United States / Montague, TX

all or unphotographed
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1927 Montague County Jail. The third structure to serve as Montague County Jail, this building was erected by the Southern Prison Company of San Antonio in 1927. The first floor contained living quarters for the jailer and his family, and six prison cells were maintained on the second floor. Used as a jail until a new facility was built in 1980, the building's architectural features include its entry portico, stone cornice, cast stone window sills, and simple tile detailing. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1991. #33

Courthouse square, Montague, TX, United States

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Fruitland Schools. A bronze medallion commemorating the rural schools of Montague County was placed at the site of one of the old schools in each precinct of the County. They designed exactly as shown on sketch but somewhat larger with the date of beginning and ending of particular school. Each medallion was imbedded in concrete marker about 3 ft. above ground. Please return sketch. Will furnish picture at later date. Glenn O. Wilson. #2074

Not Located, Montague, TX, United States

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Montague Cemetery. The first known settlers in Montague County arrived in 1849. After the county was formed in 1857, the City of Montague was created a year later to serve as county seat. The town grew slowly at first, but by 1871 was developing rapidly and experiencing an influx of new settlers. James M. Gibbons, one of the early pioneers, came to this area from Tennessee. Family history indicates that Gibbons donated the first plot of land in this cemetery for the burial of his wife, Elizabeth Lankford Gibbons, upon her death in 1862. He later married Nancy Elizabeth Furr, who also is buried here. Gibbons died in 1899 and is interred in the cemetery, as are several other family members and numerous other early settlers. The Montague Cemetery contains both unmarked and marked graves. About 60 of the legible tombstones bear dates from the 1800s. Several Confederate veterans and a few early Texas Rangers also are buried here. With ties to the early settlement of Montague, this graveyard is an important part of the area's history. Care for the burial sites is provided by the Montague Cemetery Association. (1985) #3436

SH 175, N side of Montague, Montague, TX, United States

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Montague Pioneer Memorial. #3439

Courthouse square, Montague, TX, United States

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United Methodist Church of Montague. In 1872 The Rev. John F. Denton, a Methodist missionary, preached in Montague. The next year four members under the leadership of The Rev. Joseph Clinton Weaver (1846-1924) began this fellowship. W.T. and E.A. Waybourn deeded two acres in 1878 on the Old Nocona-Montague Public Road. A parsonage was built and a meetinghouse erected directly across the road. In 1881 the sanctuary was moved to this site deeded by John Speer and J.D. Hagler. The building was restored after the 1905 tornado caused extensive damage. An annex was added in 1953. (1979) #5604

SH 59 (Rusk Street) S. of Courthouse, Montague, TX, United States

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Rural Schools-Dye Mound. #14157

?, Montague, TX, United States