United States / Seguin, TX

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Robert D. McAnelly. Star and Wreath Born in Kentucky, 1806; came to Texas in 1835; joined the Texas Army on its way to San Antonio; one of the storming party who entered Bexar, December 5, 1835; died in Guadalupe County, Texas, 1888. Erected by the State of Texas, 1962 #4293

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Hard Scrabble. #5

513 East Nolte, Seguin, TX, United States

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Andrew Herron Home. **BUILDING GONE** #43

906 Mill Road, Seguin, TX, United States

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Andrew Jackson Sowell. Star and Wreath Born in Tennessee 1815; came to Texas about 1829; served in the Army of Texas; a courier from the Alamo, he left the fortress just before it fell to hurry reinforcements and supplies; died about 1882. His wife Lucinda Turner Sowell, born 1827 - died 1883. Erected by the State of Texas 1956 #162

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Black Education in Seguin. Sponsored by the Second Baptist Church, the first public school for blacks in Seguin opened in 1871. Through the efforts of the Rev. Leonard Ilsley (1818-1903), and the Rev. William Baton Ball (1840-1923), a frame school was built on this site, and named Abraham Lincoln School. Ball was the first principal. In 1892, the Lincoln School became a part of the Seguin Public School System. The name was changed to Ball High School in 1925, and ceased to be separate facility for blacks in 1966 when the Seguin Public School System was integrated. Texas Sesquicentennial 1836-1986. #421

225 North Saunders, Seguin, TX, United States

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Tiemann School. Named for Theodore Tiemann, who sold one acre of land to the county school district for $5.00, Tiemann School provided educational, cultural, and recreational opportunities for citizens in this area. Beginning in 1903 as a one-room, one-teacher facility, the school eventually was enlarged to accommodate two teachers and many students. A gathering place for many community events, Tiemann School closed in 1943. Along with other area schools, it was annexed by the Seguin School System in 1949. (1990) #5490

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Campbell Cabin. John Campbell of Ireland, who migrated to Seguin before 1847, possibly built the first room of this log cabin about 1850. In 1851 he returned to his native country and persuaded several family members, including his brother Peter Campbell, to settle here also. A farmer and rancher, Peter lived in the cabin and later enlarged it to accommodate his growing family. The cabin was originally located southwest of Seguin and was the home of Campbell descendants until 1957. Moved to this site in 1979, it now serves as a reminder of the area's pioneer settlers. 1982 #685

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Christ Lutheran Church of Elm Creek. German immigrants who settled in this area began meeting together for worship services in the 1880s. Initially meeting in homes or the local schoolhouse, the group officially organized a Lutheran congregation with the assistance of the Rev. Carl Kreutzenstein. After the first two sanctuaries were destroyed in storms in 1886, a new building was dedicated on February 28, 1887. Worship services were conducted exclusively in the German language until the 1940s. An adjacent historic cemetery, founded in 1886, is maintained by the congregation. 1990 #843

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Colonel James Clinton Neill. Born in North Carolina in 1790; came to Texas in 1831; participated in the storming and capture of Bexar; December 5 to 10, 1835; wounded April 20, 1836 in the skirmish preceding the Battle of San Jacinto; died about 1845 #961

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Claiborne West Home. -- #899

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Ezekiel Smith. A soldier in the Army of Texas in the Mier Expedition, 1842; born in Virginia; died in Seguin, Texas, October 28,1854. #1521

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Elijah Valentine Dale. A San Jacinto veteran. Born in Georgia, February 14, 1807. Died December 14, 1890. His wife Jane Johnson Dale born in Ohio, August 3, 1821. Died June 17, 1896. #1452

