Dickens gurney head
Dickens gurney head
Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

Died aged 58

Charles John Huffam Dickens (/ˈdɪkᵻnz/; 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the twentieth century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories enjoy lasting popularity. Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison. Despite his lack of formal education, he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, five novellas, hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed extensively, was an indefatigable letter writer, and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms. Dickens's literary success began with the 1836 serial publication of The Pickwick Papers. Within a few years he had become an international literary celebrity, famous for his humour, satire, and keen observation of character and society. His novels, most published in monthly or weekly instalments, pioneered the serial publication of narrative fiction, which became the dominant Victorian mode for novel publication. The instalment format allowed Dickens to evaluate his audience's reaction, and he often modified his plot and character development based on such feedback. For example, when his wife's chiropodist expressed distress at the way Miss Mowcher in David Copperfield seemed to reflect her disabilities, Dickens improved the character with positive features. His plots were carefully constructed, and he often wove elements from topical events into his narratives. Masses of the illiterate poor chipped in ha'pennies to have each new monthly episode read to them, opening up and inspiring a new class of readers. Dickens was regarded as the literary colossus of his age. His 1843 novella, A Christmas Carol, remains popular and continues to inspire adaptations in every artistic genre. Oliver Twist and Great Expectations are also frequently adapted, and, like many of his novels, evoke images of early Victorian London. His 1859 novel, A Tale of Two Cities, set in London and Paris, is his best-known work of historical fiction. Dickens's creative genius has been praised by fellow writers—from Leo Tolstoy to George Orwell and G. K. Chesterton—for its realism, comedy, prose style, unique characterisations, and social criticism. On the other hand, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf complained of a lack of psychological depth, loose writing, and a vein of saccharine sentimentalism. The term Dickensian is used to describe something that is reminiscent of Dickens and his writings, such as poor social conditions or comically repulsive characters.

DbPedia
Wikidata Wikipedia

Family tree

friend of Thomas Latimer

Commemorated on 51 plaques

Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Nick Harrison on Flickr
Photo of John Leech and Charles Dickens blue plaque
Jez Nicholson on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Spudgun67 on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Simon Harriyott on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Simon Harriyott on Flickr
Photo of Charles Kitterbell and Charles Dickens blue plaque
Spudgun67 on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Simon Harriyott on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Peter Hughes on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens white plaque
Thomas Nugent on Geograph
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Shaun Ferguson on Geograph
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Graham Tiller on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Peter Hughes on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens white plaque
Graham Tiller on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Chris Hill on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens brown plaque
TonyMo22 on Flickr
Photo of Liverpool Mechanics' Institution, A. H. Holme, and Charles Dickens black plaque
TonyMo22 on Flickr
Photo of Theatre Royal, Rochester and Charles Dickens black plaque
Simon Harriyott on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens black plaque
Simon Harriyott on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens black plaque
Simon Harriyott on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Nick Harrison on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Jez Nicholson on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens black plaque
gnomonic on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens, Myles Birket Foster, and William Adams blue plaque
Simply Jan on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Nick Harrison on Flickr
Photo of Theatre Royal, Canterbury and Charles Dickens grey plaque
Andrew M Butler on Flickr
Photo of Henry John Temple and Charles Dickens blue plaque
Peter Hughes on Flickr
Photo of William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, and George Inn, Southwark black plaque
Simon Harriyott on Flickr
Photo of William Shakespeare and Charles Dickens black plaque
Simon Harriyott on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens and George Inn, Southwark bronze plaque
Simon Harriyott on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens white plaque
Secret Pilgrim on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
flipflopnick on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens and Thomas Humphreys blue plaque
flipflopnick on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens and Thomas Humphreys blue plaque
flipflopnick on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens marble plaque
Nick Harrison on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens, Betsey Trotwood, and David Copperfield marble plaque
Rob Farrow on Geograph
Photo of Charles Dickens and Thomas Latimer blue plaque
sleepymyf on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens and Assembly Rooms, Scarborough blue plaque
Chris Hall on Geograph
Photo of Wool Hall, Chester, St. Nicholas's Chapel, Chester, Chester Music Hall, Theatre Royal, Chester, and 2 other
paul dickson on Geograph
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Kelly on Wikimedia Commons CC0
Photo of Charles Dickens plaque
newcastleplaques on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens brown plaque
Spudgun67 on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Charles Dickens blue plaque
Graham Tiller on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens bronze plaque
Nick Harrison on Flickr
Photo of The Lion, Shrewsbury, Charles Dickens, Niccolò Paganini, William IV, and 4 other
Spudgun67 on Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Charles Dickens stone plaque
Simply Jan on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens bronze plaque
Nick Harrison on Flickr
Photo of Charles Dickens plaque
Christine Matthews on Geograph
Photo of Charles Dickens plaque
Penny Mayes on Geograph

