Jean-Paul Sartre
(1905-1980)

Died aged c. 75

Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (/ˈsɑːrtrə/; French: [saʁtʁ]; 21 June 1905 – 15 April 1980) was a French philosopher, playwright, novelist, political activist, biographer, and literary critic. He was one of the key figures in the philosophy of existentialism and phenomenology, and one of the leading figures in 20th-century French philosophy and Marxism. His work has also influenced sociology, critical theory, post-colonial theory, and literary studies, and continues to influence these disciplines. Sartre has also been noted for his open relationship with the prominent feminist theorist Simone de Beauvoir. Together, Sartre and de Beauvoir challenged the cultural and social assumptions and expectations of their upbringings, which they considered bourgeois, in both lifestyle and thought. The conflict between oppressive, spiritually destructive conformity (mauvaise foi, literally, "bad faith") and an "authentic" way of "being" became the dominant theme of Sartre's early work, a theme embodied in his principal philosophical work Being and Nothingness (L'Être et le Néant, 1943). Sartre's introduction to his philosophy is his work Existentialism and Humanism (L'existentialisme est un humanisme, 1946), originally presented as a lecture. He was awarded the 1964 Nobel Prize in Literature but refused it, saying that he always declined official honours and that "a writer should not allow himself to be turned into an institution".

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Commemorated on 1 plaque

Monceau on Flickr

Dans cet hôtel ont habité, entre 1937 et 1939, puis à diverses reprises durant la guerre, Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986) – Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980). Soucieux de préserver leur liberté mutuelle, ils occupaient à l'hôtel deux chambres séparées dominant le cimetière du Montparnasse où la mort les a réunis.

English translation: In this hotel lived, between 1937 and 1939, and on various occasions during the war, Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986) - Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980). In an effort to preserve their mutual freedom, they occupied two separate rooms in the hotel overlooking the cemetery of Montparnasse, where they were united by death. [AWS Translate]

Hôtel Mistral, 24 rue Cels, Paris, France where they lived