Harold Ross
(1892-1951)

Died aged c. 59

Harold Wallace Ross (November 6, 1892 – December 6, 1951) was an American journalist who founded The New Yorker magazine and served as editor-in-chief of the publication from its inception until his death.

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Commemorated on 2 plaques

Brian Cooper on Flickr
Open Plaques on Flickr

Harold Ross 1892-1951 The magazine editor, who said "if you can't be funny, be interesting", lived here when he founded The New Yorker in 1925. At his 1923 "housewarming" were Dorothy Parker, Harpo Marx, and George Gershwin.

412 West 47th Street, NY 10036, New York, NY, United States where they lived

The Algonquin Hotel. Site of the legendary Algonquin Round Table of the 1920s, where such acid-tongued wits as Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and Alexander Woollcott traded barbs and bon mots daily over lunch. The century's literary luminaries -- William Faulkner, Sinclair Lewis, Harold Ross of The New Yorker, Gertrude Stein and James Thurber, among countless others -- also found a haven within its oak-lined walls.

The Algonquin Hotel, West 44th Street, New York, NY, United States where they found a haven