United States / Claude, TX

all or unphotographed
Armstrong County. Created 1876. Name honors several Texas pioneers named Armstrong. Ranching became the chief industry when huge JA Ranch was established here in 1876. Farming was introduced after the railroad came through, 1887. County was organized in 1890. Present courthouse was built 1912. (1969) #202

?, Claude, TX, United States

Claude Monroe Ayers. Claude Monroe Ayers (1854-1915). Locomotive engineer piloting the first Fort Worth & Denver passenger train to reach here, 1887. Town was given his name. Recorded - 1971. #908

?, Claude, TX, United States

Charles H. Roan. (Aug. 16, 1923-Sept. 18, 1944). Winner, Congressional Medal of Honor for heroism during the Allied Forces' invasion of Peleliu in the western Pacific, in World War II. On July 21, 1945, he was decorated posthumously by presentation of his medal to his mother, Armstrong County Treasurer, Mrs. Lillabel Roan, in Claude. A Navy destroyer in 1946 was christened with his name. Private Roan's grave is in the Marine Cemetery, Peleliu Island. Recorded - 1970 #817

?, Claude, TX, United States

Charles Howard Roan. (August 16, 1923 - September 18, 1944) Claude native Charles H. Roan volunteered for World War II service in the U.S. Marine Corps in December 1942. On active duty in the Pacific, he was killed in battle on Peleliu Island when he threw himself on a Japanese grenade, thereby saving the lives of four fellow Marines. For his heroic action he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. The medal was presented to his mother, Armstrong County Treasurer Lillabel Roan, in ceremonies here at the courthouse in July 1945. A U.S. Navy destroyer built in 1946 was christened the USS Charles H. Roan DD-853. (1994) #818

?, Claude, TX, United States

Dr. and Mrs. Wm. A. Warner. Two of the most admired and beloved pioneer citizens of Armstrong County, Dr. Warner (1864-1934) was a country physician and his wife Phebe (Kerrick) (1866-1935) was an ardent humanitarian. Natives of Illinois, they were married in Claude in 1898. During his 35-year practice here, Dr. Warner made numerous calls by buggy and delivered over 2,000 babies, many in dug-outs. Affectionately called "The Little Brown Wren" for her busy, cheerful manner, Mrs. Warner originated women's clubs in the Panhandle and continually worked to improve rural life. (1969) #1284

?, Claude, TX, United States

Dugout of W. M. Dye. William Miles Dye was born in Kentucky in 1864 and moved to Texas with his parents in 1870. He settled in this area in 1891, one year after the organization of Armstrong County. By hauling rock from Palo Duro Canyon, Dye helped in the construction of the first county jail in Claude (13 mi. N). Still visible (10 yds. N) is the lower portion of the dugout he built for his family. Dugouts often were constructed in areas, such as the Texas Panhandle, where building materials were in short supply. (1983) #1295

?, Claude, TX, United States

First Baptist Church of Claude. Organized on May 18, 1890, by 19 charter members, with the Rev. B. E. Hure as moderator. The Rev. Count C. Storts was the first resident pastor. The congregation worshipped in the Presbyterian church building until 1899, when a frame sanctuary was built (1/2 block south) on property donated by L. P. Greer. A second structure, of brick, was erected on this site in 1918. The present facility was constructed and dedicated in 1971. In a pioneer environment, this church body served as an uplifting force to settlers of Claude and surrounding ranches and farms. #1622

300 Parks, Claude, TX, United States

Park Named for William A. Carroll, M.D.. (April 13, 1875-April 22, 1960) Born in Chester County, Tenn., son of Joseph Cyrus and Emily Kirk Carroll. Married Claudia Haltom, 1900. Graduated 1901 from University of Tennessee. Moved to Claude, 1914. In career of 54 years, delivered over 2500 babies. A staunch Democrat; a Mason and a Shriner; charter member, Claude Lions Club; director, First State Bank of Claude; president, Potter County Medical Association, he was honored, 1950, when city of Claude named this park for him. Dr. and Mrs. Carroll had four children: Kirk, Ralph, Perry, and Roberta. The son Ralph became a physician in Amarillo. (1973) #5816

