King James II of England
(1633-1701)

King of Scots (1685-1688) and King of England (1685-1688)

Died aged 67

James II and VII (14 October 1633O.S. – 16 September 1701) was King of England and Ireland as James II and King of Scotland as James VII, from 6 February 1685 until he was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688. He was the last Roman Catholic monarch to reign over the Kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland. The second surviving son of Charles I, he ascended the throne upon the death of his brother, Charles II. Members of Britain's Protestant political elite increasingly suspected him of being pro-French and pro-Catholic and of having designs on becoming an absolute monarch. When he produced a Catholic heir, leading nobles called on his Protestant son-in-law and nephew William of Orange to land an invasion army from the Netherlands, which he did in the Glorious Revolution of 1688. James fled England (and thus was held to have abdicated). He was replaced by his eldest, Protestant daughter Mary and her husband William of Orange. James made one serious attempt to recover his crowns from William and Mary when he landed in Ireland in 1689. After the defeat of the Jacobite forces by the Williamites at the Battle of the Boyne in July 1690, James returned to France. He lived out the rest of his life as a pretender at a court sponsored by his cousin and ally, King Louis XIV. James is best known for his struggles with the English Parliament and his attempts to create religious liberty for English Roman Catholics and Protestant nonconformists, against the wishes of the Anglican establishment. However, he also continued the persecution of the Presbyterian Covenanters in Scotland. Parliament, opposed to the growth of absolutism that was occurring in other European countries, as well as to the loss of legal supremacy of the Church of England, saw their opposition as a way to preserve what they regarded as traditional English liberties. This tension made James's four-year reign a struggle for supremacy between the English Parliament and the Crown, resulting in his deposition, the passage of the Bill of Rights, and the accession of his daughter and her husband as king and queen.

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Family tree

Commemorated on 9 plaques

David Anstiss on Geograph
David Anstiss on Geograph
Jez Nicholson on Flickr
Nick Harrison on Flickr
Simon Harriyott on Flickr
Marvin Barretto on Flickr
flipflopnick on Flickr
Monceau on Flickr
Monceau on Flickr

Here lived Henry Hatch, merchant, adventurer and benefactor of the town. Died 1533. To this house was brought King James II when captured in attempting to leave the kingdom, December, 1688.

12 Market Place, Faversham, United Kingdom where they was brought

After being captured by Faversham fishermen in December 1688 while trying to escape to the continent, King James II was detained for 3 days in this house, then the home of the Mayor, Thomas Southouse, and later that of Richard Marsh, owner of this brewery in 1698.

Quay Lane, Faversham, United Kingdom where they was detained

This house was the residence of the Duke of York (afterwards James II) occasionally during the Dutch War 1665 to 1672

58 High Street, Southwold, United Kingdom where they lived

On part of this site in 1640 was built Worcester House where lived Edward second Marquess of Worcester. At midnight on the 3rd. September, 1660, Anne Hyde daughter of the Earl of Clarendon was secretly married here to the Duke of York (afterwards James II) whose two daughters, Mary and Anne, became Queens of England.

Savoy Court, London, United Kingdom where they was secretly married here to Anne Hyde (1660)

King James II of England and VII of Scotland stayed at this house as the guest of Sir Richard Head before embarking for France on the 25th December 1688 when he finally left England.

Abdication House, High St, Rochester, United Kingdom where they stayed

Site of The Greyhound Inn Where in July 1647 King Charles I met his children James, Duke of York, Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Princess Elizabeth. This was arranged by the Parliamentary leader, Sir Thomas Fairfax. The local people decked the King's route with green boughs and strewed it with flowers.

66 High Street, Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 1PY, Maidenhead, United Kingdom where they was

A 16th century house, later an inn, the accession of James 2 was celebrated here by local magistrates and there is a tradition that Oliver Cromwell was entertained here in 1648.

30 The Bank, Barnard Castle, United Kingdom where they is commemorated

En cette Eglise la Chapelle funéraire à la Mémoire de Jacques II, dernier Roi d'Angleterre de la Maison des Stuarts, mort en exil au Chateau de St. Germain-en-Laye le 16 septembre 1701. Monument élevé par S.M. la Reine Victoria. ---------- In this Church is the Shrine to the Memory of James II, the last Stuart King of England, who died in exile at the Castle of St. Germain-en-Laye on September 16th, 1701. The Monument was erected by Her Majesty Queen Victoria.

English translation: In this Church is the Shrine to the Memory of James II, the last Stuart King of England, who died in exile at the Castle of St. Germain-en-Laye on September 16th, 1701. The Monument was erected by Her Majesty Queen Victoria.

rue de la Paroisse, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France where they was buried (1701)

Ci-gît le Roi Jacques VII d'Ecosse, II d'Angleterre, 1633 - 1701. Partenaire fidèle de la Vielle Alliance Franco-Ecossaise. ---------- Here lies King James VII of Scotland, II of England, 1633 - 1701. Loyal partner in the Franco Scottish Auld Alliance.

English translation: Here lies King James VII of Scotland, II of England, 1633 - 1701. Loyal partner in the Franco Scottish Auld Alliance.

Rue de la Paroisse, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France where they was buried (1701)