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Riverside Cemetery. This cemetery traces its origin to the Smith family graveyard established by early settlers to this area. Ezekiel (1781-1854) and Susanna (1774-1848) Smith and their four sons migrated to Texas from Virginia. In 1837 Ezekiel was granted land in present day Guadalupe County. Their son, French Smith (1809-1880), was one of the first shareholders of the city of Seguin. He donated land for a city park, high school, and Methodist church. In 1880, French Smith deeded the family cemetery to the City of Seguin. A public cemetery north of the Smith Cemetery was founded, and later called Riverside. George B. Hollamon deeded additional land to the city for the cemetery in 1888, and in 1896 a third parcel was deeded by W. E. Goodrich. These cemeteries were combined for a total of 15 acres. Among the more than 2000 burials are those of pioneer settlers, veterans, elected officials, business leaders, clergy, and former slaves. Although well maintained at times, over the years the cemetery fell into disrepair. In 1994 Friends of Riverside Cemetery undertook a complete restoration of the site through voluntary efforts of concerned citizens and descendants of those buried here. The Riverside Cemetery continues to serve the community. (1996) #4279

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Timothy Pickering Jones. Star and Wreath Born November 22, 1814. Entered Texas on his birthday 1835. An officer in the Texas War for Independence 1835-36. Captain of a company in the Mexican War. Colonel Sixth Tennessee Regiment 1861. Died in Texas, October 18, 1904. Erected by the State of Texas 1962 #5494

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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George Washington Lonis. Star and Wreath Came to Texas in 1830; participated in the Texans' campaign against Bexar, 1835; wounded in the Battle of San Jacinto, April 21, 1836; died in Guadalupe County, 1860. Erected by the State of Texas, 1962 #2167

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Hardscramble. Home of Henry and Ben McCulloch, 1841-1853; of Nathaniel Benton, 1858; of Elijah V. Dale, 1871; famous Texas Rangers and veterans all of the Texas Revolution; bravery, skill and courage, were common attributes of men who dared the wilderness of Texas, but no patriots of Texas ever offered greater service than did the McCullochs, Benton and Dale. #2374

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Guadalupe River. One of the earliest explored rivers in Texas. Named for Our Lady of Guadalupe by Spaniard Alonso de Leon in 1689. During 1691-1693, Domingo Teran de Los Rios, Spanish Governor of Texas, maintained a colony on the Guadalupe. In early Anglo-American settlement, 30 or 40 families located along its bank, which formed a boundary of the Power-Hewetson Irish Colony. Near the mouth of the river, historic Victoria was founded, and 60 miles above was Gonzales, where the first shot for Texas freedom was fired, Oct. 2, 1835. The Guadalupe is 250 miles long. (1969) #2300

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Humphrey House. -- #2596

902 North Austin Street, Seguin, TX, United States

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John F. McGuffin. Star and Wreath Born in South Carolina in 1813; came to Texas in 1837; a soldier in the Army of Texas; He participated in the struggle for Independence in 1835 and 1836; died September 10, 1887. Erected by the State of Texas 1956 #2778

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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John N. Sowell. Star and Wreath Born in Tennessee; came to Texas about 1829. Served in the Army of Texas, 1836; brother of Andrew Jackson Sowell, and son of John Sowell, who participated in the Battle of Gonzales; died in 1858. Erected by the State of Texas 1956 #2793

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Jonathan Douglas. Born in Georgia January 7, 1799. He fought for Texas Independence as a private in Captain Splane's Company at San Jacinto. Died December 19, 1857. His wife Nancy Douglas born July 23, 1793. Died February 9, 1860. #2841

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Joseph Sonka House. Czechoslovakian immigrant Joseph Sonka (1849-1924) came to Seguin in 1878. A stonemason by trade, he established a brickyard and cotton gin near this site and in 1881 began construction of this house. He completed it in 1893, the same year he married Annie Klicka (1867-1937). Made of bricks from the Sonka Brickyard, the house is built on an L-plan with Italianate detailing. It served as a community hospital from 1913 to 1915, and has remained in the Sonka Family. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1990 #2866

617 North Guadalupe Street, Seguin, TX, United States

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Juan Seguin. In 1974, the citizens of Seguin brought the remains of Juan Seguin to this city. On July 4, 1976, the Bicentennial Committee and the City of Seguin reinterred the remains of Juan Seguin in a hillside plot overlooking the Guadalupe River Valley. The site (about one mile southwest of here) is above the old road and ford to the south and was well known to Juan Seguin. His grave is covered with a marble slab and the site is a part of the city park system. #2876

