Scottish Rite Cathedral. Scottish Rite Masonry in San Antonio dates to 1912, when a charter was granted by the Soverign Grand Inspector General of Texas. The orgnization grew slowly until World War I, when many soldiers stationed in San Antonio became members. This site was purchased in 1919,and plans were made to erect a new temple. Construction began in 1922 on this structure. Completed two years later at a cost of $1.5 million, the Cathedral was dedicated in June 1924. It soon became the center of Masonic activities for South Texas. Features of the five-and-one-half story clasical revival temple include an imposing gable front bay, eight Corinthian fluted columns a terra cotta frieze on the primary temple building, and stepped central mass. The elaboarately sculpted bronze front doors, executed over two-year period by noted artist Pompeo Coppini (1870-1957), feature figures of George Washington and Sam Houston, both members of the Masonic fraternity. The Scottish Rite Cathedral has been a San Antonio attraction since its construction. In recent years it has become a center for the performing arts and other cultural activties. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1987 #4612

See also...
Photo of John Adams and George Washington bronze plaque
Wally Gobetz on Flickr
Photo of George Washington blue plaque
Canadian2006 on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Sam Houston black plaque
Nicolas Henderson on Flickr
Photo of Sam Houston blue plaque
Albert Bridge on Geograph
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Sam Houston's Camp. #4504
Photo of Sam Houston black plaque
Billy Hathorn on Wikimedia Commons
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Washington County. To the memory of those courageous souls, the delegates to the Constitutional Convention held here March 1-17, 1836 who declared Texas free, organized a Republic, and framed its constitution Jessie B. Badgett; Dr. George Washington Barnett; Thomas Barnett; Stephen William Blount; John White Bower; Asa Brigham; Andrew Briscoe; John Wheeler Bunton; John S.D. Byrom; Mathew Caldwell; Samuel Price Carson; George Campbell Childress; William Clark, Jr.; Robert M. Coleman; James Collingsworth; Edward Conrad; William Carroll Crawford; Richard Ellis; Dr. Stephen Hendrickson Everitt; John Fisher; Samuel Rhoades Fisher; James Gaines; Dr. Thomas Jefferson Gazley; Benjamin Briggs Goodrich; Jesse Grimes; Robert Hamilton; Bailey Hardeman; Augustine Blackburn Hardin; Samuel Houston; William Demetris Lacey; Albert Hamilton Latimer; Edward Oswald Legrand; Samuel Augustus Maverick; Collin McKinney; Michel Branamour Menard; William Menefee; John W. Moore; Dr. Junius William Mottley; Jose Antonio Navarro; Martin Parmer; Sydney Oswald Pennington; Robert Potter; James Power; John S. Roberts; Sterling Clack Robertson; Francisco Ruiz; Thomas Jefferson Rusk; William Bennett Scates; George Washington Smyth; Elijah Stapp; Dr. Charles Bellinger Stewart; James Gibson Swisher; Charles Standfield Taylor; David Thomas; John Turner; Edwin Waller; Claiborne West; James B. Woods; Dr. Lorenzo De Zavala May these names be engraved on the hearts of all Texans #8399
Photo of Sam Houston and Sam Houston, Jr black plaque
Jpo tx113 on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Sam Houston black plaque
Nicolas Henderson on Flickr
Photo of Sam Houston and Davy Crockett black plaque
Nicolas Henderson on Flickr
Photo of Davy Crockett and Sam Houston black plaque
Nicolas Henderson on Flickr
Photo of Sam Houston black plaque
glennaa on Flickr All Rights Reserved
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Original Site of The Steamboat House. Dr. Rufus W. Bailey, a teacher, minister and attorney educated in New England, came to Huntsville as a language professor at Austin College in 1855. He acquired an eight-acre tract on this site and erected a house which he named "Buena Vista," but which became known as "The Steamboat House" because its unusual design evoked the image of a double-decker steamboat. According to local tradition Bailey gave the house to his son, but the younger Bailey and his wife did not care for the architecture and none of the family ever lived in the house. Dr. Rufus Bailey served as both minister of the Huntsville Presbyterian Church and president of Austin College from 1858 to 1862. In 1862 Bailey rented the house to General Sam Houston, who had been living at his farm in Chambers County since being removed from the Office of Governor of Texas for refusing to take an oath of allegiance to the Confederacy. Dr. Bailey died early in 1863, and his son, F. B. Bailey, inherited the house. General Houston died of pneumonia at the Steamboat House on July 26, 1863, and his funeral was held there the following day. Dr. Pleasant W. Kittrell, friend and physician to General Houston, bought the property in 1866. He died of yellow fever in the 1867 epidemic. In 1873 his widow, Mary Frances Goree Kittrell, traded the house to her brother, Major Thomas J. Goree, a local attorney and Confederate veteran, who made extensive renovations to give the house a Victorian appearance. The house was moved one-half mile from this site in 1927; it fell into disrepair. In 1936 it was moved to the Sam Houston Memorial Museum grounds and was presented to the state on March 2, Texas Independence Day. (2000) #12281
Photo of Sam Houston black plaque
Carbs1992 on Wikimedia Commons
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Sam Houston's First Home in Texas. #15904