Hilaire Belloc
(1870-1953)

Died aged c. 83

Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc (/hɪˈlɛər ˈbɛlək/, French: [ilɛːʁ bɛlɔk]; 27 July 1870 – 16 July 1953) was a Franco-English writer and historian of the early twentieth century. Belloc was also an orator, poet, sailor, satirist, writer of letters, soldier, and political activist. His Catholic faith had a strong effect on his works. Belloc became a naturalised British subject in 1902 while retaining his French citizenship. He served as President of the Oxford Union and later MP for Salford South from 1906 to 1910. Belloc was a noted disputant, with a number of long-running feuds. Belloc's writings encompassed religious poetry and comic verse for children. His widely sold Cautionary Tales for Children included "Jim, who ran away from his nurse, and was eaten by a lion" and "Matilda, who told lies and was burned to death". He wrote historical biographies and numerous travel works, including The Path to Rome (1902). He also collaborated with G. K. Chesterton on a number of works.

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Commemorated on 3 plaques

Hilaire Belloc 1870-1953 poet, essayist and historian, lived here 1900-1905

104 Cheyne Walk, Kensington and Chelsea, SW10, London, United Kingdom where they lived (1900-1905)

Site of The Mont Blanc Restaurant where leading writers, including Belloc, Chesterton, Conrad and Galsworthy, met regularly in the early years of the 20th Century

15-16 Gerrard Street W1, London, United Kingdom where they met regularly

To Commemorate Hilaire Belloc 1870 - 1953 Writer, Poet & Walker "Lift up your hearts in Gumber"

?, Ides Common, United Kingdom where they was