205 North River Street, Seguin, TX, United States

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Los Nogales. This structure was built in 1849 for German immigrant Justus Gombert. The one-room adobe structure, later stuccoed and enlarged, was owned from 1849 to 1859 by Joseph Zorn. After the Civil War, the property was used as a campground for members of the Freemen's Bureau. Ben McCulloch owned the property briefly in 1870. Demolition of the house was prevented as the first project of the Seguin Conservation Society in 1952. Los Nogales (Spanish for walnuts), as it is now known, was designated a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark in 1962. (1989) #3128

415 S River St, Seguin, TX, United States

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Colonel Nathaniel Benton. Col. Nathaniel Benton, born in Tennessee 1814, came to Texas in 1835, served in the army, 1836, Texas Ranger, 1858, Confederate Officer, 1861, died in 1872. His wife, Jane Harris Benton, born in 1836, died in 1862. 1936 #937

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Post Oak Community Cemetery. The Post Oak Zion Evangelical Church, established in 1885, served a mostly German community. The families of Gottlieb and Louise Brietzke and Julius and Johanna Schievelbein each donated an acre of land in 1894 to their church for cemetery purposes. The first documented grave in the cemetery is that of 10-year old Julius Radatz who died in 1888. More than 169 graves are contained here including many of the area's pioneer settlers and their descendants. The cemetery contained two large post oaks on the grounds, and continues to serve the local area. (1996) #4088

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Claiborne West. Star and Wreath Born in Tennessee 1803; delegate to the Convention 1832 and the Consultation, 1835. Member of the Council, Provisional. Government of Texas. Delegate to the Convention, March 2, 1836 and signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence; soldier and Congressman Republic of Texas. Died September 10, 1866. Erected by the State of Texas 1962 #898

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Saffold Dam. Named for William Saffold, who owned land here in the mid-1800s, Saffold Dam is typical of many mill dams built during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Originally a natural rock outcropping, the dam was first improved by Henry Troell in the late 1800s when he added rock to the dam to raise the water level to power a cotton gin. The city of Seguin bought Troell's property in 1907 to further develop the river's hydroelectricity, and subsequent improvements have led to the establishment of a hydroelectric plant on the dam's south side. (1991) #4436

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Samuel Millett. Star and Wreath Samuel Millett; A Texas Soldier, 1835-1836; "He fought bravely in the Battle of San Jacinto." Erected by the State of Texas 1962 #4515

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Sebastopol. This Greek Revival house was built in 1854-56 by Joshua W. Young with unreinforced, load-bearing walls of cast-in-place limecrete, an early form of concrete made of lime, sand, and gravel. Joseph Zorn, Jr., mayor of Seguin from 1890 to 1910, bought the house in 1874 and it remained in his family until 1961. One of many concrete structures built in Seguin, this is an important surviving example of early concrete technology in the southwest. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1964 #4627

704 Zorn Street, Seguin, TX, United States

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St. Andrew's Episcopal Church. St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, 1876. Stephen White, architect. Original frame building lost bell tower in 1886 storm. Restored with Austin stone walls, 1954. Distinctive interior wood carvings, cathedral windows, Tiffany-type stained glass. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1965 #5026

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Redwood Cemetery. In 1885 German settlers in the community of Redwood founded a cemetery association. They purchased two acres of land located near Cottonwood Creek for a graveyard from A. H. and Sallie Fleming. A church and schools had been established nearby. The earliest marked grave is that of 15-year-old Lizzie Heidemeyer in August 1896. Among the nearly 70 burials are many of the founding members and their families. The site fell into disrepair but was cleaned and restored by descendants of the early immigrants. The volunteers also placed a gate with a sign and installed a flagpole. Incise at marker base: Donated by the heirs of founding association. #9429

