United States / Gail, TX

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1902-1904 Land Rushes. Cowboys and settlers fought here in early days for right to claim lands placed in public domain in 1902 by Texas courts. To keep land they were using, ranchers sent their men, wearing blue ribbon armbands, to file claims at office of county clerk. Nesters, with red ribbons, rushed for same land. To avoid bloodshed, Sheriff W. K. Clark disarmed the men. For 3 days prior to deadlines, the cowboys and nesters had knockdown, dragout fights at the filing window. Later, nesters starved out, because of drouths; land they took up reverted to grazing. (1970) #27

?, Gail, TX, United States

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Borden County. Originally a part of Bexar District; created August 21, 1876; organized March 17, 1891. Named in honor of Gail Borden, 1801-1874, pioneer surveyor, newspaper editor, and inventor of the process of condensing milk; Gail, county seat. #456

?, Gail, TX, United States

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Borden County Jail. Built of hand-hewn native stone from Gail Mountain, this jail planned for maximum security. Is one of the oldest jails in use in West Texas. Diebold Safe and Lock Co. was awarded the $4,500 contract in 1896. Behind two-foot thick outside walls, the cell walls and floor are of 1/3 inch case hardened steel plates, impervious to hack saw blades. Doors fastened with huge hasps and padlocks opened by six-inch key. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1967. #457

?, Gail, TX, United States

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Gail Cemetery. Borden County, created in 1876, was organized in 1891, the same year the town of Gail was established as county seat. The next year, J.I. and L.E. Wilborn gave land for the courthouse sqaure and three churches, and dedicated Block 18 of the townsite for a burial ground. The cemetery had been used as early as March 1891 for the burial of Fetnah Alexander. At least nine unmarked graves exist, some of which may be earlier. In January 1901, J.I. Wilborn officially deeded the tract to trustees for the county-operated cemetery. Buried here are many county officials, including Sid Reeder and his wife, Iva, who both served as county sheriff. Others interred here include veterans of military conflicts dating to the Civil War, three of the original cemetery trustees, and John Henry Smoot, a stonemason who built the foundation and vault for the courthouse, and carved many of the cemetery's early grave markers. The Borden County Cemetery Association and Commissioners Court maintain the burial ground, and family members and others donate time and funds to preserve this tie to their local and family history. Historic Texas Cemetery - 2003 #13798

732 E. Kincaid, Gail, TX, United States