Emmeline Pankhurst
(1858-1928)

Died aged 69

Emmeline Pankhurst (née Goulden; 15 July 1858 – 14 June 1928) was an English political activist. She is best remembered for organising the UK suffragette movement and helping women win the right to vote. In 1999, Time named her as one of the 100 Most Important People of the 20th Century, stating that "she shaped an idea of objects for our time" and "shook society into a new pattern from which there could be no going back". She was widely criticised for her militant tactics, and historians disagree about their effectiveness, but her work is recognised as a crucial element in achieving women's suffrage in the United Kingdom. Born in the Moss Side district of Manchester to politically active parents, Pankhurst was introduced at the age of 14 to the women's suffrage movement. She founded and became involved with the Women's Franchise League, which advocated suffrage for both married and unmarried women. When that organisation broke apart, she tried to join the left-leaning Independent Labour Party through her friendship with socialist Keir Hardie but was initially refused membership by the local branch on account of her sex. While working as a Poor Law Guardian, she was shocked at the harsh conditions she encountered in Manchester's workhouses. In 1903 Pankhurst founded the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU), an all-women suffrage advocacy organisation dedicated to “deeds, not words” . The group identified as independent from – and often in opposition to – political parties. It became known for physical confrontations: its members smashed windows and assaulted police officers. Pankhurst, her daughters, and other WSPU activists received repeated prison sentences, where they staged hunger strikes to secure better conditions, and were often force-fed. As Pankhurst's eldest daughter Christabel took leadership of the WSPU, antagonism between the group and the government grew. Eventually the group adopted arson as a tactic, and more moderate organisations spoke out against the Pankhurst family. In 1913 several prominent individuals left the WSPU, among them Pankhurst's younger daughters, Adela and Sylvia. Emmeline was so furious that she "gave [Adela] a ticket, £20, and a letter of introduction to a suffragette in Australia, and firmly insisted that she emigrate". Adela complied and the family rift was never healed. Sylvia became a socialist. With the advent of the First World War, Emmeline and Christabel called an immediate halt to the militant terrorism in support of the British government's stand against the "German Peril". Emmeline organised and led a massive procession called the to illustrate women's contribution to the war effort. Emmeline and Christabel urged women to aid industrial production and encouraged young men to fight, becoming prominent figures in the white feather movement. In 1918, the Representation of the People Act granted votes to all men over the age of 21 and women over the age of 30. This discrepancy was intended to ensure that men did not become minority voters as a consequence of the huge number of deaths suffered during the First World War. She transformed the WSPU machinery into the Women's Party, which was dedicated to promoting women's equality in public life. In her later years, she became concerned with what she perceived as the menace posed by Bolshevism and joined the Conservative Party. She was selected as the Conservative candidate for Whitechapel and St Georges in 1927. She died on 14 June 1928, only weeks before the Conservative government's Representation of the People (Equal Franchise) Act 1928 extended the vote to all women over 21 years of age on 2 July 1928. She was commemorated two years later with a statue in Victoria Tower Gardens, next to the Houses of Parliament.

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Commemorated on 5 plaques

Emmeline Pankhurst 1858-1928 and Dame Christabel Pankhurst 1880-1958 campaigners for Women's Suffrage lived here

50 Clarendon Road, Holland Park, Kensington and Chelsea, W11, London, United Kingdom where they lived

Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928) and her daughters Christabel Pankhurst and Sylvia Pankhurst, founders of the Suffragette Movement, lived here 1897-1907

The Pankhurst Centre, 60-62 Nelson Street, Manchester, United Kingdom where they lived

Here were the headquarters of the women social and political union known as "The Suffragettes" led by Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst. Here also lived Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence, who with her husband played an invaluable part in building up the organisation and edited "Votes for Women".

Clement’s Inn Passage, London, United Kingdom where they worked

Emmeline Pankhurst 1858-1928 Suffragette addressed the people of Llanelli here at the Parish Hall 20 January 1912 [full inscription unknown]

Parish Hall, Church Street, Llanelli, United Kingdom where they spoke (1912)

Emmeline Pankhurst 1858-1928 and her daughters Christabel and Sylvia Founders of the Suffragette Movement lived in a house on this site 1888-1893

8 Russell Square, London, United Kingdom where they was