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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El Capote Ranch. The founder of El Capote Ranch was Jose De La Baume (1731-1834), a French army officer who came to North America with the Marquis De Lafayette and fought in the American Revolution. He later joined the Spanish Army and for his services received title in 1806 to 27,000 acres of Texas land - the original El Capote Ranch. De La Baume's grant was reaffirmed after Mexico won independence from Spain in 1821. Virginia-born Michael Erskine (1794-1862) acquired the property in 1840. He raised cattle here and drove his herds to California and New Orleans. Since the San Antonio to Gonzales Road forded the Guadalupe River on El Capote land, many travelers passed this way. The Erskine family hosted several eminent visitors, including William Bollaert (1840), Ferdinand Roemer (1845-1847), and Frederick Law Olmstead (1857). After the Erskine family sold the ranch in the 1870s, part of the land was deeded to Edith Kermit Carow, the second wife of Theodore Roosevelt. During the Spanish-American War, Roosevelt rode an El Capote horse, "Seguin", at the Battle of San Juan Hill (1898). The ranch was acquired in 1897 by Judge Leroy Gilbert Denman (1855-1916), a Justice of the Texas Supreme Court, and is owned by his descendants. #1412

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Guadalupe County. Guadalupe County; formed from Gonzales and Bexar counties; created March 30, 1846. Organized July 13,1846; named for the Guadalupe River, to which this name was given by Alonso De Leon in 1689; Seguin, the county seat named in honor of Juan Nepomuceno Seguin 1806-1890. #2297

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Guadalupe County, C.S.A.. Star and Wreath Two local companies of volunteers were with Ben McCulloch in San Antonio, Feb. 16, 1861 when U.S. Arsenal was surrounded by Texans and surrender demanded. An encounter in a charged atmosphere which could have become the first armed conflict of Civil War but ended without a shot being fired and U.S. troops leaving state. County voted 314-22 for secession but "both sides" given in newspapers renamed to reflect views; "Mercury" became "The Southern Confederacy"; "Journal", "The Union Democrat". Camp Clark, 17 mi. NE, site of training for many of 350 men serving south. Co. D, 4th Tex. Inf. fought thru war in Hood's famed brigade. Plants made wagons, flour, tinware, ox yokes for army. Tannery made leather by exclusive process of Mesquite as tannin source. BACK: Gen. Ben McCulloch (1811-62) Gen. Henry E. McCulloch (1816-95) Tennessee gave Texas these illustrious brothers. Ben: fought in 1836 Battle of San Jacinto, was noted surveyor, lawman, Indian fighter; served General Zachary Taylor as scout in Mexican War; led state forces at San Antonio, Feb. 1861; as Brig. Gen., C.S.A. commanded troops in Arkansas, Indian Territory; in Wilson's Creek, Mo. victory 1861; killed at Battle Pea Ridge, Ark. Buried in State Cemetery in Austin. Henry: Texas lawman, Indian fighter, and legislator; Civil War service performed in Texas as Col., Brig. Gen. of state and Confederate forces protecting frontier against Indians, renegades, threat of Federal invasion from 1861-65. Out of state action in Vicksburg Campaign 1863. Buried in San Geronimo Cemetery in Seguin. Erected by the State of Texas 1963 #2298

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Guadalupe High School. Chartered Dec. 3, 1849; the 30 men in corporation each held $1,000 worth of stock. This was first Seguin school financed through public subscription. Plant was in use in 1850. Dr. Joseph E. Parks, nationally known chemist who had moved here from Kentucky, was in charge of the construction, which was mainly of patented parks concrete. This two-story building was used for many years by church groups, for worship services. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1962 #2299

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Henry Eustace McCulloch. In this lot lie Henry Eustace McCulloch; Texas Ranging Service 1839-42; Texas Ranger Captain, Mexican War, 1847-48; State Legislator, 1853-59; U.S. Marshal, 1859-61; Colonel, 1st Texas Regiment Mounted Rifles, C.S.A.; Brigadier General, C.S.A. District Commander, Texas Brigade Commander, Vicksburg Campaign. His wife, Jane Isabella Ashby McCulloch Erected by the State of Texas 1962 #2446

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Henry Troell. (October 5, 1938 - December 19, 1921) A native of Wichmannshausen, Germany, Henry Troell moved to this area sometime prior to 1860. He served in the Confederate Army and in 1872 married area native Johanna Woehler. A successful freighting business enabled him to invest in several local properties and enterprises, including an innovative dam/grist mill operation at this site. He expanded the mill's water and hydroelectric generation capabilities and in the 1890s provided the city its first water and electric utility systems. His entrepreneurial and business legacy represent an important part of the city's development. (1994) #2452

