Ray Bradbury
(1920-2012)

Died aged c. 92

Ray Douglas Bradbury (/ˈbrædˌbɛri/; August 22, 1920 – June 5, 2012) was an American author and screenwriter. One of the most celebrated 20th-century American writers, he worked in a variety of modes, including fantasy, science fiction, horror, mystery, and realistic fiction. Bradbury was mainly known for his novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953) and his short-story collections The Martian Chronicles (1950) and The Illustrated Man (1951). Most of his best known work is speculative fiction, but he also worked in other genres, such as the coming of age novel Dandelion Wine (1957) and the fictionalized memoir Green Shadows, White Whale (1992). He also wrote and consulted on screenplays and television scripts, including Moby Dick and It Came from Outer Space. Many of his works were adapted into television and film productions as well as comic books. The New York Times called Bradbury "the writer most responsible for bringing modern science fiction into the literary mainstream."

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Commemorated on 1 plaque

"Books were only one type of receptacle where we stored a lot of things we were afraid we might forget. There is nothing magical in them at all. The magic is only in what books say, how they stitched the patches of the universe together in on garment for us." Ray Badbury, Fahrenheit 451. In commemoration of author Ray Badbury writing Fahrenheit 451 in 1950 and 1953 at this site, the UCLA Library's former typewriter rental room.

UCLA, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, United States where they wrote Fahrenheit 451 (1950-1953)