?, Claude, TX, United States

S. P. Hamblen Family. Pioneered at this site, in dugout to the west. S.P. Hamblen (1846-1930) and wife Virginia Ann (1861-1950) settled in Lakeview area (9 mi. S of Claude) in 1889. Hamblen helped establish Lakeview School, 1890. He engaged in farming and stockraising, and also dealt in cedar posts cut in Palo Duro Canyon and sold in Amarillo at 3 cents each. Hauls over the old Indian trail were made with such great effort that W.H. Hamblen (oldest son, who helped his father) longed for good roads and later was designer of Hamblen Drive. Mrs. Hamblen, at home with her children, tended the ranch, courageously protecting family from the prevalent rattlesnakes, and repulsing vicious lobo wolves that attacked the young cattle. The Hamblens lived at this site, known as Mesquite Flat, in 1901-1902. The father and older sons, W.H., David and Claude, put up corrals and a barn, and then built the rockwalled 24 x 36-foot dugout. The tenth child of the family, Luther Ray Hamblen, was born in the Mesquite Flat dugout on March 3, 1902. Moving from this place, the Hamblens sought the best location for educating their children, who in the tradition of their parents became respected citizens of the west. (1970) #4401

?, Claude, TX, United States

Site of Warner Building. Erected at this site in 1909 by civic leaders Dr. William A. (1864-1934) and Phebe K. (1866-1935) Warner, the Warner Building played an important role in Claude's development. Designed by the Amarillo architectural firm of Heckman and Hartley, the building housed Dr. Warner's medical office, the Warners' Gate City Drugstore, public rest rooms, a barber shop, the "Claude News" newspaper office, a public reading room, a lodge hall, and rental office space. After a fire destroyed the building in 1915, the Warners reopened their drugstore at another location. #4911

101 N. Trice, Claude, TX, United States

Claude News. Established as the "Argus," Jan. 1, 1890, in the new railroad town of Claude. Later it merged with "Goodnight News" to become "Claude News." First publisher, W. S. Decker, sold paper to B. F. Hines, who sold to J. H. Hamner, in 1892. His daughter Laura V., later a foremost historian of the early great ranches of Texas Panhandle, edited the paper in this period. About 1913 Hamner sold to Spurgeon and Marvin Bishop. On Jan. 1, 1916, Thos. T. Waggoner, founder of 4 Oklahoma weeklies, bought the "News." After his death, his sons Wm. J. B. and Cecil acquired ownership, in 1950. (1969) #11

130 Trice Street, Claude, TX, United States

Armstrong County Jail. Erected in 1953, this building is constructed of stone used to build the first masonry jail in Armstrong County, 1894. Stone for the structure (which replaced a primitive, frame "calaboose") was quarried 14 miles south at Dripping Springs in Palo Duro Canyon and then hauled here in wagons driven by local citizens. The rock was cut at this site. The 1894 building had two stories, topped by a dome, and 20-inch walls. So sturdy was it that dangerous convicts from other counties were kept here. Old-timers remember that only three prisoners ever escaped. (1969) #203

?, Claude, TX, United States

Early Sheriffs of Armstrong County, 1890-1926. Inheriting peacekeeping duty from 1874-90 ranchers, the early sheriffs of Armstrong County (organized 1890) won great public regard. With their families, these men lived in jail quarters and fed the prisoners. There was no salary; fees were earned in civil and criminal process serving. Arrests were made for rustling and various other crimes. The earliest sheriffs were: John F. Wilson, 1890-92; Vince S. Terry, 1892-96; Pat H. Lynch, 1896-1904, 1919-24; Jeff D. Martin, 1904-06; W.A. (Bill) Davis, 1906-10; Ranzil C. Rodgers, 1910-14; James D. Woodburn, 1914-19, 1924-26. (1971) #1354