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Juan Nepomuceno Seguin. (1806-1890) Born in San Fernando de Bexar (San Antonio), son of Erasmo Seguin, whose ancestors came to America about 1700. Juan N. Seguin and his father in 1834 rallied fellow Texans against dictator Santa Anna. Young Juan Seguin raised Mexican-Texan troops, and fought in Siege of Bexar, 1835. He provided horses for soldiers of Col. W. B. Travis, further aiding as a courier during the Siege of the Alamo. Between fall of the Alamo and the Battle of San Jacinto, he led his Co. A, 2nd Regiment, Texas Cavalry, as rear guard for Gen. Sam Houston, protecting the civilians fleeing in front of army of Santa Anna. His men and Moseley Baker's troops held San Felipe, preventing Mexican Army from crossing the Brazos there. Then Seguin's unit joined Gen. Sam Houston's army and fought in the Battle of San Jacinto. In May 1836, Seguin gave military burial to the ashes of the heroes of the Alamo. From 1837 to 1840 he served the Republic of Texas as a Senator. Town of Walnut Springs, on the Guadalupe, changed its name, Feb. 25, 1839, to "Seguin", to honor this hero. Juan N. Seguin married Maria Gertrudis Flores. At his death he was buried in Nuevo Laredo, where his grave is cared for by citizens of City of Seguin. (1970) #2875

205 North River Street, Seguin, TX, United States

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Lone Oak Cemetery. On January 17, 1897, German immigrants living in the Geronimo area met at Specht School to discuss the need for a community cemetery. The group formed a "Friedhof Gesellschaft," or cemetery association, and within a week purchased a five-acre plot of land from Ernst Puls and designated it the Lone Oak Cemetery. The following year the first burial, that of the one-week-old, unnamed son of Ernst and Bertha Puls, took place. Since its founding, over 900 burials have taken place, and several older 19th century graves have been relocated here as well. (1992) Incise at bottom: In Memory of Kenneth Engler by George and Sylvia Engler #3115

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Andrew Neill Church House. Built 1854; of Parks Concrete, invented by Dr. Joseph E. Parks, nationally-known chemist who moved here from Kentucky. Although erected by Baptists, who organized their church, 1851, house was known as Neill's, as he donated the site. Mrs. Neill, a member of the Joseph E. Parks family, was a Baptist. Neill, a civic leader, was a Presbyterian. His denomination also met here. After its term as church, structure has had commercial and residential usage. #163

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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King Family Cemetery. Also known as King Ranger Cemetery, this burial ground is a link to the history of one of Seguin's earliest families. Three brothers, John Rhodes, Henry Basil and William George King were among the city's residents during the days of the Republic of Texas. Each served the community with distinction. John and Henry were the first of the King family to move to Texas from Tennessee. They arrived in Gonzales in October 1837 and then settled in what became Guadalupe County and helped found Seguin. In February 1841, their mother, Rachel Petty King Boyd, arrived with her second husband, John Boyd, and their brother, William George King. William G. King married Euphemia Texas Davis Ashby, and their six-month-old daughter, Mary Jane, who died in 1852, was the first to be buried here. Her parents and paternal grandmother are among the family members interred at what became the family cemetery. Texas Ranger and Mexican War veteran William G. King is one of several individuals buried here who served as Rangers. Historic Texas Cemetery - 2004 #13197

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Hollamon House-Erskine House. #15370

902 N. Austin St., Seguin, TX, United States

Battleground prairie historical marker
Battleground Prairie. Where 80 volunteers commanded by General Edward Burleson defeated Vicente Cordova and 75 Mexicans, Indians and Negroes, March 29, 1839, and drove them from Texas, ending the "Cordova Rebellion." 25 of the enemy were killed. Many volunteers were wounded, but none fatally. 1936 #336

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Wilson potteries historical marker
Wilson Potteries. Presbyterian minister John M. Wilson came to this area in 1856 with his family and slaves. Since earthen vessels were major 19th-century food storage items, Wilson established a pottery kiln in this vicinity in 1860. After Wilson sold his interest in the business in 1869, 3 of his former slaves began their own pottery shop. James, Hiram, and Wallace Wilson, who operated H. Wilson & Co. until 1884, created their own style of pottery and ran a successful business during the Reconstruction Era, when many newly-freed slaves found work only as sharecroppers. (1985) #5858

