employee Foster Owens left his home in the unstable weather to clear the toll lines by hand and call for assistance from Kerrville. Following the tornado, the telephone company built a new rock building. The 1950s brought major changes for the growing company. Street Gilmer died in February 1951 and his son Claud, a former state legislator and speaker of the House, became president of the company. In 1952 the Rocksprings exchange purchased the Nueces Canyon Telephone Company. Claud Gilmer's son became general manager in 1953. Over the next decade, the company acquired the Utopia, D'Hanis, and Vinegarroon telephone exchanges. By 1958 every exchange in the company had been converted to the dial system. The Rocksprings and Nueces Canyon Telephone Company became the Southwest Texas Telephone Company in 1983. It continues to be a family business: two of Street Gilmer's grandchildren and five great-grandchildren served on the board of directors one hundred years after the company's inception. (1998) #11855

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
Stopping Place on the Fort Clark-Fort McKavett Military Road. One of many roads built to connect frontier cavalry posts in Texas, this route led south to Fort Clark and north to Fort McKavett (both established in 1852). Rocksprings, located here at the head of the South Llano River, was a natural mid-way rest stop. In 1877 Major John B. Jones' Texas Rangers assembled here to begin a major offensive to capture frontier outlaws. In addition to its military uses, the Fort Clark-Fort McKavett Road provided an accessible route for immigrants, cattle drovers, pioneer ranchers, mail carriers, and freighters. (1968, 1990) #5134

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

The rock spring, rocksprings, texas historical marker (7946609682)
The Rock Spring. Known to early Texans as one inch flow of water out of rocks. Site of a camp for travelers and freighters. Occupants of land around the spring included W. J. Greer, with a sheep camp, 1882; Francis Winans, with a cattle and sheep ranch, 1884; A. O. Burr, farming, about 1885. Cattlemen, including Frank Gray, camped here during roundups. Outlaws in 1880s frequented a hut nearby. Rocksprings Post Office opened 1891 in townsite platted for a new county seat at center of Edwards County. The rock spring still seeps in city and county historic park and playground. (1972) #5417

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Rocksprings cemetery, rocksprings, texas historical marker (7946606976)
Rocksprings Cemetery. The town of Rocksprings traces its beginnings to 1889, when J. R. Sweeten dug the first water well in the area to serve new settlers. Three years later, in 1892, Sweeten donated two acres of land to be used as a community cemetery. There were some burials at this site prior to its formal designation as a cemetery. Two children, Willie J. Blackwell and Ben Smith, were interred here in 1891. Many of the people buried in the Rocksprings Cemetery in the early years were travelers passing through the area. Among the more than one thousand graves are those of victims of a devastating tornado which struck the town of April 12, 1927. Over the years, additional land acquisitions have increased the size of the cemetery. Iron fencing which once surrounded some grave sites was donated to scrap metal drives during World War II. The Rocksprings Cemetery Association, which originated in 1897, was formally chartered by the state in 1967. Through such projects as surveys and landscaping, the association continues to maintain the historic graveyard, which remains as a visible link to the community's past. (1989) #4328

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

First methodist church, rocksprings, texas historical marker (7898154798)
First Methodist Church of Rocksprings. This congregation traces its beginning to organized religious gatherings led by the Rev. D. O. McAllister in a schoolhouse located on property owned by Mary Buswell in 1893. Early worship services were also held in a public schoolhouse and in the county courthouse. Contributors to the church's initial success include donors of land J. R. Stanford, S. A. Hough, and Dave Elms; organizers of Sunday Schools and church socials J. J. Gill, Ira L. Wheat, and Mrs. J. R. Stanford; and donors of buckets filled with silver dollars, saloon owners Herman Fleischer, Sr., Joe Burris and George Newton. The first church structure was built about 1900. It was used by the entire community for religious worship until other church buildings could be erected. A storm and tornado, so severe as to detach the church bell clapper and deposit it five miles away, ripped through the community in 1927 destroying the church structure and killing First Methodist Church minister H. L. Spires and his wife. The congregation quickly recovered and erected a new building in 1928. The congregation has supported missionary work in many parts of the world, including Korea and Zaire. Church pastors have continued the early practice of serving Methodist congregations throughout the county. (1992) #1768

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
Headquarters, American Angora Goat Breeders' Assn.. Formed in Missouri, 1898. Moved to Texas, 1924; to Rocksprings, 1926. Houses complete records on Angora Goats registered in U.S. Pictures of breeders and champion goats on display. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1965 #2418

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
Clinton LaFayette Smith. Clinton (Clint) Lafayette Smith, son of Henry M. and Fanny (Short) Smith, was born in Kendall County, Texas. Clint, age 11, and his brother Jeff, age 9, were kidnapped by Lipan and Comanche Indians while herding sheep near their home in 1871. Clint was adopted by Chief Tasacowadi and lived with the Comanche for five years, until he gave himself up in a trade for Indians imprisoned at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. After returning to his family, Smith became a trail driver and Angora goat breeder. He moved to Rocksprings in 1910 with his wife, Dixie (Dyche), and children. (2001) #12414