?, Claude, TX, United States

Great Panhandle Indian Scare of 1891. Although most Indians had left the Texas Panhandle by the 1880s, fear of Indian attacks was still prevalent among settlers who arrived in the next decade. On Jan. 29, 1891, rumors of approaching Indians spread throughout the entire region. For three days settlers barricaded their homes and communities and prepared to defend themselves. Later it was discovered that the rumored Indian war cries and smoke signals were actually cowboys in pursuit of a steer they finally caught and cooked over an open fire. (1983) #2263

?, Claude, TX, United States

Old Home Ranch. First ranch in the Panhandle, established in 1876 by Charles Goodnight (1836-1929). The original ranch headquarters, located on the south side of the Prairie Dog Town Fork of the Red River (7 miles SE), was built by Goodnight in the fall of 1876. In June 1877, Goodnight entered a partnership with Irishman John G. Adair and founded the "JA" Ranch. Adair died in 1885, and his wife, Cornelia Ritchie Adair, assumed the partnership with Goodnight until its dissolution in 1887. The Old Home Ranch headquarters burned in 1904. Edward Harrell purchased 35,000 acres of the "JA" in 1917, including the old ranch. (1970) #3749

?, Claude, TX, United States

Claude Cemetery. (Established 1890) Dan Cavanagh settled here in 1885 and bought this land in 1888. In 1890 he gave a grave site for railroad worker Neal DeBerry. Settler C.C. Bates was buried in 1890, and early burials from the Fort Worth & Denver Railroad right-of-way were later moved here. James and Harriet Grimes deeded the cemetery land to the public in 1905. A cemetery association was organized in 1912, and perpetual care began in 1936 with a $10,000 gift from Jim Hill. Also interred here are veterans of the Civil War, the Spanish American War, World Wars I and II, Korea, and Vietnam. (1973, 1990) #906

?, Claude, TX, United States

Boy Scout Troop No. 17. One of the oldest Scout troops west of the Mississippi River, this group was organized in May 1912 by pioneer physician Dr. W. A. Warner (1864-1934). The first troop of about 30 boys met in a room above Dr. Warner's drugstore and office. Because of his foresight, many of Claude's civic leaders were influenced in their youth by ideals of scouting. Dr. Warner served as the first scoutmaster, followed by John W. McClure, Bert C. Wooldridge, Cecil Waggoner, and J.L. McFarland. Troop No. 17, also called the "Lone Star Pioneers," is governed by the Scouts through their Junior Council. (1975) #478

?, Claude, TX, United States

Route of Coronado Expedition. Led by Francisco Vazquez de Coronado, this trail-blazing expedition set out from Mexico City in 1541 in search of Cibola, fabled 7 Cities of Gold. Finding only Indian pueblos, Coronado changed his course for Quivira, a supposedly wealthy Indian kingdom. This quest brought the entourage across the Panhandle plains to present Tule Canyon. Then with 30 men, Coronado went north by "Needle Point" -- a route taking in Palo Duro Canyon and present Armstrong County, via Claude. He next continued into Kansas, but failing to find riches, returned to Mexico in 1542. (1969) #4366

?, Claude, TX, United States

Town of Claude. Founded when Fort Worth & Denver Railroad built into area (1887). Claude Ayers, engineer on first passenger train through here, suggested town be named for him -- and citizens agreed. Jerry Cavanaugh, first resident, gave land for town. Post office was granted in 1888, with E.H. Trice, postmaster. Claude won a close race for county seat, 1890. Tie-breaking vote was cast by famous rancher Chas. Goodnight. Churches were established in 1890 and a school built in 1891. Noted Panhandle historian Laura V. Hamner was an early teacher. Town was incorporated in 1909. (1971) #5524

?, Claude, TX, United States

Warner Memorial Community Center. Frame structure, built about 1912 as Llano School (15 mi. SW of Claude), was vacated in 1930, used as rural community center, then moved 1939 to this site donated by Mr. and Mrs. J.T. Christian. Volunteers applied stucco and remodeled interior, using funds raised by the Armstrong County Federation of Women's Clubs. The center name honors Dr. and Mrs. Wm. A. Warner, pioneer leaders in social progress and culture. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1962 #5720

400 Vine Street, Claude, TX, United States