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Clear Spring Hall and Store. This area was settled by German immigrants in the 1840s and 1850s. Named for a water source later inundated by Lake Dunlap, the Clear Spring Community never evolved into a town, but remained a rural settlement. A store built at this site in the 1870s by Johann Andreas Breustedt became the commercial and social center for the surrounding area. A saloon and community hall were added to the building in later years, and the Clear Spring Gin Company located behind the store was important to the local cotton industry. 1989 #914

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Colonel John Ireland. Star and Wreath Delegate to Secession Convention 1861. Joined army as private. Won laurels in that most brilliant wartime effort - the defense of the 800-mile Texas Coast. In September, 1862, repulse of Federals at Corpus Christi, Ireland captured Fleet Captain Kittredge, his flag and arms. Though Ireland was an infantry officer he once plunged waist-deep to capture a Federal vessel off Padre Island. At war's end he was in command of the 8th Texas Regiment defending Galveston. BACK: Kentucky-born. Came to Texas 1853. Mayor of Seguin 1858. Member Consititutional Conventions 1866, 1875. District Judge 1866-67, removed by Reconstruction authorities. Legislator 1872-75. Called "Ox-cart John" for opposing land grants, subsidies to railroads. Supervised plans to oust Governor E. J. Davis in bloodless conflict marking political end of Texas' Reconstruction. Judge State Supreme Court 1875-76. Governor of Texas 1882-86. Fence-cutting wars, brought on when certain landowners began fencing the open range prompted him to call special Legislature which made fence-cutting a felony. He ruled that State Capitol be of Texas stone. Urged strict enforcement of criminal laws, economy in government, reducing public land sales. Term was marked by opening of University of Texas and first labor disturbances Texas had known. Buried State Cemetery, Austin. #962

?, Seguin, TX, United States

Subjects
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Former Site of Dowdy School. After the Wolters and Nixon School Districts merged in 1916, school trustees acquired two acres here from William Dowdy and erected the Wolters-Nixon School building. A gymnasium and classrooms were added in the early 1930s after an oil boom boosted the local economy. In 1932 the school was renamed Dowdy and offered high school classes for the first time. Despite a steady decline in student enrollment after 1938, the high school continued and students excelled in various team sports. Dowdy School was annexed to the Seguin School System in 1951. #1950

?, Seguin, TX, United States

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Moore House. John Moore (1866-1909), a native of Ireland, was an early Seguin newspaperman and civic leader. Through family ties, he was also a friend of Rough Rider and U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt. In 1895, a year after his marriage to Kate Peck (McClaugherty) (1871-1943), Moore constructed a three-room frame house at this site. In 1900 he commissioned John Goodrum to build the present Queen Anne residence, incorporating the earlier structure. The home was later occupied by Moore's descendants, including his son Roger (1902-1965), who served as mayor of Seguin for 22 years. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1981 #3458

703 Johnson Avenue, Seguin, TX, United States

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Site of Dietz Community. In 1851 Jamaica native Jacob De Cordova (1808-1868) settled here. He selected this spot for its beauty, rich soil and nearby springs. He built his first home, "Wanderer's Retreat". It served as a stage stop on the San Antonio Road and as a mail delivery station. De Cordova, acting as a land agent, sold over 90,000 acres of Texas land including this site. Nine German bachelors purchased the property and it became known as "Bachelor's Hall" and "Nine Men's House". Two brothers, Ferdinand Michael and J. August Dietz, cowboys for De Cordova, bought out the other men and the community became "Dietz". Johann Phillip Stautzenberger (1838-1904) bought the land in 1861, built a substantial house and general store, and became the first postmaster. Formal education began in a small room adjacent to Stautzenberger's store with Frankfort School starting later. "The Frohsinn Maennerchor", a singing group, was organized in the schoolhouse. Later they adopted the present name of "Frohsinn Mixed Chorus of Clear Springs". In 1895 a group of farmers founded present-day Friedens Church in the school building. Consolidation of the schools, closing of the post office, and good roads and automobiles caused this early community to disappear. 1978 #4768

?, Seguin, TX, United States