Thomas Jefferson
(1743-1826)

Died aged c. 83

Thomas Jefferson (April 13 [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776). He was elected the second Vice President of the United States (1797–1801), serving under John Adams and was elected the third President (1801–09) in 1800. Jefferson was a proponent of democracy, republicanism, and individual rights, which motivated American colonists to break from Great Britain and form a new nation. He produced formative documents and decisions at both the state and national level. Jefferson was primarily of English ancestry, born and educated in Virginia. He graduated from the College of William & Mary and briefly practiced law, at times defending slaves seeking their freedom. During the American Revolution, he represented Virginia in the Continental Congress that adopted the Declaration, drafted the law for religious freedom as a Virginia legislator, and served as a wartime governor (1779–1781). He became the United States Minister to France in May 1785, and subsequently the nation's first Secretary of State in 1790–1793 under President George Washington. Jefferson and James Madison organized the Democratic-Republican Party to oppose the Federalist Party during the formation of the First Party System. With Madison, he anonymously wrote the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions in 1798–1799, which sought to embolden states' rights in opposition to the national government by nullifying the Alien and Sedition Acts. As President, Jefferson pursued the nation's shipping and trade interests against Barbary pirates and aggressive British trade policies. He also organized the Louisiana Purchase, almost doubling the country's territory. As a result of peace negotiations with France, his administration reduced military forces. He was reelected in 1804. Jefferson's second term was beset with difficulties at home, including the trial of former Vice President Aaron Burr. American foreign trade was diminished when Jefferson implemented the Embargo Act of 1807, responding to British threats to U.S. shipping. In 1803, Jefferson began a controversial process of Indian tribe removal to the newly organized Louisiana Territory, and he signed the Act Prohibiting Importation of Slaves in 1807. Jefferson mastered many disciplines, which ranged from surveying and mathematics to horticulture and mechanics. He was a proven architect in the classical tradition. Jefferson's keen interest in religion and philosophy earned him the presidency of the American Philosophical Society. He shunned organized religion, but was influenced by both Christianity and deism. He was well versed in linguistics and spoke several languages. He founded the University of Virginia after retiring from public office. He was a prolific letter writer and corresponded with many prominent and important people throughout his adult life. His only full-length book is Notes on the State of Virginia (1785), considered the most important American book published before 1800. Jefferson owned several plantations which were worked by hundreds of slaves. Most historians now believe that, after the death of his wife in 1782, he had a relationship with his slave Sally Hemings and fathered at least one of her children. Historians have lauded Jefferson's public life, noting his primary authorship of the Declaration of Independence during the Revolutionary War, his advocacy of religious freedom and tolerance in Virginia, and the Louisiana Purchase while he was president. Various modern scholars are more critical of Jefferson's private life, pointing out the discrepancy between his ownership of slaves and his liberal political principles, for example. Presidential scholars consistently rank Jefferson among the greatest presidents.

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Commemorated on 8 plaques

En ce lieu resida Thomas Jefferson Ministre des Etats-Unis en France 1785 - 1789 Président des Etats-Unis 1801-1809 Auteur de la Déclaration de l'Indépendance américaine Fondateur de l'Université de Virginie Cette plaque a été apposée le 13 Avril 1919 par les soins des anciens éléves de l'Université de Virginie soldats de la Guerre mondiale en commémoration du centenaire anniversaire de la fondation de l'Université

In this place resida Thomas Jefferson Minister of the United States in France 1785 - 1789 President of the United States 1801-1809 Author of the Declaration of American Independence Founder of the University of Virginia This plaque was affixed on April 13, 1919 by the care of the former elevators of the University of Virginia soldiers of the World War in commemoration of the centenary anniversary of the founding of the University [AWS Translate]

92 Avenue des Champs-Elysées, Paris, France where he lived (1784-1788)

Texas Historical Marker #5470

Thomas Jefferson High School. Fall of 1930 to help ease the crowded conditions in San Antonio's two existing High Schools. Despite public protest at the expense involved, the project was completed in January 1932. Designed by the San Antonio architectural firm of Adams and Adams, Thomas Jefferson High School is built around two large patios with a tower and sub-tower. It features an elaborate Baroque entry, a Red Spanish tile roof, wrought iron balconies, and the school's coat of arms cast in stone on the four sides of the tower dome. It was the first San Antonio High School to have tile floors and the first to have its own Gymnasium. Thomas Jefferson High School, whose name was chosen by the students, opened its doors on Feb. 1, 1932, and had an initial enrollment of 1400. Over the years, both the school building and the student body have received national and international recognition in newspapers, magazines, and films. The school has produced numerous outstanding Alumni in the fields of Government, the military, communications, education, athletics, the medical and legal professions, business, and fine arts. #5470