Charles Dickens 1812-1870 novelist lived here

48 Doughty Street, Camden, WC1, London, United Kingdom where he lived

Charles Dickens visited John Leech 1817-1864 humorous artist who lived here in 1849

16 Lansdowne Place, Hove, United Kingdom where he visited (1849)

This building housed the offices of Charles Dickens' magazine 'All The Year Round' and his private apartments 1859-1870

Wellington Street WC2, London, United Kingdom where he lived and published the 'All The Year Round' magazine

Charles Dickens 1812-1870 writer, journalist and social reformer

Charles Dickens Primary School, Lant Street, Borough, London, United Kingdom where he was

Charles Dickens 1812-1870 made several visits to this ancient house in the 1830's

Pilgrims, 4–6 Borough Lane, Eastbourne, United Kingdom where he visited

Here lived Charles Kitterbell as related by Charles Dickens in Sketches by Boz "The Bloomsbury Christening"

14 Great Russell Street, WC1, London, United Kingdom where he wrote about

As a boy Charles Dickens worked here 1824 - 1825

6 Chandos Place, London, United Kingdom where he worked (1823-1824)

Music Hall, Nelson Street. Charles Dickens 1812 - 1870. Charles Dickens gave public readings of his works in this theatre during 6 visits to Newcastle between 1852 and 1867. "A finer audience there is not in England"

Nelson Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom where he performed (1852-1867)

While living in a house on this site Charles Dickens wrote six of his principal works. Characters from which appear in this sculptured panel

Marylebone High Street, London, United Kingdom where he lived and wrote six of his principal works

Charles Dickens 1812-1870 Author Stayed here in 1832

92 North Road, N6, London, United Kingdom where he stayed (1831)

Charles Dickens was born in this house on 7th February 1812

393 Old Commercial Road, Portsmouth, United Kingdom where he was born (1812)

1851-60 Charles Dickens novelist lived in Tavistock House near this site

BMA House, Tavistock Square, WC1, London, United Kingdom where he lived (1851-1860)

In this house Charles Dickens lived 1817-1821

2 Ordnance Terrace, Chatham, United Kingdom where he lived (1816-1820)

Near this house in Hawke Street in 1812 lived Charles Dickens novelist 1812-1870

Hawke Street, Portsmouth, United Kingdom where he lived near

In this building in 1859 and 1860 the novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) gave selected readings from his many works

New Theatre, Kingston Square, Hull, United Kingdom where he gave selected readings from his many works (1859-1860)

Prolific journalist, novelist and, for one day in 1860 Liverpool police constable Charles Dickens born Portsea 1812 died Gad's Hill, Kent 1870 Liverpool lies in my heart second only to London so wrote Dickens, whose first visit was in 1838. From 1842 until 1869, he was a frequent visitor, giving readings from his novels, usually to large audiences at St George's Hall, also at the former Masque Theatre, Duke Street. In 1860 he was sworn in as a constable for 'research purposes'

1 Campbell Square, Liverpool, United Kingdom where he sworn in as a constable (1860)

1835-1837 Liverpool Mechanics' Institution Designed by A. H. Holme Charles Dickens gave readings here

Mount Street, Liverpool, United Kingdom where he gave readings (1834-1836)

Theatre royal A theatre stood on the site of this building from circa 1700-1884. Charles Dickens visited it as a boy and later wrote about it in "The Uncommercial Traveller" and "The Mystery of Edwin Drood".

