Henry Fielding
(1707-1754)

Died aged 47

Henry Fielding (22 April 1707 – 8 October 1754) was an English novelist and dramatist best known for his rich, earthy humour and satirical prowess, and as the author of the novel Tom Jones. Additionally, he holds a significant place in the history of law enforcement, having used his authority as a magistrate to found (with his half-brother John) what some have called London's first police force, the Bow Street Runners. His younger sister, Sarah, also became a successful writer.

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Commemorated on 4 plaques

Nick Harrison on Flickr
Spudgun67 on Wikimedia Commons
Spudgun67 on Wikimedia Commons
Brian Cooper on Flickr

Essex Street was laid out in the grounds of Essex House by Nicholas Barbon in 1675. Among many famous lawyers who lived here were Sir Orlando Bridgeman c.1606-1674 Lord Keeper, Henry Fielding 1707-1754 novelist and Brass Crosby 1725-1793 Lord Mayor of London. James Savage 1779-1852 architect had his office here. Prince Charles Edward Stuart stayed at a house in the street in 1750. Rev Theophilus Lindsey 1723-1808 Unitarian Minister founded Essex Street Chapel here in 1774. Dr. Samuel Johnson established an evening club at the Essex Head in 1783.

Essex Hall, Essex Street, Westminster, WC2, London, United Kingdom where they lived

Bow Street was formed about 1637. It has been the residence of many notable men, among whom were Henry Fielding (novelist), Sir John Fielding (magistrate), Grinling Gibbons (woodcarver), Charles Macklin (actor), John Radcliffe (physician), Charles Sackville Earl of Dorset (poet), William Wycherley (dramatist)

19-20 Bow Street, Westminster, WC2, London, United Kingdom where they lived

Henry Fielding 1707-1754 novelist lived here

Milbourne House, Barnes Green, Richmond Upon Thames, SW13, London, United Kingdom where they lived

Here lived Henry Fielding B.1707 D.1754 and Sarah Fielding B.1710 D.1768

Widcombe Lodge, Church Street, Bath, United Kingdom where they was