723 Donaldson Ave., San Antonio, TX, United States where he is commemorated

Texas Historical Marker #6670

Dallas Hall (SMU). DALLAS HALL, SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY When Dallas was selected in 1911 as the site for a new Methodist university, local citizens pledged 622.5 acres of land and $300,000. In appreciation, the first building on campus was named Dallas Hall. SMU President Robert S. Hyer chose the Chicago Branch of Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge to design the Hall. Influenced by Thomas Jefferson's plan for the University of Virginia, it opened in 1915 and for a decade housed all classrooms, university offices, the chapel and the library. RTHL - 1979 #6670

?, Dallas, TX, United States where he inspired

Texas Historical Marker #8054

Jefferson. Founded 1836. Named for President Thomas Jefferson. Chief river port of Texas, 1846-1870. This prosperous ante-bellum city became a Confederate Quartermaster Depot; produced boots, shoes, iron goods, preserved meats for army. Nearby oil field discovered in 1939. Many fine old homes and other landmarks. #8054

?, Jefferson, TX, United States where he is commemorated

Jefferson County. Formed March 26, 1804 out of Lycoming County and named for President Thomas Jefferson. Until 1806 attached to Westmoreland County, then to Indiana County until 1830. Noted for its coal and lumber industries. Brookville, county seat, was incorporated 1834.

County Courthouse, Main St. (Rt. 28) at Pickering, Brookville, PA, United States where he is commemorated

On 8th April 1786 John Adams and Thomas Jefferson - the second and third Presidents of the United States of America - dined in the old Hop Pole Inn, which is the building to the left of this hotel, during their 8-day tour of English gardens and Civil War battle sites. Later, on Fort Royal Hill, Adams demanded of local people: "do Englishmen so soon forget the ground where liberty was fought for? All England should come in pilgrimage to this hill once a year."

Whitehouse Hotel, Worcester, United Kingdom where he dined (1786)

Thomas Jefferson 13 Avril 1743 A Shadwell en Virginie 4 Juillet 1826 A Monticello en Virginie Symbole de l'amitie Franco-Americaine Ambassadeur de Etats - Unis en France 1785 - 1789 3eme Président des Etats - Unis 1801 - 1809 Auteur principal de la Rédaction de l'Indépendance Américaine 4 Juillet 1776. Amoureux de la France, il voyage, parcourt nos territoires et promeut aux Etats - Unis notre patrimoine - Architecture, terroirs, culture, humaniste, il partage nos valeurs de liberté. Avec son ami La Fayette, il joue un role cle dans l'ébauche de la Constitution Francaise et de la Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du Citoyen en 1789. 1789 - 2009 Un pont pour la Liberté 220eme Anniversaire de la Révolution Francaise Les Ponts du Coeur

Thomas Jefferson 13 April 1743 In Shadwell, Virginia 4 July 1826 In Monticello, Virginia Symbol of the Franco-American Friendship Ambassador of France to France 1785 - 1789 3rd President of the United States 1801 - 1809 Main author of the Writing of American Independence 4 July 1776. In love with France, he travels, travels through our territories and promotes our heritage in the United States - Architecture, Terroirs, culture, humanist, he shares our values of freedom. He and his friend La Fayette played a key role in the drafting of the French Constitution and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen in 1789. 1789 - 2009 A Bridge for Freedom 220th Anniversary of the French Revolution The Ponts du Coeur

Place du Palais Charles de Gaulle, Vienne, France where he was

Thomas Jefferson 13 Avril 1743 A Shadwell en Virginie 4 Juillet 1826 A Monticello en Virginie Symbole de l'amitie Franco-Americaine Ambassadeur de Etats - Unis en France 1785 - 1789 3eme Président des Etats - Unis 1801 - 1809 Auteur principal de la Rédaction de l'Indépendance Américaine 4 Juillet 1776. Amoureux de la France, il voyage, parcourt nos territoires et promeut aux Etats - Unis notre patrimoine - Architecture, terroirs, culture, humaniste, il partage nos valeurs de liberté. Avec son ami La Fayette, il joue un role cle dans l'ébauche de la Constitution Francaise et de la Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du Citoyen en 1789. 1789 - 2009 Un pont pour la Liberté 220eme Anniversaire de la Révolution Francaise Les Ponts du Coeur

Thomas Jefferson 13 April 1743 In Shadwell, Virginia 4 July 1826 In Monticello, Virginia Symbol of the Franco-American Friendship Ambassador of France to France 1785 - 1789 3rd President of the United States 1801 - 1809 Main author of the Writing of American Independence 4 July 1776. In love with France, he travels, travels through our territories and promotes our heritage in the United States - Architecture, Terroirs, culture, humanist, he shares our values of freedom. He and his friend La Fayette played a key role in the drafting of the French Constitution and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen in 1789. 1789 - 2009 A Bridge for Freedom 220th Anniversary of the French Revolution The Ponts du Coeur

Porte Guillaume - Place Darcy, Dijon, France where he was