H. G. Wells
(1866-1946)

writer, apprentice draper (1880), and teacher (1883-1884)

Died aged c. 80

(For other uses, see H. G. Wells (disambiguation).) Herbert George Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946)—known as H. G. Wells—was a prolific English writer in many genres, including the novel, history, politics, social commentary, and textbooks and rules for war games. Wells is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is called a "father of science fiction", along with Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback. His most notable science fiction works include The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), and The War of the Worlds (1898). He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature four times. Wells's earliest specialised training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context. He was also from an early date an outspoken socialist, often (but not always, as at the beginning of the First World War) sympathising with pacifist views. His later works became increasingly political and didactic, and he wrote little science fiction, while he sometimes indicated on official documents that his profession was that of journalist. Novels like Kipps and The History of Mr Polly, which describe lower-middle-class life, led to the suggestion, when they were published, that he was a worthy successor to Charles Dickens, but Wells described a range of social strata and even attempted, in Tono-Bungay (1909), a diagnosis of English society as a whole. A diabetic, in 1934 Wells co-founded the charity The Diabetic Association (known today as Diabetes UK).

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Commemorated on 17 plaques

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H. G. Wells 1866-1946 writer lived and died here

13 Hanover Terrace, London, United Kingdom where he lived and died (1946)

The writer H. G. Wells 1866-1946 lodged here when a teacher at Midhurst Grammar School 1883-4

North Street, Midhurst, United Kingdom where he lodged

H. G. Wells author 1866-1946 lived and worked here 1930-1936

Chiltern Court, Baker Street, London, United Kingdom where he lived and worked

H. G. Wells writer stayed in this house during the year 1888.

18 Victoria Street, Basford, Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom where he stayed

The site of the birthplace of H. G. Wells, born 21 September 1866

Alders (now Primark), 162 Bromley High Street, BR1 1HE, Bromley, United Kingdom where he was born (1866)

H. G. Wells Author 1866-1946 Lived here 1901-1909

Wells House (was Spade House), Radnor Cliff Crescent, Sandgate, United Kingdom where he lived

H. G. Wells 1866-1946 writer worked here in 1880 as a drapers' apprentice for Rodgers & Denyer 25-26 High St.

25-26 High Street, Windsor, United Kingdom where he worked

H. G. Wells [full inscription unknown]

143 Maybury Road, Woking, United Kingdom where he was

Herbert George Wells (1866-1946) H. G. Wells, the writer, lived in this district for several years. Between 1893 and 1894 he lived here and later, on his return from London, moved to 'The Avenue' in Worcester Park. In his novel 'Ann Veronica' (1909), Worcester Park appears as 'Morningside Park'.

25 Langley Park Road, Sutton, London, United Kingdom where he was

The writer H. G. Wells 1866 – 1946 worked in this chemist shop in 1881 which he immortalised in 'Tono-Bungay'

Church Hill Dental Surgery, Church Hill, Midhurst, United Kingdom where he worked (1881)

The writer H. G. Wells 1866 – 1946 attended Midhurst Grammar School as a pupil & teacher 1881, 1883-4

Capron House, Midhurst Grammar School, North Street, Midhurst, United Kingdom where he attended school (1881) and taught (1883-1884)

This 17th century building was first identified as an inn in 1714, when Chapel Street was an important highway. In the early 20th century it was popular with cyclists. H. G. Wells regularly dined and wrote here.

The Drum Public House, 16 Chapel Street, Petersfield, United Kingdom where he dined and wrote

H. G. Wells lived in this house in 1894 whilst writing The Time Machine

23 Eardley Road, Sevenoaks, United Kingdom where he lived (1894)

H. G. Wells author 1866-1946 lived here 1898

Granville Cottage, Granville Road East, Sandgate, United Kingdom where he lived (1898)

H. G. Wells author 1866-1946 lived here 1898-1901

20 Castle Road, Sandgate, United Kingdom where he lived (1898-1901)

Centenary Of Cinema 1996 #106

H. G. Wells author 1866-1946 lived here 1899-1909

Spade House, Folkestone, United Kingdom where he lived (1899-1909)

H. G. Wells & Rebecca West's son born here 1913

Brig-y-don, Victoria Avenue, Hunstanton, United Kingdom where he lived