United States / Andrews, TX

all or unphotographed
"C" Ranch House. First privately owned land in Midland area, purchased in 1883 by Nelson Morris of Chicago. Then known as the Chicago Ranch, it had the first wire fence and windmill in West Texas and world's largest herd of Black Angus cattle. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1966 #3

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Andrews County. Created August 21, 1876, organized May 11, 1910. Named for Richard Andrews killed at the Battle of Concepcion, October 28, 1835, the first man to fall in the Texas revolution. County seat, Andrews. #167

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Billionth Barrel. On May 25, 1965, from one of 7,400 producing oil wells in the county's 196 fields, came the Billionth Barrel of Andrews County crude oil. In the 35 years and 5 months since oil flowed from the county's discovery well, C. E. Ogden No. 1, in Dec. 1929, Andrews has attained a new place in history. In 1929, the county had about 400 people. Its wealth, mostly in land and livestock, amounted to $8,109,399. Five persons in the county filed income tax returns. There were fewer than 100 children in school. Highway bonds in the amount of $200,000 were about to be issued, as a measure for county improvement. By 1956, Andrews County produced more than 60,000,000 barrels of oil annually--gaining recognition as number one in Texas and in the United States. Of great significance is the fact that presently proven reserves underlying the county total more than one billion barrels, without any consideration for additional recoveries by secondary methods. Andrews is more than a product of the billion barrels of crude of oil it has produced, more than the gasoline plants working through the night, more than modern highways, paved streets, homes, schools, dreams. Its destiny is great in human resources--and oil. (1965) #407

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Dorsie M. Pinnell. (June 25, 1875-July 23, 1939) Descendant of a Virginian who fought in the American Revolution. Came to Texas at 17 for health. Served (1898-1899) in Spanish-American War, Co. K, 1st Texas Inf. Vol. Regt. Later took up ranching in Andrews County. Married Jessie Whitten; had 4 sons. Recorded 1968. #1257

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Florey Park. Named for old town of Florey, established as a post office 7 miles to the northeast in 1909, prior to the organization of Andrews County, June 1910. In heart of the Means Oil Field, opened 1930, this park is at site of a 1934-1958 camp of Humble Oil and Refining Company. In the 24 years of the camp's history, its many residents developed an oasis here. The recreation area, with its lush grass and tall trees, attracted visitors from all parts of the county. On September 22, 1958, Humble Company donated the land to be used as a county park. (1965) #1923

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Irwin Ranch House. Only building remaining in old Shafter Lake, first settlement in Andrews County and at one time its largest town. Built 1908. Concrete blocks, hand pressed from sand of Shafter Lake, are the original frame. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1967 #2653

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Means Methodist Church. (First church in Andrews County). Organized in 1907 by circuit preacher F. T . Pollard and seven charter members. The group held services in local school until 1912, when a one-room church was built, financed by donations of members, including a generous gift from rancher J. S. Means. All denominations were allowed to worship in this early structure. In 1944 the church (located 2 blocks W, 4 blocks S. of here, on main St.) burned and members once again met in the school. Present building was finished in 1946; educational building in 1955; and the modern sanctuary, capable of seating 700, in 1957. (1968) #3311

311 NE 2nd Street, Andrews, TX, United States

Midland and Northwestern Railroad. Chartered Jan. 16, 1916, by Midland Farms Co., which was owned by David Fasken of Toronto, Canada. The 65 miles of road were completed from Midland to Seminole in 1918. Operated with an engine borrowed from Texas and Pacific Railway until 1920, when its operations ceased. Fasken purchased the C Ranch in 1912 from estate of Chicago meat packer Nelson Morris. Used part of land for track right-of-way. Developed railroad to ship cattle to markets and encourage settlement. Town of Fasken at peak had one-story depot, hotel, general store, two dwelling houses, schoolhouse and stock pens. The standard gauge line had one passenger coach, two flatcars, a mail and express car. Had trouble keeping on schedule because equipment was old and needed repairs constantly. Fireman and engineer shot coyotes en route to break monotony. In 1920, M.&N.W. went into receivership, and was sold to T.&P. after flash floods floated crossties away from roadbed. After approval by the Texas Railroad Commission, M.&N.W. was abandoned in 1923. Line was without prospects of increasing tonnage, was not prudently located, and would have lost money if operated. (1967) #3361

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Shafter Lake Cemetery. (1.5 miles West) Established just after turn of the century, on the south bank of Shafter Lake, and two miles south of the extinct settlement of Shafter Lake. Named for Colonel William R. Shafter (1835-1906), who led military expedition through region in 1875. It became the resting place for residents of remote ranches and travelers. Oldest legible gravestones are dated 1909; those of Joseph Snively and Mrs. Lucy Woolsey. Several remains have been removed by relatives; site now contains 12 known graves. The once neglected cemetery is cared for by Andrews County. (1973) #4652