Star Hill, Rochester, United Kingdom where he visited

Watts' Charity Charles Dickens visited Watts' Charity on May 11th, 1854, and subsequently wrote "The Seven Poor Travellers".

High Street, Rochester, United Kingdom where he visited (1854)

Mr. Tope's This was the home of Mr. Tope, the chief verger of the cathedral in "The Mystery of Edwin Drood". It is the last building mentioned in the writings of Charles Dickens.

High Street, Rochester, United Kingdom where he mentioned in The Mystery of Edwin Drood

Charles Dickens 1812-1870 author of The Pickwick Papers stayed here

The Angel Hotel, Angel Hill, Bury St Edmunds, United Kingdom where he stayed

Charles Dickens 1812-1870 was a frequent visitor to the Bedford Hotel which stood on this site until 1964

Holiday Inn Hotel (former Bedford Hotel), 137 Kings Road, Brighton, United Kingdom where he stayed

Charles Dickens dwelt here 1840

35 St James’s Square, Bath, United Kingdom where he lived (1839)

While staying in this house Charles Dickens (English novelist) wrote part of "David Copperfield" in 1849. Myles Birket Foster (watercolour artist) painted "On The Shore, Bonchurch" in 1862. William Adams (Christian scholar, author of "The Sacred Allegories") lived here from 1843 until his death in 1848

Shore Road, Bonchurch, Ventnor, Isle of Wight, United Kingdom where he stayed and wrote part of David Copperfield (1849)

Charles Dickens stayed here in 1857 and 1862 "They gave you bride cake every day after dinner"

75 Market Street, Lancaster, United Kingdom where he stayed (1857-1852)

In the Theatre Royal on this site Charles Dickens gave a public reading of "David Copperfield" on 4th November 1861

?, Canterbury, United Kingdom where he gave a public reading of "David Copperfield" (1861)

Beyond this old wall is the site of Marshalsea Prison, closed in 1842. This sign is attached to a remnant of the prison wall. Charles Dickens, whose father had been imprisoned here for debt in 1824, used that experience as the Marshalsea setting for his novel Little Dorrit.

Tabard Street Gardens, SE1, London, United Kingdom where he used the experience of his father having been imprisoned here for debt in 1824 as the Marshalsea setting for his novel Little Dorrit

St. George's Hall. Designed by Lockwood and Mawson and built in 1853 for public meetings, concerts and lectures. Palmerston and Dickens spoke here.

Hall Ings, Bradford, United Kingdom where he spoke

The George Inn. It is known that the George Inn existed in the late 16th Century although the present building dates from 1677. Both Shakespeare and Dickens knew the hospitality of the inn which has continued right up to the present day. The inn is now owned by The National Trust

73 Borough High Street, Southwark, SE1, London, United Kingdom where he stayed

Site of "White Hart Inn" immortalized by Shakespeare in "Henry VI" & Dickens in "Pickwick Papers"

White Hart Yard, Borough High Street, Southwark, SE1, London, United Kingdom where he wrote about

In the courtyard at the rear of this building is the George-London's only galleried inn. Immortalized by Charles Dickens in "Little Dorrit"

73 Borough High Street, London, United Kingdom where he was

Here while searching for his aunt Betsey Trotwood David Copperfield rested on the doorstep and ate the loaf he had just bought. Charles Dickens 1850

7 Market Square, Dover, United Kingdom where he wrote about

Charles Dickens stayed here on February 1st & 2nd, 1838, while collecting material for his novel "Nicholas Nickleby".

14 Market Place, Barnard Castle, United Kingdom where he stayed (2013)

The site of one of two premises used by Thomas Humphreys, clock-maker, made famous by Charles Dickens in "Master Humphrey's Clock".

1 Newgate, Barnard Castle, United Kingdom where he wrote about

The site of one of two premises used by Thomas Humphreys, clock-maker, made famous by Charles Dickens in "Master Humphrey's Clock".

