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United States

Wilkes-Barre, PA (unphotographed)

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Wyoming Division Canal. Built by the State of Pennsylvania, 1831-34, this canal opened the Wyoming Valley's anthracite field to the mid-Atlantic coal trade. Along with the railroads, it ultimately enabled this valley to become the world's largest anthracite coal producer. Part of the North Branch Canal, the line ran 17 miles from West Nanticoke to Pittston; a public boat basin was on this site. The Wyoming Division closed in 1882.

At Co. Courthouse, 200 N River St., near W Jackson St. intersection, Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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William G. McGowan (1927-1992). Founder of MCI Communications. MCI challenged AT&T's monopoly of the telephone industry and went on to become one of the nation's leaders in that field. McGowan was also a major financial contributor to many medical institutions and fields of research. He was a native of Ashley.

Public Sq., Market & Main Sts., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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William Camp Gildersleeve (1795-1871). Prominent merchant and ardent abolitionist significant to the Underground Railroad in Wilkes-Barre. He provided refuge to fugitive slaves at his home and business near here. In 1853, Gildersleeve testified in a U.S. Supreme Court case, Maxwell vs. Righter, in which a fugitive, William Thomas, was shot and wounded by deputy U.S. marshals. The case and his testimony received national attention, especially in African American newspapers.

20 E Ross St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Wilkes-Barre Fort. Completed 1778, enclosing the courthouse of the Connecticut county of Westmoreland. Surrendered with Forty Fort to the British in 1778.

W corner of public sq., Main & Market Sts., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Wilkes-Barre. Laid out 1770 by a group of Connecticut settlers, on land claimed by that state. Seat of "County of Westmoreland," erected 1776. Near here took place the Wyoming Massacre, 1778, and the "Pennamite Wars" of 1769-72 and 1784.

Kidder St. (Rt. 315) off Rt. 115/309, at Fairfield Inn, near Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Wilkes-Barre. Laid out 1770 by a group of Connecticut settlers, on land claimed by that state. Seat of "County of Westmoreland," erected 1776. Near here took place the Wyoming Massacre, 1778, and the "Pennamite Wars" of 1769-72 and 1784.

Market St. at Kirby Park, Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Wilkes-Barre. Laid out 1770 by a group of Connecticut settlers, on land claimed by that state. Seat of "County of Westmoreland," erected 1776. Near here took place the Wyoming Massacre, 1778, and the "Pennamite Wars" of 1769-72 and 1784.

Route 309 near Northampton Ave., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Teedyuscung (ca. 1700-1763). Called "King of the Delawares," he upheld the dignity of Native Americans and strove to protect their right to land in Pennsylvania. Baptized by the Moravians, he established the Wyoming Valley''s last Delaware & Mahican settlement near this site in 1754. A buffer between the Iroquois and Connecticut settlers, he represented his people in conferences at Easton, 1756-1762. He died when his cabin burned down here, April 19, 1763.

16 Riverside Dr. near Sheldon St., across from Wyoming Valley Sanitary Auth. #12, Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Sullivan Expedition Against the Iroquois Indians, 1779 - Fort Wyoming (PLAQUE). Mobilization camp of Sullivan's Army, June 23 - July 31, 1779.

River Commons, River St. near W. South St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Rev. Joseph Murgas. Pioneer in development of overland wireless telegraphy. In 1898 he began his experiments on these grounds. His first public transmission of sound was made here on Nov. 23, 1905. Pastor, artist, biologist, and a supporter of Slovak aspirations, he died 1929.

Sacred Heart Church, 601 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Rev. John J. Curran (1859-1936). Founding pastor of Holy Savior Parish in 1895. Known as the Labor Priest, he championed the workers' cause and was instrumental in settling the Anthracite Strike of 1902. He was a friend of Theodore Roosevelt, who visited here often.