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Edwards county courthouse, rocksprings, texas historical marker (7914396302)
Edwards County Courthouse. Late Victorian structure of rusticated limestone, quarried in Southwest Texas. Contractors were Davey and Schott, of Kerrville, 1891. Roof was damaged by 1927 storm that killed 70 people. It was afterward restored. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1973 #1402

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
Hough-Haven. Built 1897 by Samuel A. and Annie Bradford Hough. (Hough was one of first graduates, Texas A & M) Home of attorneys, two county judges, district clerks. Scene of numerous social events. The Houghs still own the "Haven." Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1966. #2578

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Old gilmer hotel, rocksprings, texas historical marker (7939860056)
Gilmer Hotel. Built in 1916 by Jesse Walter Gilmer (1883-1961), the two-story Gilmer Hotel was originally wooden, with an upper gallery on the east and south sides. It was frequented by traveling salesmen as well as local ranchers and other visitors. The dining room was popular with townspeople, and the kitchen provided meals for prisoners in the Edwards County Jail. The hotel sheltered influenza patients during a World War I epidemic and, later, victims of a 1927 tornado. The Gilmer family sold the hotel in 1918. Texas Sesquicentennial 1836-1986 #2186

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
Site of Ranch of the Thurmans of Kickapoo. In 1882 Joe Thurman and sons Bill, Sam and Jess became first permanent settlers on the west prong of the Nueces River. By 1895 neighbors included the Barksdale, Chapman, Cox, Ellis, Haley, Justice, Parham, Silman, and Tabor Families. A brush arbor sheltered the first church, with Virgil Silman and A.J. Cox as preachers, and first school, with Perry Ellis as teacher. Joe Thurman acted as doctor, dentist, and coffin maker for this ranch community. His family raised fine horses for racing. In 1895 they matched their favorite against the horse of John Nance Garner, later U.S. Vice President. (1972) #4876

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Mackenzie trail, edwards county, texas historical marker (7897273366)
Mackenzie Trail. When the U.S. Army built Forts Clark (70 miles southwest) and McKavett (90 miles northeast) in 1852, this frontier trail connected the posts. After Fort Concho was established in 1867, the trail was extended farther north, to present San Angelo. It was later named for Col. Ranald S. Mackenzie, the 1873 commander of Fort Clark, who traveled it in his campaigns against hostile Indians. One of its landmarks was Mackenzie Lake (6.5 miles north), which furnished water for the troops, for cattle drives up the trail, for settlers, and for Texas Rangers on frontier patrols. (1977) #3182

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
Site of Rocksprings' First School Building. First school session in new town of Rocksprings was held in a frame house surrounded by a strong rock wall, in winter of 1891-92. Teachers were a Mr. Cole and a Mr. Vaughn (whose strong voice served instead of a bell to call "Books"). Pupils came from families of Abner Benton, a Mr. Buswell, John Campbell, Charlie Cooper, Julian Gill, West Hill, O. W. Holmes, George Maul, J. R. Sanford, Reuben Stewart, J. R. Sweeten, and Ira Wheat. This school was succeeded by the Gem City Academy, which had 111 students in its second term. (1972) #4880

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
First Baptist Church of Rocksprings. In 1893, an early year in the community's history, a small group of seven organized the Missionary Baptist Church of Christ at Rocksprings. The church disbanded after a few years, but was reborn as Rocksprings Baptist Church in 1898. Seventeen members called the Rev. Dan W. Matthews as their first pastor in that year. The Ladies' Aid Society began in 1900 under Mrs. Matthews. A frame building was erected in 1904; a parsonage followed in 1909. The small church, through the dedication of its members, prospered until 1927, when a tornado devastated the town of Rocksprings. Texans came from far and wide to repair the community and rebuild the Baptist building. The church continued to thrive through the Depression and war years. By 1932 a Mexican American mission sponsored by the Baptists became a full Sunday School; in 1936 the membership of the Baptist church was 157 and in 1949 it was 207. The congregation was active in support of Baptist organizations. Modern brick facilities were dedicated on this site in 1966. In missionary service, community outreach, and devotion to worship, the First Baptist Church of Rocksprings continues to uphold the values and traditions of its pioneer founders. (1998) #11854

508 S. Uvalde, Rocksprings, TX, United States

Nophotosqr c8cff0fa2e124eb250f8f6105b227a36933c2aa31cbf3258895bafaa81e1b932
The "Chaparral". Built about 1895 by J.P. Taylor, from England. Then on the Fort McKavett-Fort Clark Road. In 1907 E.E. and Mary Sproul Morriss, early settlers, bought Taylor's acreage and patented more land. Ranch became social center. "Chaparral" refers to roadrunners and Dwarf Oaks, both numerous here. (1969) Incise on base: Ranch now owned by Mrs. N.S. Ward, the former Margaret Merle Morriss. #5279

?, Rocksprings, TX, United States