United States / Stinnett, TX

all or unphotographed
Texas historical marker for drift fence
Drift Fence. Famed cattleman Charles Goodnight established one of the first ranches in the Texas Panhandle, the J A Ranch, in 1876. Later that year, Thomas S. Bugbee established the first cattle ranch in Hutchinson County. As a result of soaring beef prices cattle ranching proliferated in this region of the U.S. in the 1880s. The Texas Panhandle, with its open range and expansive grasslands, became the preferred winter grazing site for cattle migrating south from Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Kansas. This seasonal influx of cattle disrupted the practice of area ranchers who went to great lengths to respect adjacent ranch boundaries. Members of the Panhandle Stock Association pooled their resources and in 1882-85 erected barbed wire barriers along a 200-mile stretch of the Panhandle including Hutchinson County to prevent cattle from drifting south into the fertile Canadian River Valley. The "drift fence" worked too well in the winters of 1886 and 1887 when thousands of cattle moving south ahead of strong storms stalled at the fence line and froze or were trampled to death. The staggering losses prompted federal and state legislation which limited fencing on public lands and the "drift fence" was removed or incorporated into private ranch fencing. Sesquicentennial of Texas Statehood 1845-1995. #1286

?, Stinnett, TX, United States

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Battle of Adobe Walls. Was fought here November 25, 1864, when Colonel Christopher (Kit) Carson (1809-1868) with a few companies of United States troops under the protection of the Adobe Walls attacked a band of hostile Kiowa and Commanche Indians and killed over 60 braves. This was "Kit" Carson's last fight. (1936) #320

?, Stinnett, TX, United States

First battle of adobe walls
First Battle of Adobe Walls. Largest Indian battle in Civil War. 15 miles east, at ruins of Bent's Old Fort, on the Canadian. 3,000 Comanches and Kiowas, allies of the South, met 372 Federals under Colonel Kit Carson, famous scout and mountain man. Though Carson made a brilliant defense - called greatest fight of his career - the Indian won. Some of the same Indians lost in 1874 Battle of Adobe Walls, though they outnumbered 700 to 29 the buffalo hunters whose victory helped open the Panhandle to settlement. (1964) #1690

?, Stinnett, TX, United States

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Holt School. A county-wide public school district was established soon after Hutchinson County was created in 1901. As more people began to settle in the area, regional school districts were formed. Common School District No. 8 was established in the northeastern corner of the county in 1902. The first schoolhouse, located on land owned by Benjamin Calvin Holt, was a one-room structure built in 1903. This two-room schoolhouse was constructed in 1916 with lumber and other building materials hauled in from Texoma, Oklahoma. The simple wooden structure exhibits classical revival style detailings, especially in the gable entrance. Other features include oversized windows and decorative wood shingles. Regular school classes were held here until 1935, when students began attending school in Spearman. The building, however, remained a community gathering place. The site of worship services, weddings and funerals, it has also hosted community activities such as quilting bees and local theater productions and continues to serve as an election polling place. The school buildings and grounds were deeded to the Holt Cemetery Association in 1949. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1989. #2515

?, Stinnett, TX, United States

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Hutchinson County Courthouse. Hutchinson County, named for prominent judge and writer Anderson Hutchinson, was one of 54 counties created out of the District of Bexar in 1876 by the Texas Legislature. It was not until 1901, however, that the county was officially organized. That year a temporary county courthouse was erected in the county seat of Plemons. A permanent courthouse was built in Plemons by contractor E. E. Ackers. Stinnett replaced Plemons as Hutchinson County Seat in 1926. The county courthouse was temporarily housed in an office building in downtown Stinnett in 1926 before this courthouse was erected in 1927 at a time of major oil discoveries in the area. Designed by Amarillo architect W. C. Townes and built by local contractor C. S. Lambie & Company, the Spanish renaissance revival style building also housed the county jail. It features brick construction with cut-stone ornamentation, a 3-bay primary facade with grand entry bay, raised basement with end entries, metal sash windows and second floor window with round-arch stone lintels. Friezes at the east and west entrances of the courthouse depict the petroleum, farm and ranch, and cattle industries, historically the three principal commercial enterprises in the area. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1962. #2602

Located 5th and Main Streets, Stinnett, TX, United States

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Drift Fence. #14964

?, Stinnett, TX, United States

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Isaac McCormick Cottage, "Birthplace of Hutchinson County". Built 1899 with materials hauled at great peril across the Canadian - then without a bridge. Mr. McCormick, his wife, Capitola, and eight children lived in a covered wagon and a tent while they put up their house. Home became cradle of county government when it was site of first meeting to plan separate organization of Hutchinson County (which previously had been joined to Roberts County for judicial purposes). In 1901 it was one of polling places in first county election. Moved to town, 1928; donated by Edgar Britain, 1964, for museum. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1967. #2

?, Stinnett, TX, United States

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Holt Cemetery. In the late 1890s Texas enacted colonization and homestead laws that significantly quickened the settlement of the then sparsely populated Panhandle region of North Texas. Hutchinson County soon recorded the required 150 applications for land purchases in the county to formally organize in 1901. In 1903 early county settlers Benjamin and Birda May (Kirk) Holt donated seven acres here to be used as the site of a community schoolhouse and cemetery. The first person buried here was Nola Storrs in 1909. A new schoolhouse was built here in 1916 and in 1917 the Holts legally recorded their 7-acre donation. Five acres were set aside for school purposes and two acres for the cemetery, which at that time contained about 11 gravesites. When Holt School trustees deeded the school's five acres and vacated schoolhouse to the Holt Cemetery Association in 1948, about an acre of this property was converted for cemetery use. In 1907 the cemetery association established policies governing the use of this site. The cemetery, which continues to serve the local community, contains the gravesites of many of this area's first settlers and those of veterans of World War I, World War II, and the Korean conflict. (1993) #2514

?, Stinnett, TX, United States