Holy Savior Church, 43 Penn St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Min L. Matheson (1909-1992). Prominent labor, community, and civic leader. She headed the Wyoming Valley District of the ILGWU, 1944-1963. With her husband Bill, she confronted corrupting influences & other obstacles in building a membership of 11,000. Created under their leadership were a model workers' education program, health care center, and traveling chorus. Later, she led efforts on behalf of flood victims after Tropical Storm Agnes in 1992.

Public Sq. at Market & Main, Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Lyman H. Howe (1858-1923). From headquarters in Wilkes-Barre, Howe's six touring shows introduced motion pictures to rural Americans. Pioneer exhibitor of "high class" film programs with coordinated sound. Filmed world & local events, including Pres. Theodore Roosevelt's visit here in 1905.

S River Rd. & South St. , Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Luzerne County. Formed September 25, 1786 from Northumberland County. Named for Chevalier de la Luzerne. Wilkes-Barre, the county seat, was settled 1769. A center of the Yankee-Pennamite Wars (begun 1769) and 1902 Anthracite Strike, conflicts that changed America.

Courthouse, 200 N. River St., at North St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Jesse Fell (1751-1830). At his tavern here on Feb. 11, 1808, Fell burned "stone coal" successfully in an open grate. This famed experiment spurred the rise of the anthracite industry & the Wyoming Valley's growth. He was a judge, 1798-1830; first burgess of Wilkes-Barre, 1806.

Corner of E Northampton and S Washington Sts., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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George Catlin. The great painter of Indian portraits was born here July 26, 1796, of Connecticut ancestry. Until 1823 he practiced law here and nearby. He began painting Indian pictures six years later.

River & South Sts., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Fred Morgan Kirby (1861-1940). Pioneer of the 5 & 10 cent store sales concept. He opened his first store in Wilkes-Barre in 1884. In 1912, he merged his 96 retail stores with F. W. Woolworth to form the vast international retail chain. A philanthropist, he made significant gifts to institutions of higher education for the study of civil rights, and gifts for public health and recreation services in northeastern Pennsylvania. He resided here from 1905 to 1940.

202 South River St. (Kirby Hall), Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Franz Kline (1910-1962). This Abstract Expressionist painter, born in Wilkes-Barre, helped establish the international reputation of American artists in the 1950's. Kline's "Action Painting" is noted for bold, emotionally charged brushstrokes and non-representational subjects. The stark anthracite landscape of his native region inspired Kline's most famous work: his black and white paintings of the 1950s, including "Lehigh", "Luzerne", and "Pittston".

River Commons on River St., between South & Northampton Sts., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Fort Wyoming. Built by Pennsylvania, 1771; seized by Connecticut settlers. Rebuilt 1778. Mobilization camp for Sullivan's army, 1779. Destroyed 1784, after withdrawal of the Continental and Pennsylvania garrisons.

River St. near South St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Fort Durkee. First fort built by the Connecticut settlers; begun in April 1769. Used during the first Pennamite War against Pennsylvania authorities, 1769-71. It stood 1000 feet from Ft. Wyoming.

River St. near South St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Daniel J. Flood (1903-1994). US Congressman from Pa. 11th District, 1944 to 1980. His seniority on the House Appro-priations Committee and knowledge of the legislative process enabled him to play a key role establishing national programs such as Medicare, Appalachian urban economic development, and Coal Mine Health and Safety Act. He promoted the strength of US military forces and proliferation of nuclear arms during the Cold War. He resigned from Congress amid controversy.

Public Sq., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Connecticut Settlement. The first Connecticut settlement on their Susquehanna Purchase, 1762. Following its destruction by Indians on Oct. 15, 1763, no further settlements were made until 1769.

River Rd. (SR 2004) at city cemetery N of Wilkes-Barre, Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States
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Amedeo Obici (1877-1947). Founded Planters Peanut Company in 1906 with fellow Italian immigrant Mario Peruzzi. Arriving in America at twelve, speaking no English, Obici worked at a local fruit store before opening his own peanut cart. An entrepreneur, he invented new peanut production methods. Planters grew into one of the most widely distributed peanut brands; its Mr. Peanut trademark is universally recognized. Corporate headquarters was located here, 1925-1961.

632 S Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, United States

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