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Shafter Lake Townsite. First town in yet-unorganized Andrews County. Platted 1908. Named for lake charted in 1875 survey of Col. Wm. R. Shafter, whose maps and victories over powerful Indians opened the Permian Basin to settlement. Water trough built by John Underwood of Shafter Lake Sand and Gravel is on site then set aside for a courthouse. It was stopping place for ranchers and freighters on way from Jal and Monument, N. Mex., into Texas. Town started to grow around trough. But when vote in 1910 county organization gave county seat to Andrews, town moved there. (1965) #4653

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Early Settlers of Andrews County. One of last frontiers of Texas. Anglo settlement here lagged 60 years behind rest of state due to Indians and scarcity of water. In 1886 O. B. Holt became first man to file for county land. First settlers included the Cowden brothers and Peter Von Holebeke. In 1900 county had 87 people; it was finally organized in 1910. With windmill pumps and drift fences, ranching became feasible, although soil was so dry that a grazing cow crashed through a dugout roof into a bed one day. In 1930 the discovery of oil brought wealth and rewarded the tenacity of first pioneers. (1970) #1350

700 W. Broadway (SH 176), Andrews, TX, United States

Andrews County (REPLACEMENT). #17076

?, Andrews, TX, United States

J. S. Means Ranch House. Built in 1900, this is one of the oldest houses in Andrews County. S. H. Purcell, his wife, and two relatives each filed on a section of public land, building this home where section-corners met, so that each individual could fulfill the legal requirement to live on his claim. Soon after proving their claims, they sold out to Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Means, who then (1904) owned 14 sections. Adding much more land, the Means family established a very successful working ranch. It continues to run cattle, even though the range has contained oil fields since the 1920s. (1974) #2683

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Whalen Lake School. One of the first schools in Andrews County, opened in 1907 near the north edge of Whalen Lake, on land donated by Mrs. M. B. Dillard. The one-room school, built by Joe and Jake Mathis, with materials purchased by Will Gates, served the children of homesteaders "proving up" their claims by living on the property 3 years. Teachers were Miss Grace Stanford, a Mr. Taylor, Miss Mary Lewis, and Earl Lontz, each remaining one year. The school closed in 1910, and the building was moved, as most of the settlers fulfilled their claim agreements and left. (1974) #5773

SH 176, 15 miles NW of Andrews, Andrews, TX, United States

Andrews County Discovery Well. C. E. Ogden No. 1, producing 200 barrels a day from San Andres lime formation was brought in, Dec. 1929, by Deep Rock Oil Co.--the Andrews County discovery well and first of 730 wells in Fuhrman-Masco oil field. Bought, Feb. 1932, by Tripplehorn brothers, of Fort Worth. Has now pumped for more than 35 years. Since 1956, Andrews has been top producing county in Texas and U. S. Fuhrman-Masco field has produced 55 million barrels of oil--its contribution to total of more than a billion barrels for Andrews County in May, 1965. (1965) #168

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Frankel City. In 1941 the Fullerton Oil Company of California struck oil near this site, and by 1945 more than 100 drilling rigs were in operation. The discovery brought great numbers of workers into the area, resulting in the establishment of the town of Fullerton. Located approximately one mile north, Fullerton provided newcomers with two churches, two cafes, two filling stations, a grocery store, delicatessen, beauty shop, and Andrews telephone exchange. Buses transported children to and from school in Andrews (16 miles SE). By the end of World War II, the boom town also boasted supply stores, oil field service companies, welding shops, and an electric plant. Fullerton's name was changed to Frankel City when the U.S. post office was established in 1948. At one time the post office served as many as 500 area families. By 1976, however, most of the oil had been taken from the ground, and workers in the field were laid off or transferred to other jobs. The town was abandoned as the post office and other businesses closed. The old Prairie Schooner Cafe, moved to this site from its original location, is all that is left of Frankel City. The ghost town, however, remains an important part of West Texas history. (1984) #2051

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Shafter's Trail. In 1875, Col. Wm. R. Shafter and a company of soldiers traveled from Fort Concho (where San Angelo is today) to Monument Springs, New Mexico, charting the arid plains, mapping all the vital watering places. This marker is in the only town of today through which Shafter's Trail passes. Here Col. Shafter, defending his party, chased Indians who ran 12 miles to the northwest. Thus he found the salt lake known ever after by his name. His expedition's maps of this formerly unknown land opened the Permian Basin to settlement. (1965) #4654

?, Andrews, TX, United States

Original Townsite of Andrews. Founded when Andrews County was organized in 1910, on land owned by Robert Madison Means (b. 1878). With his father, J. S. Means, "Bob" Means began homesteading here in 1899 and organized an abstract company in 1909. When Andrews battled Shafter City to acquire county seat, Means donated lots to local cowboys so they could vote; helped win election. Married Atwood Wilder, 1910; was county clerk, 1918-1922; civic leader throughout life. Town has grown through many gifts of real estate and funds from Means, who retired after finding oil on his land in 1934. (1970) #166

700 W. Broadway (SH 176), Andrews, TX, United States