Public Libraries of Greenville. In 1903 the Woman's Review Club organized the Greenville Public Library. Various locations were used until a building at 2713 Stonewall was funded by the National Library Program of the steel millionaire, Andrew Carnegie. The city Federation of Women's Clubs provided books and maintained the library. The first Catholic church in the city was located on this lot. In 1953 the city acquired the church property. The next year this structure was completed. The library was renamed in 1976 for civic leader, W. Walworth Harrison. #7825

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Photo of Andrew Carnegie green plaque
OpenPlaques on Flickr
Photo of Andrew Carnegie and W Jacques blue plaque
Spudgun67 on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Andrew Carnegie green plaque
flipflopnick on Flickr
Photo of Andrew Carnegie, William Bakewell, and Town Hall, Ilkley blue plaque
sgwarnog2010 on Flickr
Photo of Andrew Carnegie black plaque
Larry D. Moore on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Andrew Carnegie black plaque
Larry D. Moore on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Andrew Carnegie black plaque
Larry D. Moore on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Andrew Carnegie black plaque
Renelibrary on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Andrew Carnegie black plaque
Larry D. Moore on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Andrew Carnegie black plaque
Rheba on Flickr
Photo of Andrew Carnegie black plaque
Rheba on Flickr
Photo of Andrew Carnegie black plaque
Larry D. Moore on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Andrew Carnegie black plaque
Billy Hathorn on Wikimedia Commons
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Houston Public Library. Within 10 years of its founding in 1836, Houston was a bustling city. Throughout the 1840s, the city's professionals came together in debating societies to discuss a variety of topics. They created the Houston Circulating Library to provide reference materials for their debates. In 1854, they organized the Houston Lyceum. By 1857, the group, which was limited to white, dues-paying males, had almost 800 books in its collection. In 1887, 30 years later and with more than 2,400 books, the Lyceum opened its membership to women. For the next several years, the women members proved to be persistent advocates for creating a public facility. By 1895, the Lyceum provided limited access to non-member adults of Houston. The following year, the library became available to local high school students. In 1899, Houston's city council appropriated money to maintain a free library. Mrs. W. E. Kendall and Mamie Gearing of the Houston Woman's Club wrote a letter to philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, who offered $50,000 for a building. Local organizations, including what had become the Houston Lyceum and Carnegie Library Association, as well as private citizens and businesses, raised money to purchase a site at the corner of McKinney Avenue and Travis Street. The city hired Martin and Moodie Company to design and build the new library, which opened on March 2, 1904 as the Houston Lyceum and Carnegie Library. Under the direction of Julia Ideson, city librarian from 1903 to 1945, the library expanded its services to include several branches and a bookmobile. Ideson oversaw construction in 1926 of a larger central facility, later named in her honor. Her successors continued her work, providing one of the nation's largest cities with books and programs in a variety of locations and languages. (2004) #13093
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Julia Ideson Building. Early efforts by Houston's Lyceum, local women's organizations and Andrew Carnegie's national foundation led to the 1904 Houston Lyceum and Carnegie Library Building. Julia Bedford Ideson, hired in 1903, was the city's first librarian. Under her direction, the library's collection and services expanded until, by 1920, the 1904 building was too small. The city continued to use the building, known by the 1920s as the Houston Public Library, until 1926, when the new library building opened at this site. Ideson and the library building committee worked throughout the 1920s to formulate a plan and program for the new structure, visiting other U.S. cities and accepting proposals from several noted architects. They chose Ralph Adams Cram and his Boston firm, Cram and Ferguson, for the project. Cram worked with local architects William Ward Watkin and Louis A. Glover, coordinating also with the city's architect, W.A. Dowdy. The Southwestern Construction Company served as the builder. Noted for his design work throughout the Northeast, Cram chose the Spanish Renaissance Revival style for Houston's library. Details include tile roof, arched openings, cast stone window surrounds, finials lining the parapet wall, and ornate metalwork. The L-shaped building's materials are primarily brick, cast stone and limestone. After more than 40 years as Houston's librarian, Ideson died in 1945. The city renamed the library six years later to honor her contributions to Houston's library program, as well as her involvement in numerous civic groups and professional associations. Although the city's library facilities and services have continued to expand since the Ideson Building's construction in 1926, the structure continues to serve as a library and local landmark. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2003 #13888
Photo of Andrew Carnegie brown plaque
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Photo of Andrew Carnegie, John Heap, J. D. Harker, Carnegie Library, and 1 other
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