9 Market Place, Barnard Castle, United Kingdom where he wrote

Charles Dickens lived here, 1839, 1840, 1845, 1849 & 1859, and wrote part of Nicholas Nickleby.

12 Albion Street, Broadstairs, United Kingdom where he lived (1838), lived (1839), lived (1844), lived (1849), lived (1859), and wrote part of Nicholas Nickleby

In this house lived the original of Betsey Trotwood in "David Copperfield" by Charles Dickens, 1849

Dickens House Museum, 2 Victoria Parade, Broadstairs, United Kingdom where he was

Charles Dickens, 1812-1870, Novelist, stayed here, the home and printworks of Thomas Latimer, 1803-1888, campaigning journalist.

143 Fore Street, Exeter, United Kingdom where he stayed

143 Fore Street 18th Century Merchants House Built in 1714 by Sir Thomas Bury, merchant: sold to Sir John Duntze (also a merchant) in 1733 and lived in by his family until 1788. In the 19th century it became the offices of the 'Western Times' which was printed in the adjacent buildings. Charles Dickens, who was a personal friend of Thomas Latimer, the paper's proprietor and editor, stayed here in 1839.

143 Fore Street, Exeter, United Kingdom where he stayed (1838)

Assembly Rooms. Built in 1857, Charles Dickens gave readings here 1858.

4-6 Huntriss Row, Scarborough, United Kingdom where he gave readings (1858)

St. Nicholas's Chapel. Originally a medieval chapel, this was Chester's Commonhall in the 16th Century and later became the Wool Hall. It was licensed as the Theatre Royal in 1777, and converted into the Chester Music Hall by James Harrison in 1855. Charles Dickens performed here in 1867.

St Nicholas Chapel, St Werburgh Street, Chester, United Kingdom where he performed (1867)

Charles Dickens 1812-1870 stayed here at the George Hotel and in "Nicholas Nicklesby" described it as 'one of the best inns in England'

George Hotel, Grantham, United Kingdom where he stayed

Charles Dickens lived in a house on this site when a boy in 1823

141 Bayham Street, NW1, London, United Kingdom where he lived (1822)

Charles Dickens novelist lived here B: 1812. D: 1870

Prudential Buildings, 138–142 Holborn, EC1, London, United Kingdom where he lived

Charles Dickens 1812-1870 spent his last night in Portsmouth here on 25th May 1866 in the Pier Hotel

Southsea Terrace, Portsmouth, United Kingdom where he stayed

Where the civic centre now stands was the Swinton Moral and Industrial School set up by the Manchester Poor Law Union. 'Union' was the name given to groups of parishes which had joined together to provide workhouses. The Manchester Union was one of the first to set up a large separate institution for pauper children. Charles Dickens himself visited the school in 1850 and said that it could easily be mistaken for a duke's country seat. He called it a pauper's palace. Swinton Industrial School Opened in 1846 - Closed 1925 'The Pauper's Palace' also locally known as "The Bastille"

Chorley Road, Swinton, United Kingdom where he was

The Lion. Dating from before 1618, the premier coaching on the London-Holyhead route. Famous visitors include Charles Dickens, Paganini, William IV, Jenny Lind, D'Quincy, Madame Tussaud, Disraeli. Particular features of note include Adam Ballroom & Tapestry Lounge

Wyle Cop, Shrewsbury, United Kingdom where he visited

Charles Dickens

Fort Road, Broadstairs, United Kingdom where he was

Charles Dickens's Wine Cellar The wine cellar used by Charles Dickens during his time at Doughty Street has been restored and refitted with the financial assistance of national wine merchants Peter Dominic.

48 Doughty Street, London, United Kingdom where he was

Charles Dickens novelist born 1812 died 1870 lived for a time in Furnivals Inn close to this spot and there wrote Pickwick in the year 1836.

, London, United Kingdom where he lived

Sun Hotel formerly known as The Little Inn made famous by Chas. Dickens in his travels thro' Kent Built 1503

, Canterbury, United Kingdom where he wrote about